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Full text of "National Parks: Camping Guide"

The National Parks: 
Camping Guide 



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The National Parks: 
Camping Guide 



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Produced by the Ranger Activities Division 
and the Division of Publications 
National Park Service 

U.S. Department of the Interior 
Washington, D.C. 1991 



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National Park Service. U.S. Department of the Interior 



As the nation's principal con- 
servation agency, the Depart- 
ment of the Interior has 
responsibility for most of our 
nationally owned public lands 
and natural resources. This 
includes fostering wise use of 
our land and water resources, 
protecting our fish and wild- 
life, preserving the environ- 
mental and cultural values of 
our national parks and his- 
torical places, and providing 
for the enjoyment of life 
through outdoor recreation. 
The Department assesses our 
energy and mineral resources 



and works to assure that their 
development is in the best 
interest of all our people. The 
Department also promotes 
the goals of the Take Pride 
in America campaign by 
encouraging stewardship and 
citizen responsibility for the 
public lands promoting citizen 
participation in their care. 
The Department also has a 
major responsibility for 
American Indian reservation 
communities and for people 
who live in island territories 
under U.S. administration. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Govern- 
ment Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402 



Contents 



Introduction 4 

Safety and Regulations 8 
A Guide for Planning Your Trip 10 
Maps of the National Park System 12 
Visiting Other National Parks 15 

A Guide to National Park 
Camping Areas 16 

Index 112 



The National Park Service welcomes you to some of the worlds 
greatest camping areas, ranging from the wooded campgrounds 
near the rockbound coast of Acadia National Park in Maine to 
those in the Chihuahuan Desert and the Rio Grande Canyon of 
Big Bend National Park in Texas. Whether you camp by the 
water at Cinnamon Bay in the Virgin Islands or deep in the 
rugged wilderness of the parks in Alaska, you are about to em- 
bark upon an adventure that will be memorable and rewarding. 
It may be that you will hike into the backcountry and pitch your 



i 




tent beside a gurgling brook and breathe in deeply of the fresh, 
sweet air. Or perhaps you will watch chipmunks playing around 
a campground while you savor the wafting odors of meals cook- 
ing over campstoves. Or in the rush to set up your campsite, 
you forget to look around, but when you do you see the sun 
setting through the trees, gilding the land. Simple things, any 
one of them. But when taken together and combined with the 
joy that comes from relaxing with people you like amidst some 
of this country's most pristine landscapes, you end up with a 




sense of completeness and confidence. The variety of what you 
will find may astonish you, for no matter how excitedly you 
envision what the parks are like, the reality is always a surprise, 
whether it be the scenery, the wildlife, the friendliness of the 
National Park Service rangers, or the other people you meet. 
Ever since Yellowstone became the first national park in 1 872, 
tourists have been going to the parks, camping as they traveled 
and building a tradition that continues in more than 1 00 parks 
today. That tradition also brings with it an obligation of trust 




Park Fees 

All information on prices and 
conditions of fees detailed be- 
low are subject to change. 

Entrance Fees Many parks 
charge entrance fees. A 
single-visit entrance fee 
ranges from $3 to $10 for each 
private, non-commercial pas- 
senger vehicle. If you plan to 
travel to several national 
parks you may want to pur- 



chase a Golden Eagle Pass. 
This annual entrance permit 
sells for $25 and permits en- 
trance into all national parks. 
Also available are park- 
specific annual passes that sell 
for $10 or $15, depending on 
the park. These entrance pass- 
es are also good for one cal- 
endar year. Both the Golden 
Eagle and park-specific pass- 
es can be purchased at na- 
tional parks where entrance 
fees are charged. Two other 
permits— the Golden Age 
Passport and Golden Access 
Passport— allow free entry 
into the national parks. The 
Golden Age Passport is a life- 
time entrance permit issued 
free to any United States citi- 
zen or permanent resident 
age 62 or older. To receive 
this permit, you must present 
proof of age, such as a driver's 
license, or sign an affidavit 
attesting to one's eligibility. 
A Golden Access Passport is 
issued free to blind or perma- 
nently disabled persons. 
Applicants must present proof 
of disability or sign an affi- 
davit attesting to eligibility 
for receiving benefits under 
federal law. The Golden Age 
and Golden Access Passports 
are issued in parks where 
entrance fees, camping fees, 



or other recreation use-fees 
are charged. All four types of 
passes allow not only the 
holder but persons traveling 
in the same private, non- 
commercial vehicle to enter 
the parks free. 

Camping Fees In addition 
to entrance fees, many parks 
charge fees at some or all of 
their camping areas. In tent 
and recreational vehicle 
campgrounds, fees range 
from $3 to $15 per night per 
campsite. In group camp- 
grounds, fees may be higher. 
Camping fees at group camp- 
grounds often vary according 
to the size of the group; a min- 
imum fee often is charged. 
The Golden Eagle and indi- 
vidual park passes do not 
reduce the price of camping 
fees, but the Golden Age 
Passport and Golden Access 
Passport reduce the price of 
staying in campgrounds by 50 
percent. These price reduc- 
ductions do not apply to 
campgrounds run by conces- 
sioners, who operate some 
camping areas in the parks. 

Camping Reservations 

Most campsites are available 
on a first-come, first-served 
basis, but many sites are avail- 



that each camper must acknowledge, for these parks and their 
campgrounds must be left for others to use, generation after 
generation. So, again we say welcome; enjoy your camping 
experiences in your national parks. May you leave with memo- 
ries to treasure as the years go by. 



able by reservation. Depend- 
ing on the camping area, 
reservations may be made 
with a park concessioner, 
through the Ticketron reser- 
vation system, or, in some 
cases, with the park directly. 
See the individual park 
entries for specific infor- 
mation on making reserva- 
tions. Ticketron reservations 
can be made by stopping by 
in person at any of the many 
Ticketron outlets located 
throughout the United States, 
or any of the national parks 
on the Ticketron reservation 
system (including Acadia, 
Assateague Island, Death 
Valley, Grand Canyon, Great 
Smoky Mountains, Joshua 
Tree, Ozark, Rocky Moun- 
tain, Sequoia, Shenandoah, 
Whiskey town-Shasta-Trinity , 
Yellowstone, Yosemite), or 
National Park Service infor- 
mation offices in Washington, 
D.C., San Francisco, Atlanta, 
Phoenix, Philadelphia, Den- 
ver, and Woodland Hills, 
California. You can receive 
an application through the 
mail by writing: Ticketron, 
P.O. Box 617516, Chicago, 
IL 60661-7516; by writing to 
parks on the Ticketron reser- 
vation system; by contacting 
Park Service regional offices 



(see addresses on page 15); 
or by calling 800-452-1111. 
International callers should 
dial 312-902-1919. The appli- 
cation should be mailed at 
least 2 weeks before the start 
of your trip. Neither the 
National Park Service nor 
Ticketron can be responsible 
for delays in mail service. 
Reservations can be made as 
much as 8 weeks in advance 
or up to the day before the 
start of a camping stay, but 
it is recommended that 
reservations be made as 
early as possible. 

Park Activities 

National parks offer a wide 
range of special activities for 
visitors. In many parks rang- 
ers give evening programs in 
main camping areas at 
outdoor amphitheaters or 
around a campfire. These 
programs may be talks illus- 
trated with slides, demonstra- 
tions, or movies. A program 
may touch on any aspect of 
the park— its wildlife, its plant 
life, its geology, its wilderness, 
its past, present, or future. 
During the day parks also 
may offer other activities, 
such as guided hikes, nature 
walks, and boat trips, tours 
of historical sites, slide shows, 



films, demonstrations, and 
talks. Some parks have spe- 
cial programs for children. 
Schedules of activities are 
posted at visitor centers and 
often at camping areas. 

Camping for Disabled 
Persons 

In many parks, modifications 
have been made in camping 
areas to make them more ac- 
cessible to disabled persons, 
especially wheelchair users or 
others who have difficulty 
walking. The extent of modi- 
fication varies from park to 
park and from camping area 
to camping area. Some parks 
have accessible campsites 
with larger-than-normal paved 
areas. Some have paved walk- 
ways to nearby restrooms. 
Some have restrooms with 
ramps, handrails, and other 
features for the disabled visi- 
tor. Some have picnic tables 
and fire grills specially de- 
signed for wheelchair users. 
Handicapped-accessible 
campsites may be available 
on a first-come, first-served 
basis, or by reservation. A 
few parks have special back- 
country sites. 



Safety and Regulations 



To protect the national parks' 
natural and historical re- 
sources and the millions of 
people who come to enjoy 
them, the National Park Ser- 
vice asks every visitor to abide 
by some regulations and heed a 
few safety recommendations. 
Park staffs take precautions 
to ensure that you have a safe, 
pleasant visit, but your 
cooperation is essential. 



Some park hazards -deep 
lakes, steep cliffs, extremely 
hot or cold temperatures - 
cannot be eliminated. How- 
ever, accidents and illnesses 
can be prevented if you use 
the same common sense you 
would at home and become 
familiar with the park. Take 
some time before your trip or 
when you first arrive to get to 
know a park's hazards and its 



regulations. If you have chil- 
dren, make sure they under- 
stand them, too. 

A few rules and safety tips 
are common to many parks. 
For example, at all parks you 
must keep your campsite clean 
and the park free of litter by 
disposing of refuse in trash 
receptacles. The National 
Park Service also asks you to 



Safe Driving 

Park roads are designed for 
sightseeing, not speeding. 
They are often narrow and 
winding, and sometimes 
steep. Drive carefully and 
observe posted speed limits. 
Watch for pedestrians, bi- 
cyclists, other drivers, wild- 
life, fallen rocks or trees, 
slippery roads, and other haz- 
ards. Be especially alert for 
motorists who might stop un- 
expectedly for sightseeing or 
wildlife viewing. You should 
use roadside pullouts instead 
of stopping on the roadway. 

Campfires 

Most parks permit fires as 
long as certain rules are fol- 
lowed. To avoid a wildfire 
that would be dangerous to 
people or property or damag- 
ing to natural resources, parks 
may allow only certain types 
of campfires. For example, 
they may permit fires only in 
grills provided or designated 
fire rings. Parks may prohibit 
fires in some areas. Firewood 
gathering may be prohibited 
or restricted to certain areas; 
plan on bringing your own 
fuel supply. Fires should be 
kept under control, should 
never be left unattended, 
and should be extinguished. 



Quiet Hours 

Campers should try to keep 
noise to a minimum at all 
times, but especially from 
10 p.m. to 6 a.m. 

Pets 

Pets must always be leashed, 
or otherwise physically re- 
strained, for the protection of 
the animal, other visitors, and 
wildlife. Pets may be pro- 
hibited from certain areas, 
including public buildings, 
trails, and the backcountry. 
A few parks prohibit pets 
altogether. Dog owners are 
responsible for keeping their 
pets quiet in camping areas 
and elsewhere. Seeing-eye 
dogs and guide dogs for deaf 
persons are exempted from 
park restrictions. 

Protection of Valuables 

When you leave your camp- 
site, take valuables with you 
or hide them in a locked ve- 
hicle, preferably in the trunk. 

Heat, Cold, and Other 
Hazards 

Campers, as well as other vis- 
itors, should take precautions 
to deal with the demands and 
hazards of a park environ- 
ment. On hot days, pace 
yourself and perform strenu- 



ous activities in the morning 
and evening hours. Drink 
plenty of water and other 
fluids. On cold days, or when 
you get cold and wet, frost- 
bite and the life-threatening 
illness called hypothermia can 
occur. Avoid subjecting your- 
self to these conditions for 
long periods. In the thinner 
air of mountains and high pla- 
teaus, tasks easy to perform 
at home can leave a person 
short of breath and dizzy: 
slow down. If a thunderstorm 
occurs, avoid exposed areas 
and open bodies of water 
where lightning often strikes. 
Keep out of lowlying areas 
and stream beds where flash- 
floods are most likely to 
occur. Get to know the other 
environmental hazards in a 
park. 

Wild Plants and Animals 

Please help preserve the na- 
tive plants and animals pro- 
tected in the parks. Leave 
them as you find them, undis- 
turbed and safe. Hunting or 
carrying a loaded weapon is 
prohibited in all but a few 
parks. While you are more 
likely to encounter poisonous 
plants such as poison ivy or 
biting insects, you should be 
aware of the hazards posed 



8 



■■i 

follow federal regulations 
and refrain from the overuse 
and abuse of alcohol and the 
use of drugs, a contributing 
factor to many park injuries 
and deaths. Other rules and 
safety tips that are widespread 
throughout National Park 
Service areas are outlined 
below. More detailed infor- 
mation may be provided in 
park brochures, on signs, and 



on bulletin boards at camping 
areas and other park sites. If 
you have questions, talk with 
a ranger. The National Park 
Service asks that you report 
any violation of park regula- 
tions that you witness. If you 
are injured or become ill, the 
staff can assist you by direct- 
ing you to the nearest medi- 
cal center, and, in some parks, 
by giving you emergency care. 




by other wild plants and ani- 
mals, too. Rattlesnakes, Gila 
monsters, and other poison- 
ous reptiles, ticks, and animals 
carrying rabies and other 
transmittable diseases inhabit 
some parks. Any wild crea- 
ture, whether as large as a 
bison or moose or as small 
as a raccoon or prairie dog, is 
unpredictable and should be 
viewed from a distance. Feed- 
ing animals is prohibited. 

Campers should especially 
guard against attracting bears 
to their campsites. A close 
encounter with a grizzly, 
brown, or black bear can re- 
sult in serious injury or death. 
Parks in bear country recom- 
mend, or often require, that 
campers take certain precau- 
tions. One is to keep a clean 



campsite. Bears' sensitive 
noses can easily detect food 
and the smell of food left on 
cans, bottles, and utensils. 
Food should be stored in con- 
tainers provided by the parks 
or in your vehicle— preferably 
out of sight in the trunk with 
all the windows tightly closed. 
Trash should be disposed of 
in bear-proof garbage cans or 
stored away with your food. 
In the backcountry, food 
should be hung from poles or 
wires that are provided or 
from a tree; inquire at the 
park as to the recommended 
placement. In treeless sur- 
roundings, campers should 
store food at least 50 yards 
from any campsite. 

Backcountry Camping 

Camping in the remote back- 
country of a park requires 
more preparation than other 
camping. Most parks require 
that you pick up a back- 
country permit before your 
trip so rangers will know of 
your plans and be able to talk 
them over with you. They 
can advise you of hazards 
and regulations and give you 
up-to-date information on 
road, trail, river, lake, or sea 
conditions, weather forecasts, 
special fire regulations, avail- 



ability of water, and other 
matters. Rangers and back- 
country permits can be found 
at visitor centers, headquar- 
ters, and ranger stations. 

There are a few basic rules to 
follow whenever you camp in 
the backcountry. Stay on 
trails. Pack out all trash. 
Obey fire regulations. Be pre- 
pared for sudden and drastic 
weather changes. Carry a 
topographic map or nautical 
chart when necessary, and 
carry plenty of food and wa- 
ter. In parks where water is 
either unavailable or scarce 
you may need to carry as 
much as 1 gallon of water per 
person per day. In other 
parks springs, streams, or 
lakes may be abundant but 
always purify water before 
drinking it. Untreated water 
can carry contaminants. One 
of the most common, espe- 
cially in Western parks, is 
giardia, a disease-causing 
organism that causes an un- 
pleasant intestinal illness. A 
variety of others also exist. 
Depending on the contami- 
nant, water may have to be 
boiled, filtered, or purified 
with tablets; check with the 
park staff for the most effec- 
tive treatment. 



A Guide for Planning Your Trip 



The guide on the following 
pages is intended to help you 
plan a camping trip in the na- 
tional parks. At a glance, it 
will give you an idea of the 
variety of places where you 
can camp and provide you 
with practical information 
about camping seasons, 
campground facilities, and 
other important details. Once 
you have selected the park or 



parks where you would like 
to stay, you probably will 
want additional information. 
The best source for more de- 
tails or for confirmation of in- 
formation that is especially 
important to you is the parks 
themselves. On request, the 
parks will gladly provide you 
with more facts on camping 
in the park, services, activities, 
special natural and historical 



features, weather, safety, and 
regulations. They also will 
provide available information 
about alternative camping 
areas outside the park run by 
states, counties, other federal 
agencies, and private opera- 
tors. When writing the parks 
for additional information, be 
sure to write well in advance 
of your planned departure 
date. This guide, combined 



©Park name and mailing 
address 

©Setting— A general descrip- 
tion of a park's camping areas. 

©Tent/RV Campgrounds- 
Information on tent and 
recreational vehicle camp- 
grounds, the main camping 
areas at most parks. These 
camping areas are designed 
for individual campers, fami- 
lies, and other small camping 
parties. Access is by a paved 
road or graded dirt or gravel 
road unless otherwise noted. 
Besides the facilities listed, 
picnic tables and fire grills, 
pits, or rings are usually pro- 
vided. Where flush toilets are 
not available, some other type 
of toilets usually is provided. 
Information on a few special 
camping shelters open to 
small parties is also given. 

©Group Campgrounds— 
Information on group camp- 
grounds, which are designed 
for large camping parties. 
Parks often restrict use of 
these campgrounds to cer- 
tain kinds of groups. Many, 
for example, allow only or- 
ganized groups such as edu- 
cational, scientific, church, 



or youth groups. Parks also 
may have minimum and max- 
imum group size restrictions. 
Access is by a paved road or 
graded dirt or gravel road un- 
less otherwise noted. Besides 
the facilities listed, these 
areas usually have picnic 
tables and fire grills, pits, or 
rings. Where flush toilets are 
not provided, some other 
kind of toilets usually is 
available. Information on a 
few special camping shelters 
that are open to large groups 
is also given. 

©Backcountry Campsites— 
Information on backcountry 
campsites, remote camping 
areas located away from 
roads and developed areas. 
Backcountry campers have to 
use some means other than a 
regular passenger vehicle— 
such as hiking, horseback 
riding, or boating— to get to a 
site. Small camping parties 
are preferred in most back- 
country areas, but some sites 
are occasionally set aside 
specially for larger groups. 
Picnic tables, toilets of any 
kind, drinking water, and fire 
grills, pits, or rings are rarely 
provided; campstoves often 
are required. 



©Special Notes— Important 
messages to campers from 
the park staff. 

©Mileposts— Milepost num- 
bers for main camping areas 
located along a major park 
road or trail. Mileposts are 
listed for Denali, Chesapeake 
and Ohio Canal, Natchez 
Trace Parkway, Blue Ridge 
Parkway, and Shenandoah. 

©Special access— Camping 
areas that cannot be reached 
by driving a regular passen- 
ger vehicle over paved or 
graded dirt or gravel roads 
but require some special 
means of transportation. Sites 
may be designated as: walk-in 
(for short distances), hike-in 
(for longer distances), horse- 
back ride-in, bike-in, boat-in, 
canoe-in only, climb-in, fly-in, 
4WD-in (4-wheel-drive-in), or 
high-clearance 2WD-in 
(2-wheel-drive-in). 



10 



Sample 




Gap XationalyHistorical 
P.O. Box liok. Middles 
Setting: The Wildernes 
iel Boone and othe 
camping area. Seve 
in the mountains 
Tent/RV Campgrou 
first-served basis. A 
Group Campground: T 





Y4J»65 

istoric route through th^Appalachian Mountains that Dan- 
owed on their way wes/in the 1700s, winds past the main 
ted backcountry camping areas are perched along a high ridge 
k-tfckory forests predominate throughout the region, 
campground is open froin late spring to late fall on a first-come, 
hq/dicapped-accessible site/are available. 

campground is open frwn late spring to late fall. Reservations are 



required; call the park. JEach site accommodates/p to 48 persons. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry campinans allowed all year at sites shown below on a 
first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry p^mit is required. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonallyA>ithin 1 mile of camping areas include: Wilder- 
ness Road — hot showers, gasoline, firewood, evening campfire programs. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limn Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Riley Creek0T5 




©Total sites— The total 
number of sites available in a 
camping area. In some cases 
a park has not designated a 
specific number of campsites. 
In these cases, the number of 
sites is listed as "open" if the 
park does not impose restric- 
tions on how many persons 
may use the camping area; or 
"ltd" (limited) if the park does 
impose restrictions. 

©RVs— Sites for recreational 
vehicles are available. All 
types of RVs— from trailers 
to motorhomes to small tent- 
campers— are permitted 
unless otherwise noted in the 
text above the chart. Camp- 
ground limits on the length 
of RVs and the availability of 
water, electrical, and sewage 
hookups also may be noted 
above. 

©Tents— Sites for tent 
camping are available. 



©Fee— A camping fee is 
charged. 

©Limit of stay— The number 
of days a camping party is 
allowed to stay in a park 
camping area during a visit. 
In many parks the limits vary 
during the year. In these 
cases, the limits listed are 
those enforced during the 
peak visitor season; changes 
during a park's off-season are 
noted in the text above. In 
some parks the permitted 
length of stay in the back- 
country varies from campsite 
to campsite; in these cases, 
"varies" appears in the chart. 

©Drinking water— Potable 
water is available in the 
camping area. Water is avail- 
able all year unless otherwise 
noted in the text above. 

©Flush toilets— Flush toilets 
are available in the camping 



with the information you re- 
ceive from the parks, will 
help you plan your vacation 
wisely. When you're finally 
ready to leave on your trip, 
take this guide along as a 
handy reference. 



area. Flush toilets are avail- 
able all year unless otherwise 
noted in the text above. 

©Sanitary dump— A sanitary 
sewage dump station for 
recreational vehicles is pro- 
vided in the camping area. A 
fee is sometimes charged. 

©Camp store— A store that 
sells basic supplies such as 
groceries, ice, firewood, and 
charcoal is within 2 miles of a 
camping area. Stores may be 
open all year or seasonally. 



11 



The National Park System 



National parklands with camping areas are shown in color 



North Cascades 

Olymblc* # * Lake Chelan 

Klondike Gold Rush • 

>W ASH I NGTON •coulee Dam 
Mount Rainier* 
Fori Clatsop bp* 



Glacier* 



Fort Vancouver 



Redwood 




• 



Whitman Mission 



John Day Foaall Beds e 

OREGON 

*Crater Lake 
• Oregon Caves 



Lava Bed* 




• Grant-Kohrs Ranch 
• Big Hole 



MONTANA 

Theodore Roosevelt 






IDAHO 




Fort Union Trading Post 

^* 

* Knife River Indian Villages 

* NORTH DAKOTA 



Craters ot the Moon 




* Custer Bartleflel 
* Bighorn Canyon 

Devils Tower 

• John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Parkway SOUTH DAKOTA 

*Grand Teton 



• Yellowstone 



i 






• Hagerman Fossil Beds 



• City ol Rocks 



Mount Rushmore, 
Jewel Cave • 



• Badlands 



Pipestone • 



•Wind Cave 



WYOMING 



• Lassen Volcanic 

CALIF. 



# Golden Spike 

• Fossil Butte 



Fort Laramie* 



• Agate Fossil Beds 



Missouri* 



• Scotts Blurf 



\ 



nt Reyes^ 
ilrWoods>A*4 ohnMulr 



S\" Eugene O'Neill 
<] • Yosemlte 



NEVADA 

Great Basin • 



Tlmpanogos Cave • 

UTAH 



irt Point 

jlden Gate 

in Francisco Maritime 

Pinnacles* 



i 



.Dinosaur 



NEBRASKA 



• Rocky Mountain 



COLORADO 

•Colorado 
* Arches 



Homestead * 






Florissant Fossil Beds 




• Black Canyon of the Gunnison 
anyonlands •curecanti 



• Devils Postpile 

Capitol Reef # 

# Kings Canyon Cedar Breaks Bryce Canyon *Can 

m Death Vallev t;~_ * Glen Canyon 

Sequoia* • y z,on » • • Natural Bridges * Bent's Old Fort 

Hovenweep. „ * 

Rainbow BrldgV^Mela » ^ Sa " d DU " M 

•Navajo * * 

_ ._ _ Artec Ruins _ 

Grand Canyon* eCapulln Volcano 

Canyon de Chelly _. „ .. T 

-Chaco Culture 



KANSAS 

Fort Larned 



Pipe Spring * 
• Lake Mead 



Fort I 



Channel Islands 



Hohokam Pima* 




Santa Monica Mountains Sunset Crater.«Wupatki Hubbell Trading Post 

^ m ... — n -■ ■■ • •Fort Union 

•Walnut Canyon Bandeller *„„„. 

Tuzlgoot, Petrlfled# • Zunl-Clbola • peco » 

loshuaTree* Montezuma Castle • Forest / *EI Malpals 

ARIZONA EIMorro/ NEW MEXICO 

# Tonto •Salinas Pueblo Missions 



j 

Lake Meredith OKLAHOM, 
•Allbates Flint Quarries 



Chickasaw 



Organ Pipe Cactu 



*Casa Grande 
Saguaro. 



• Fort Bowie 
•Chirlcahua 
"^^joronado r^iim 



• Gila Cliff Dwellings 

• White Sands 







* Carlsbad Caverns 

Guadalupe Mountains 



TEXAS 



•Fort Davis 



,Rlo Grande 

N * Amistad 






Big Bend* 



• Lyndon B. Jol 



• San Antonio 
Missions 



Padre Islan 



Palo Alto Battlefield* 




12 



voyageurs 
Grand' 

1INN. 





Saint Croix Island 



Acadia 



Saratoga •"'•JSM^ 
• Saugus Iron Woi*« ■> 

Martin Van Buren MAJ5S. 



wix 



Saugus trpn Works a^ <=^ 

FU.V^»l»Cod 

Roger WWiams 
nklln D. Roosevelt 

ui's Church 
Sagamore Hill 



Adams 

Boston 

Boston African-American 

Frederick Law Olmsted 

John Fitzgerald Kennedy 

Longfellow 

Minute Man 



Springfield ArmoL 
Vanderbilt Mansion • H C ON N, 

*r Dataware* • Home 



Fire Island 



Upper Delaware 

Delaware 
Steamtown • * 
Delaware Water Gap • 
James A. Garfield Morrlstown edlson" 

Hopewell Furnace. N . J) 

Valley Forge. .--Edbar Allan Poe 
Allegheny Portage Railroad, da Eisenhower Independence 

Johnstown Flood* ' " • •jGettysbufJ Thaddeus Kosciuszko 




Mound City Group e 
William Howard Taft • 



New River Gorge * m 
Bluestone 



ry S Truman m George Rogers Clark 

Jefferson National 
xpanslon Memorial Lincoln Boyhood e 

Abraham Lincoln Birthplace* 

Mammoth Cave • B| fl Sou *h Fork 

Cumberland Gap 

Obede 



Fort Necessity CatocUn.MDfcHJtoptonJ 
OHIO Friendship Hill •• Anttetam e* ^f?rt M^nry 
Harpers Ferry* t cy DfcL. 
Manassr* 
Prince William Foi 
Shenandoah e 
Fredericksburg and Spotsyl 
•Gauley River . 

W. VA. S ' cn ' 



take 



W 



and Ohio Canal. 

i Assateague Island 



IISSOURI 

e Ozark 
m Wilson's Creek 

orge Washington Carver 

Fort Donelson 
Pea Ridge 
e Buffalo 



ashington Birthplace 
et. Walker 
. Petersburg^ <JWOtenial 
V A . • Appomattox Court House 
• Booker T. Washlngtofk |gM ^^ 

_, Wue Ridge Parkway ^Tj\ HritoM , 

e Guilford Courthouse_/ ft 08 ** Hatox** 



• Andrew Johnson 
Great Smoky Mountains 



• Stones River • - ...... 

TENN. Carl Sandburg Horn? Co # w ^ n n 9 8 * 



rt Smith ARK. 



Shilohe Russell Cavee 



Brices Cross Roads * 
# Hot Springs Tupelo e 

Arkansas Post* m 

Natchez Trace Parkway 
Natchez Trace Trail* 



v Chickamauga and Chattanooga 

Ninety Size S.C 
eC( 

A rihaHahnnrhaa R' 

Kennesaw Mountain e 

ALA. 

Horseshoe Bend • 



Poverty Point • 



MISS. Tuskegee Institute • 
evicksburg 



\ 



e Chattahoochee River 
• Martin Luther King, Jr. 

GEORGIA 

•Ocmulgee V 



• Andersonville 
Jimmy Carter 




• Natchez 



<j\ ^QuH Islands 

Lafittee r* 





ape Lookout 
Creek 



ongar 



arles Pinckney 
Fort Sumter 



Fort Pulaski 



Fort Frederlca 

<* Cumberland Island 
eTImucuan 

Fort Caroline*.. 

.Castillo de San Marcos 

• Fort Matanzas 



De Soto 




I Biscayne 



Castle Clinton 

Federal Hall 

Gateway 

General Grant 

Hamilton Orange 

Statue of Liberty 

Theodore Roosevelt Birthplace 

Arlington House 

Clara Barton 

Constitution Gardens 

Ford's Theatre 

Fort Washington 

Frederick Douglass 

George Washington Parkway 

Greenbelt 

John F. Kennedy Center 

Lincoln Memorial 

Lyndon Balnes Johnson 

Monocacy 

National Capital Parks 

National Mall 

Pennsylvania Avenue 

Plscataway 

Potomac Heritage Trail 

Rock Creek 

Theodore Roosevelt island 

Thomas Jefferson Memorial 

Vietnam Veterans Memorial 

Washington Monument 

White House 

Wolf Trap Farm 



Fort Jefferson* 



13 



The National Park System (continued) 



Lfll 



Alaska 



9 



Cape Krusenstern • 
Bering Land Bridge 



^S> 




»1* - * c 



Seven national park areas in Alaska have adjoining national preserves, counted as separate 
units of the National Park System. They are: Aniakchak, Denali, Gates of the Arctic, 
Glacier Bay, Katmai, Lake Clark, and Wrangell-St. Elias. 



Guam 



War in the Pacific 



«? 



Hawaii 

• Kataupapa 

USS Arizona Memorial «fc>. 



Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands 



?S3 



Haleakala 



Puukohola Herfauy"~-\ 

Kaloko-Honokohau* \ 



Puuhonua o Honaurwu>^Haw ali volcanoes 



«, Virgin Islands 
)San Juan I ^ "*'» 

m Buck Island Reel 

Christiansted 



The National Park of American 
Samoa is not shown on this map. 



14 



Visiting Other National Parks 




Besides the many parklands 
listed in this camping guide, 
there are many, many other 
national park areas with 
extraordinary scenic, natural, 
and historical treasures. They 
are located in all corners of 
the nation in the mountains, 
forests, seashores, lakeshores, 
deserts, and wilderness areas 
of the country, and in cities 
and towns. The National Park 



Service invites you to visit 
these other sites, too. All na- 
tional park sites are shown on 
the maps on the three preced- 
ing pages. 



Where To Stay 

National parks that do not 
have camping areas often are 
located near campgrounds 
operated by private indi- 
viduals, by state or county 
agencies, or by other federal 
agencies such as the U.S. 
Forest Service, the Bureau of 
Land Management, or the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 
You may want to consider 
staying in these campgrounds. 
Or, as an alternative, you 
may want to consider spend- 
ing the night in lodging avail- 
able in many parks or nearby. 
For information on where to 
stay, contact the parks di- 
rectly or, if you do not have 
their addresses, contact the 
appropriate National Park 
Service regional offices 
(listed here) or the National 
Park Service Public Inquiries 
Office, Room 1013, P.O. 
Box 37127, Washington, DC 
20013. 

National Park Service 
Regional Offices 

North Atlantic Region 
National Park Service 
15 State Street 
Boston, MA 02109 
Connecticut, Maine, Massa- 
chusetts, New Hampshire, 
New Jersey, New York, 
Rhode Island, Vermont 



Mid-Atlantic Region 
National Park Service 
143 South Third Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19106 
Delaware, Maryland, Penn- 
sylvania, Virginia, West 
Virginia, excluding parks 
assigned to National Capital 
Region 

National Capital Region 
National Park Service 
1100 Ohio Drive, SW 
Washington, DC 20242 
Metropolitan area of Wash- 
ington, D.C., with some units 
in Maryland, Virginia, West 
Virginia 

Southeast Region 
National Park Service 
Richard B. Russell Federal 
Building 

75 Spring Street, SW 
Atlanta, GA 30303 
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, 
Kentucky, Mississippi, North 
Carolina, South Carolina, 
Tennessee, Puerto Rico, the 
Virgin Islands 

Midwest Region 
National Park Service 
1709 Jackson Street 
Omaha, NE 68102 
Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, 
Kansas, Michigan, Minne- 
sota, Missouri, Nebraska, 
Ohio, Wisconsin 



Rocky Mountain Region 
National Park Service 
12795 West Alameda Parkway 
P.O. Box 25287 
Denver, CO 80225 
Colorado, Montana, North 
Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, 
Wyoming 

Southwest Region 
National Park Service 
P.O. Box 728 
Santa Fe,NM 87504 
Arkansas, Louisiana, New 
Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, 
northeast corner of Arizona 

Western Region 

National Park Service 

600 Harrison Street 

Suite 600 

San Francisco, CA 94107-1372 

California, Hawaii, Nevada, 

most of Arizona 

Pacific Northwest Region 
National Park Service 
83 South King Street 
Suite 212 

Seattle, WA 98104 
Idaho, Oregon, Washington 

Alaska Region 
National Park Service 
2525 Gambell Street 
Anchorage, AK 99503 
Alaska 



15 



«*40% * 



4 



x* 



tk 



. ™ 



* 






i'« * 






rWi 



4» i 



-J 






* umrti 



In simpler days: Camming in Yosemite in 192(9 



\*' 




A Guide to National Park 
Camping Are 




Alaska 

Denali National Park and Preserve 
P.O. Box 9, Denali Park, AK 99755 

Setting: The park was set aside in 1917 for the protection of the most extraordinary collections 
of wildlife left on the North American continent. Campers will have an opportunity to see 
moose, caribou, wolf, Dall sheep, and grizzly bears that range throughout the park's virgin 
spruce forests, wild river valleys, and mountain slopes. The Alaska Range and 20,320-foot Mt. 
McKinley (Denali), North America's tallest peak, dominate this subarctic wilderness. 
Tent/RV Campground: Riley Creek campground is available all year. Morino, Savage River, 
Sanctuary, Teklanika River, and Igloo campgrounds are open from late May to mid-September, 
dependent upon snow and weather conditions. Wonder Lake campground is open from June 10 
through the second Wednesday after Labor Day. All sites are available one day in advance from 
the Visitor Access Center. The limit of stay for all campgrounds during the season is 15 days; 
after Labor Day the limit of stay is 30 days. Water and flush toilets are available until early 
September when temperatures freeze the water lines. Trailers and motor homes are prohibited 
beyond Teklanika River. Morino, Sanctuary, Igloo, and Wonder Lake campgrounds are for tent 
camping only and require access by the visitor transportation system, or walking (Morino). Private 
vehicle access to Teklanika Campground requires a minimum 3 night stay, otherwise access is 
by the visitor transporation system buses. Accessible sites near accessible toilets are reserved 
for use by disabled persons at Riley Creek, Savage, Teklanika, and Wonder Lake campgrounds. 
Group Campground: The campground is open from late May to mid-September; exact dates 
depend on road and snow conditions. The group campground is located near Savage River 
campground. Reservations are required; contact the park. Each site can accommodate up to 
20 persons and 2 vehicles. 

Backcountry Campsites: Limited numbers of backcountry campers are permitted throughout 
most of the park. A backcountry permit is required and may be obtained in person one day in 
advance at the Visitor Access Center. 

Special Notes: Visitors should plan a 2-3 day stay in the park area to allow time for obtaining 
campsites and visitor transportation system bus coupons. Hot showers, a restaurant, a gasoline 
station, firewood, telephones, and evening programs are available near the park entrance 
during late May to early September. These facilities and programs are within one mile of 
Morino and Riley Creek campgrounds. Evening ranger programs are offered at Savage River, 
Teklanika River, and Wonder Lake campgrounds. All campers must keep a clean camp and 
store food away to avoid attracting grizzly bears. Food must be kept in locked vehicles or storage 
lockers that are provided in all campgrounds. In the backcountry, campers should store food 
in bear resistant containers, which the park issues with backcountry permits. Fires are permitted 
only in grills provided or camp stoves; stoves are required in most of the backcountry. Milepost 
numbers along the park road are listed after each campground name below. Milepost is at 
the park entrance; the higher the number, the farther into the park's interior. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Rush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 



Riley Creek 0.5 



Morino 2.0 (walk-in) 
Savage River 12.5 
Sanctuary River 22.0 
Teklanika River 28 
Igloo Creek 33.6 
Wonder Lake 85 
Group Campground 



102 • 


• < 


1 14 i 


» • 


• 


• 


10 


• i 


» 14 i 


» • 


34 • 


• i 


» 14 i 


» • 


7 


• i 


I 14 < 




50 • 


• i 


1 14 i 




7 


• i 


» 14 i 




28 


• i 


» 14 i 


> • 







Savage River 12.5 • • 14 

Backcountry Campsites 



Various locations (hike-in) ltd • 14 

18 



Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve 
Gustavus, AK 99826 

Setting: In this frozen wilderness campers are surrounded by ice-clad mountains, coastal fjords, 
spruce-hemlock forests, and glaciers galore. Seabirds and marine mammals, including hump- 
back, minke, and orca whales, inhabit the waters of Glacier Bay, while wolves, moose, and 
brown and black bears roam on land. Park access is by boat and plane only. 
Group Campground: See "Backcountry Campsites" below for information on a backcountry 
group site. 

Backcountry Campsites: Bartlett Cove and Bartlett Cove group camp are open all year on a 
first-come, first-served basis. Drinking water is not available at the camping area but is pro- 
vided x k mile away at Bartlett Cove docks from April to October. A warming hut with a wood- 
stove is provided in the camping area. The group camp can accommodate up to 20 persons. 
Backcountry camping is also allowed throughout much of the rest of the park on a first-come, 
first-served basis; registration is requested. 

Special Notes: Scheduled and charter air services, cruise ships, and charter boats from Juneau, 
Alaska, provide access to the town of Gustavus, 10 miles from Bartlett Cove camping area; from 
Gustavus buses and taxis will transport campers to the Bartlett Cove area. Boats also land in 
Bartlett Cove within % mile of the camping area. Tour boats will pick up campers at Bartlett Cove 
and drop them off in the more remote backcountry of Glacier Bay; reservations are recommended. 
Contact the park for transportation information. Services available seasonally within 1 mile of 
camping areas include: Bartlett Cove — hot showers, coin-operated laundry, restaurant, white 
gas, evening ranger programs. An orientation program for backcountry campers is given at the 
backcountry ranger office on a regularly scheduled basis and on request. Campers should bring 
all necessary supplies; Juneau, 50 air miles away, is the nearest major supply point. Transporting 
any kind of fuel on airplanes is prohibited. Campers should keep a clean camp and store food 
away to avoid attracting black and brown bears; food should be kept in storage caches provided 
or, in the backcountry in canisters available from the park or hung high in trees. The park staff 
also encourages campers not to cook or eat in their campsites and requires that Bartlett Cove 
campers cook and eat in the intertidal zone on the beach. Fires are permitted in the woodstove 
and in an established fire ring on Bartlett Cove beach; campstoves must be used in the backcountry. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Backcountry Campsites 

Bartlett Cove (walk-in) 

Bartlett Cove Group Camp 
(walk-in) 

Other locations (boat-in, 
fly-in) 



Katmai National Park and Preserve 
P.O. Box 7, King Salmon, AK 99613 

Setting: From wilderness retreats, campers can explore the coastal mountains, valleys, enor- 
mous lakes, and rushing rivers of this Alaskan peninsula refuge. The Valley of Ten Thousand 
Smokes, center of one of the Earth's most active volcanic areas, is a popular backpacking area. 
Brown bears fish for salmon in rivers. Park access is by floatplane or boat. 
Backcountry Campsites: Brooks Camp is open from May to early September by reservation 
only. Three 3-sided shelters are provided for cooking. More remote backcountry camping is 
allowed throughout the rest of the park; it is recommended from June through August. 
Special Notes: Commercial floatplanes ferry passengers from King Salmon, Alaska, to Brooks 
Camp daily from June to mid-September. Year-round air charter services are available in King 
Salmon. Contact the park for transportation information. Services available seasonally within 
1 mile of camping areas include: Brooks Camp— hot showers, meals, van tours of the Valley of 
Ten Thousand Smokes, evening ranger programs. Food and other camping supplies are lim- 



ltd 


• 


14 


1 


• 


14 


open 


• 


30 



19 



ited in the park; bring all necessary gear and supplies. Transporting any kind of fuel on planes 
is prohibited; white gas can be purchased at Brooks Camp. Campers should keep a clean camp 
and store food away to avoid attracting brown bears. In Brooks Camp, food should be stored in 
provided elevated caches; in the backcountry, food should be hung high from trees and kept at 
some distance from campsites. Fires are permitted only in established fire pits or campstoves. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Backcountry Campsites 



Brooks Camp 28 



Other locations (hike-in, open 

boat-in) 



Kenai Fjords National Park 
P.O. Box 1727, Seward, AK 99664 

Setting: Drowned alpine valleys filled by the sea, an icefield wilderness, a shoreline home for 
sea birds and marine mammals define the park's beauty and majesty. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground, located in an alder and willow forest in the Resur- 
rection River drainage x k mile from Exit Glacier, is open from late-May to early-October on a 
first-come, first-served basis. Pit toilets are available. Water is available at a pump in the camp- 
ground. Small self-contained RVs can use this campground. Four grills, separate from the 
campsites are available for cooking. No fee is charged. 

Special Notes: Public use shelters for skiers are available during the winter for a fee; call the 
park for reservations, 907-224-3175. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Rush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 

Exit Glacier 10 • •" • 



Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park 
P.O. Box 517, Skagway, AK 99840 

Setting: Where prospectors once traveled in search of gold, campers today find refuge in an 
expanse of Pacific coastal forests of hemlock, spruce, and aspen and a highcountry tundra wil- 
derness. All camping areas are near the Chilkoot Trail, the historic route of the Klondike Gold 
Rush of 1898. Skagway can be reached by ferry, plane, and road. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open from mid-May through September on a first- 
come, first-served basis. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year at sites shown below on a 
first-come, first-served basis. Shelters with woodstoves are provided in two camping areas; in 
the summer they are to be used only for drying out and warming up, but in the winter they can 
be used as camping shelters. 

Special Notes: No food, fuel, or other supplies are available in the campground; the nearest are 
9 miles away in Skagway, Alaska. Fires are permitted in established fire rings, woodstoves, or 
campstoves. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 



Dyea 22 • ♦ 14_ 

Backcountry Campsites 



Chilkoot Trail (hike-in) open • 14 



20 



Arizona 

Canyon de Chelly National Monument 
P.O. Box 588, Chinle, AZ 86503 

Setting: Cottonwood-shaded camping areas lie near the mouths of two steep-walled canyons- 
Canyon de Chelly and Canyon del Muerto — where villages of cliff dwellings built by the 
Anasazi Indians between 350 and 1300 A.D. are preserved. The entire park is part of the 
Navajo Indian Reservation. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 
Group Campground: The campground is open from April 1 through October. Reservations are 
recommended and are accepted up to 90 days in advance; call the park. Groups must include 
at least 15 persons and no more than 25; no RVs permitted. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Cottonwood— restaurant, horse and jeep rentals, visitor center with a museum of ancient Ana- 
sazi and Navajo artifacts, ranger-led programs. Alcohol is prohibited in the park. The Navajo 
Reservation observes daylight savings time in the summer, but the rest of Arizona does not. 
Diesel fuel is available 15 miles north of Chinle at Many Farms, Arizona. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 



Cottonwood 104 

Group Campground 



Cottonwood 



Chiricahua National Monument 
Dos Cabezas Route, Box 6500, Willcox, AZ 85643 

Setting: Camping areas are located in a dense forest of oak, juniper, and pine in the Chiricahua 
Mountains, a rugged range that abounds with stone spires and columns, balanced rocks, and 
other strange eroded volcanic rock formations. In this highcountry campers can escape the 
heat of the Sonoran and Chihuahuan deserts surrounding the mountains. Mexican wildlife can 
be seen in the park. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 
Trailers up to 26 feet long are permitted. Disabled persons can call the park and reserve a 
campsite near the restroom. The campground usually fills on weekends from March through 
October. 

Group Campground: The campground is open all year. Reservations are recommended; call 
the park. The campground is only for organized groups. The site accommodates up to 20 
persons. 

Special Notes: Services available all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: Bonita 
Canyon— visitor center and historic Faraway Ranch. Fires are permitted only in grills or camp- 
stoves. Firewood gathering is prohibited; charcoal can be purchased at the visitor center. Pets 
must be kept on a leash at all times. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 



Bonita Canyon 26 • • • 14 

Group Campground 



Bonita Canyon Group Site 1 • • 14 



Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (see Utah) 



21 



Grand Canyon National Park 
P.O. Box 129, Grand Canyon, AZ 86023 

Setting: The Grand Canyon sets a grand and colorful stage for campers. Many campers stay on 
the North and South Rims above the mile-deep canyon of the Colorado River at elevations of 
between 7,(XX) and 8,000 feet. More isolated backcountry camping areas are located on the 
rims and throughout the canyon, including along the river. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Mather (on the South Rim) is open all year. From March to December 
reservations are recommended, especially the months of May through November; see pages 6-7 
for details. Mather sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis December through 
February. Desert View (on the South Rim) and North Rim are open from about mid-May to 
mid-October. Desert View operates on a first-come, first-served basis. Trailer Village (on the 
South Rim) is open all year and reservations are recommended; persons should contact the 
park concessioner at Grand Canyon National Park Lodges, Reservations Office, P.O. Box 699, 
Grand Canyon, AZ 86023. Water, electrical, and sewage hookups for RVs are available only at 
Trailer Village. No more than 6 persons are permitted at each Desert View, Mather, and North 
Rim site. Six accessible sites near wheelchair-accessible restrooms are available at Mather. 
Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are provided at Desert View. Campgrounds fill up almost 
every day by noon from at least June to mid-September. 

Group Campgrounds: Mather is open from March 1 through the middle of November. Reser- 
vations are required throughout the camping season. North Rim is open from about mid-May 
to mid-October. See pages 6-7 for details on making reservations. Mather accommodates 12 to 
50 persons per site; North Rim, from 6 to 25. Both campgrounds have restrictions on the 
number of vehicles allowed per site. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park. 
A backcountry permit is required. Reservations are required and can be made beginning Octo- 
ber 1 for the upcoming year; write Backcountry Reservations Office in care of the park. Reser- 
vations also can be made in person at reservations offices on the North Rim from mid-May to 
mid-October or on the South Rim all year. The limit of stay is as noted below for Bright Angel, 
Cottonwood, and Indian Gardens from spring through fall; it is extended in the winter. The 
limit of stay in the rest of the park varies with location. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Bright Angel— restaurant; Desert View— gasoline station, snack bar, evening ranger programs; 
Mather and Trailer Village— hot showers, coin-operated laundry, gasoline, visitor center, eve- 
ning ranger programs; North Rim— hot showers, coin-operated laundry, gasoline. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Desert View 



Mather 



North Rim 



Trailer Village 



Group Campgrounds 

Mather 



North Rim 



Backcountry Campsites 

Bright Angel (hike-in) 



Cottonwood (hike-in) 
Indian Gardens (hike-in) 



Other locations (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in, boat-in) 



50 


• 


• 


• 


7 


• 




• 


319 


• 


• 


• 


7 


• 


• • 


• 


82 


• 


• 


• 


7 


• 


• • 


• 


84 


• 




• 


7 


• 


• • 


• 




6 


• 


• 


• 


7 


• 


• • 


• 


4 




• 


• 


7 






• 




31 





• 




2 


• 




• 


14 


• 




2 


• 






15 




• 




2 


• 






open 




• 




varies 









Lake Mead National Recreation Area (see Nevada) 



22 



Navajo National Monument 
H.C. 71, Box 3, Tonalea, AZ 86044-9704 

Setting: The main camping areas are in pinyon-juniper forests near the rim of Tsegi Canyon, 
where cliff dwellings built by the Anasazi Indians as early as 1250 A.D. are preserved. Back- 
country campers can stay near Keet Seel, largest of the Anasazi villages in the canyon. Navajos 
discovered the dwellings, and today the park is surrounded by the Navajo Indian Reservation. 
Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open from May through October on a first-come, 
first-served basis; late snowfalls can delay the opening. RVs up to 27 feet long are permitted. 
Overflow camping is available in the group campground. 

Group Campground: The campground is open from May through October. Reservations are 
recommended; call the park. One campsite accommodates 30 persons; the other, 20. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed from Memorial Day to Labor Day at 
sites shown below on a first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. The 
camping area accommodates up to 25 persons. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Betatakin and Group Camp— visitor center, with museum and Navajo arts and crafts shop, 
evening ranger programs; Keet Seel — ranger-guided tours of Keet Seel ruins. No food, fuel 
(including diesel fuel), or other supplies are available in the park; the nearest are 10 miles away 
at Black Mesa Trading Post. Fires are permitted only in grills provided or campstoves. Wood fires 
and firewood gathering are prohibited. Alcohol is not allowed in the park. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 

Betatakin 



Group Campground 



Group Camp 



Backcountry Campsites 

Keet Seel (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 



30 • 


• 


7 


• 


• 


• 




2 • 


• 


7 










ltd 


• 


1 









Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument 
Route 1, Box 100, Ajo, AZ 85321 

Setting: The extraordinary wildlife of the Sonoran Desert shares its severe habitat with camp- 
ers. The arid mountains-and-plains terrain is home to organ pipe cacti, saguaros, chollas, a 
variety of desert trees and shrubs, coyotes, peccaries, roadrunners, Gambel's quail, and Gila 
monsters. Profusions of spring wildflowers sometimes carpet the desert floor after winter rains. 
Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 
The limit of stay is as noted below from January 15 to April 30; the rest of the year it is 30 days. 
RVs up to 35 feet long are permitted. Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are available. The 
campground usually fills up by mid-day from mid-January through March. 
Group Campground: The campground is open all year; reservations required. Call the park. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park. 
A backcountry permit is required. Camping parties are limited to 8 persons or less. 
Special Notes: Fires are permitted only in grills provided or campstoves. Firewood gathering is 
prohibited. Rattlesnakes are prevalent in warmer months; carry a flashlight at night. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 



Tent/RV camping area 208 • • • 14 

Group Campground 



Group camp 6 • • #14 

Backcountry Campsites 



Various locations (hike-in) open • 14 

23 



Saguaro National Monument 

3693 South Old Spanish Trail, Tucson, AZ 85730-5699 

Setting: In this Sonoran Desert preserve, campers leave behind the desolate beauty of saguaro 
country and climb up into the cooler, higher elevations of the rugged Rincon Mountains. Oak 
and pine woodlands and coniferous forests cover mountain slopes. The park includes two sep- 
arate districts; all camping is in Saguaro East, also known as the Rincon Mountain District. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year at designated sites. A back- 
country permit is required. Permits can be obtained a maximum of 6 weeks in advance and no 
later than noon on the day of departure. As many as 14 horses are permitted at Manning Camp; 
up to 7 are allowed at other campsites. 

Special Notes: Fires are permitted only in designated grates or campstoves. No food, fuel, or 
other supplies are available in the park; the nearest are about 5 miles away from the park 
(Saguaro East) in Tucson, Arizona. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Rush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Backcountry Campsites 

Douglas Springs (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 

Grass Shack (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 



Happy Valley (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 

Juniper Basin (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 

Manning Camp (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 

Spud Rock (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 



3 i 


> 7 


3 i 


> 7 


3 i 


> 7 


3 1 


> 7 


6 i 


1 7 


3 i 


» 7 



24 



Arkansas 

Buffalo National River 

P.O. Box 1173, Harrison, AR 72602-1173 

Setting: The swift-moving Buffalo River meanders past many nearby camping areas on its 

148-mile journey through the Ozark Mountains. The watercourse is lined with bluffs as high as 

500 feet. Riverside stands of willow, sycamore, river birch, and cottonwood blend into upland 

forests of oak and hickory. The river is a popular place for float trips and sport fishing. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: The campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Buffalo Point has water all year, and electrical and water hookups for RVs and flush toilets 

from April to November; vault toilets are provided the rest of the year but no hookups are 

available. Water and flush toilets are available at other campgrounds noted below from April 

to November; vault toilets are provided the rest of the year. Kyles Landing and Steel Creek are 

accessible only via steep, winding gravel roads; the park recommends that buses and larger 

RVs not use these campgrounds. All campgrounds except Lost Valley are accessible by boat 

and by road; Lost Valley is accessible only by road. Buffalo Point, Erbie, and Tyler Bend have 

some sites and restrooms accessible to the disabled. 

Group Campgrounds: The campgrounds are open all year. Reservations are required at Buffalo 

Point and Tyler Bend; call the park. Erbie is open on a first-come, first-served basis. Water and 

flush toilets are available at Buffalo Point and Tyler Bend from April to November; vault toilets 

are provided the rest of the year, but water is not. Water is available at Erbie only from April to 

November, too. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year on riverside gravel bars and 

in some other areas of the park. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Buffalo 

Point— hot showers, evening ranger programs; Tyler Bend— hot showers, evening ranger 

programs; Lost Valley— evening ranger programs. Canoe rentals are available along the river 

all year. Swimming is permitted, but diving or jumping into the river from rocks or bluffs is 

extremely dangerous. Diesel fuel is available in nearby communities. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Buffalo Point 

Carver 
Erbie 



Hasty 



Kyles Landing 



Lost Valley 



Maumee South 



Mt. Hersey 



Ozark 



Rush 



Steel Creek 



Tyler Bend 



Woolum 



Group Campgrounds 



Buffalo Point 



Erbie 



Tyler Bend 



Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in, 
boat-in) 



107 • • • 14 • • • 


ltd • • 14 


30 • • 14 • 


ltd • • 14 


ltd • • 14 • 


15 • 14 • 


ltd • • 14 


ltd • • 14 


ltd • • 14 • • 


ltd • • 14 • 


ltd • • 14 • 


38 • • 14 • • • 


ltd • • 14 




5 • • 14 • • • 


10 • 14 • 


6 • 14 • • • 




ltd • 



25 



Hot Springs National Park 
P.O. Box 1860, Hot Springs, AR 71902 

Setting: Like the soothing thermal spring waters that have attracted people to this area for 
centuries, the park's campground, nestled in the Ouachita Mountains along Gulpha Creek, 
offers refreshment and relaxation. Visitors can partake of the hot waters at Buckstaff Bath- 
house and Hot Springs Spa in the park and at 4 nearby hotel-bathhouses. 
Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 
Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 2 miles of the campground include: gas, food, 
laundry, medical services, and visitor services. Fires are permitted only in grills provided or 
campstoves. Area roads are narrow, winding, and heavily traveled; drive carefully. No electrical 
power or water is available at the individual campsites. Diesel fuel can be found within 1 mile. 
Campfire programs may be available seasonally at the campground amphitheater. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 



Gulpha Gorge 47 • • ♦ 14 



26 



California 

Channel Islands National Park 
1901 Spinnaker Drive, Ventura, CA 93001 

Setting: More than 10 miles off southern California's mainland coast, four of the rocky, wind- 
swept Channel Islands— Anacapa, Santa Barbara, Santa Rosa, and San Miguel— give refuge to 
campers as well as sea birds, sea lions, and a few hardy species of plants. Offshore, California 
gray whales sometimes appear. Access to these islands is by boat and plane. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year on Santa Barbara, Santa Rosa, 
and Anacapa; summer only on San Miguel. Camp at designated areas. No more than 30 campers 
are permitted and reservations are required. Contact the visitor center for more information. 
Special Notes: Commercial boats ferry passengers from Ventura, California, to all five islands. 
For information or reservations contact Island Packers, Inc., 1867 Spinnaker Dr., Ventura, CA 
93002. Reservations should be made at least one week in advance and further ahead on holiday 
weekends. In the summer the boats run daily to Anacapa and by scheduled dates to the other 
islands; the boats run less frequently the rest of the year. Campers must climb a 154-step stair- 
way to reach the Anacapa camping area or hike up a steep switchback trail to reach the Santa 
Barbara and San Miguel camping areas. No supplies are available on the islands; campers must 
bring food, fuel, water, and other essentials. A tent that can be anchored securely against strong 
winds is recommended. There is no shade. Campers must pack out trash. Fires are permitted 
in campstoves throughout the year. Wood and charcoal fires are prohibited. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Backcountry Campsites 



Anacapa (boat-and-hike-in) 

Santa Barbara (boat-and- 
hike-in) 

San Miguel (boat-and- 
hike-in) 

Santa Rosa (boat-and-plane- 
and-hike-in) 



ltd 


• 


14 


ltd 


• 


14 


ltd 


• 


2 


ltd 


• 


14 



Death Valley National Monument 
Death Valley, CA 92328 

Setting: Summer temperatures soar above 120°F, but during the rest of the year campers can 
find comfortable quarters in Death Valley's mountains and plains. Some camping areas are 
desert oases with planted shade trees and water. In others, campers sample the Mohave Desert 
virtually unaltered. Elevations range from 282 feet below sea level to 11,049 feet. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Furnace Creek and Wildrose are open all year. Stovepipe Wells, 
Sunset, and Texas Spring are open from October through April. Emigrant is open from April 
through October. All sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis, except Furnace Creek 
and the Texas Spring group sites, which are available for reservations early November through 
late April; see pages 6-7 for details. Sunset is not recommended for tents; it does not have picnic 
tables or grills. Stovepipe Wells does not have picnic tables; grills are located at tent sites only. 
The limit of stay noted below for all campgrounds is for the year-long period from October 1 to 
September 30 each year. Sunset has 16 accessible sites near wheelchair-accessible restrooms. 
Furnace Creek and Mesquite Springs have wheelchair-accessible restrooms. 
Group Campgrounds: Texas Spring is open from November through April. Both of its sites can 
accommodate 50 persons and 10 vehicles. Reservations are required for both areas; contact 
the park. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping at sites shown below is on a first-come, first- 
served basis; it is recommended from May through October. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Furnace Creek, Stovepipe Wells, Sunset, and Texas Spring— hot showers, restaurant, gasoline 

27 



station, evening ranger programs. Diesel fuel can be found in Beatty, Stateline, Pahrump, and 
Las Vegas, Nevada, and in Lone Pine, Olancha, Baker, Ridgecrest, and Trona, California. From 
June through September daytime temperatures are often in the 100s°F. Fires are allowed only 
in grills or campstoves; wood gathering is prohibited. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Birthday, Presi- 
dent's Day, Easter week, Death Valley 49ers Encampment (2nd weekend in November), Thanks- 
giving weekend, and Christmas and New Year's week are all particularly congested. For your 
own enjoyment we suggest camping at times other than these. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Emigrant 



Furnace Creek 



Stovepipe Wells 
Sunset 



Texas Spring 
Wildrose 



Group Campgrounds 



Mesquite Spring 



Texas Spring 



Backcountry Campsites 

Mahogany Flat (4WD-in, 
hike-in) 

Thorndike (4WD-in, hike-in) 



10 • i 




30 • 


• 






158 • « 


• 


14 • 


• 


• 


• 


200 • 1 


• 


30 • 


• 


• 


• 


1000 • 1 


• 


30 • 


• 


• 


• 


93 • « 


• 


30 • 


• 


• 


• 


39 • i 




30 • 










1 i 


• 


30 • 


• 


• 




2 i 


• 


30 • 


• 


• 


• 




10 • « 




30 








8 • i 




30 









Devils Postpile National Monument 
P.O. Box 501, Mammoth Lakes, CA 93546 

Setting: Beyond the lodgepole pine forest along the Middle Fork of the San Joaquin River where 
the camping area is located lies the unusual formation of columnar basalt called Devils Postpile. 
Glaciers flowed through the valley and eroded most of the lava from the area leaving a rem- 
nant known as Devils Postpile. There the ice cut a vertical face, exposing the sides of the col- 
umns. A second major feature of this region of the Sierra Nevada is 101-foot-high Rainbow Falls. 
Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open from about mid-June to mid-October, depend- 
ing on road and snow conditions. Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. 
Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of the campground include: Devils 
Postpile — ranger programs. No food, fuel, or other supplies are available in park; the nearest 
are 2 miles away at Reds Meadow or 13 miles away in Mammoth Lakes, California. Campers 
should keep a clean camp and store food in vehicles to avoid attracting black bears. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campground 

Devils Postpile 



21 



14 



28 



Golden Gate National Recreation Area 
Fort Mason, Building 201, San Francisco, CA 94123 

Setting: The city of San Francisco, San Francisco Bay, and the 4,200-foot-long Golden Gate 
Bridge are clearly visible in the distance from many camping areas, yet the feeling of wilder- 
ness prevails amid this area of sandy beaches, coastal woods, and windswept hills and valleys in 
the Marin Headlands. 

Group Campgrounds: Battery Alexander is open all year. Kirby Cove is open from April 1 to 
October 31; exact dates depend on weather and road conditions. Reservations are required 
for both campgrounds; they can be made 90 days in advance. For reservations call the park's 
Marin Headlands Visitor Center in Marin County. Sites can accommodate from 8 to 65 campers. 
The number and type of vehicles permitted in the campgrounds are restricted. Wheelchair- 
accessible toilets are available at both Kirby Cove and Battery Alexander. The number of days 
of stay may be extended to 5 during periods of low demand. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year at sites shown below. Reser- 
vations are required; contact the park's Marin Headlands Visitor Center in Marin County. 
Special Notes: Fires are permitted only in grills, designated fire rings, or campstoves. In 
the backcountry fires are allowed only in campstoves. Winters are wet, and fog is common 
in the summer. Cliffs are prone to landslides and often covered with poison oak; avoid climb- 
ing them. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Group Campgrounds 

Battery Alexander 

Kirby Cove 



1 


• 


3 


• 


4 


• 


3 


• 




3 


• 


3 




7 


• 


3 




3 


• 


3 





Backcountry Campsites 

Bicentennial (hike-in) 
Haypress (hike-in) 
Hawkcamp (hike-in) 



Joshua Tree National Monument 

74485 National Monument Drive, Twentynine Palms, CA 92277 

Setting: Two deserts— the Mohave, with its out-of-the-ordinary forests of Joshua trees and other 
high desert plants, and the Colorado, with its mix of cactus, ocotillo, and other low desert 
plants— merge in the park, and camping areas are located in both. Coyotes, jackrabbits, and 
roadrunners are just some of the native inhabitants. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Belle, Hidden Valley, and portions of Cottonwood, Indian Cove, and 
Jumbo Rocks are open all year. Black Rock, Ryan, White Tank, and all of Cottonwood, Indian 
Cove, and Jumbo Rocks are open from about October through May. Black Rock is also open 
from about June to September for horse camping only. All sites, except Black Rock which is 
available on a reservation basis, are available on a first-come, first-served basis; see pages 6-7 
for details. Horses are allowed at Ryan. The limit of stay is as noted below for all campgrounds 
from October 1 to June 1 ; the rest of the year it is 30 days. RVs up to 32 feet long are permitted 
in the campgrounds. 

Group Campgrounds: The campgrounds are open from about October through May. Reserva- 
tions, see pages 6-7 for details, are required throughout the camping season. Wheelchair-acces- 
sible toilets are provided at Indian Cove and Sheep Pass. The campgrounds are available to 
recognized civic groups; i.e. scouts and church groups. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed throughout much of the park on a 
first-come, first-served basis. The park staff recommends camping in the fall, winter, or spring 
because in the summer high temperatures are common and there is no water and little respite 
from the heat in the backcountry. 

Special Notes: Drinking water is available only at four park areas— Cottonwood Campground 
and Visitor Center, Black Rock Canyon Campground, Oasis Visitor Center, and Indian Cove 
Ranger Station. Campers should bring a sufficient supply of water to their campsites. Interpre- 

29 



tive programs are available seasonally; check campground bulletin boards and visitor centers 
for times. Summer temperatures commonly exceed 100°F. Diesel fuel can be found in Twenty- 
nine Palms. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Belle 

Black Rock 
Cottonwood 



Hidden Valley 
Indian Cove 



Jumbo Rocks 
Ryan 



White Tank 



Group Campgrounds 

Cottonwood (walk-in) 



Indian Cove (walk-in) 

Sheep Pass (walk-in) 

Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in) 



20 • • 14 


ltd • • • 14 • • • 


62 • • • 14 • • • 


54 • • 14 


113 • • 14 


130 • • 14 


27 • • 14 


20 • • 14 




3 • • 14 • • • 


13 • • 14 


6 • • 14 




open • 



Kings Canyon National Park 
Three Rivers, CA 93271 

Setting: From the spectacular canyon of the Kings River— one of the deepest gorges in North 
America— to the high Sierra Nevada, a wide selection of camping areas is offered. Like Sequoia 
National Park to the south, groves of giant sequoias grow here, as well as stands of ponderosa 
pine, white fir, and incense cedar. In the highcountry, lakes, waterfalls, and alpine meadows 
can be found. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: The campgrounds are located in two main areas of the park— Cedar 
Grove and Grant Grove. Cedar Grove campgrounds include Canyon View, Moraine, Sentinel, 
and Sheep Creek. Grant Grove campgrounds include Azalea, Crystal Springs, and Sunset. All 
Cedar Grove campgrounds are open from about late April to November; exact dates depend 
on road and snow conditions. Sentinel has an accessible campsite near accessible restrooms. In 
Grant Grove, Azalea is open all year. The rest of the campgrounds are open from about late 
April to November; exact dates depend on road and snow conditions. Azalea has an accessible 
campsite near accessible restrooms. All campsites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. 
The limit of stay is as noted below for all campgrounds from June 14 to September 14; the rest 
of the year the limit is 30 days. Campsites that can accommodate RVs more than 30 feet long 
are very limited. 

Group Campground: The group campgrounds, in Cedar Grove and Grant Grove, are open from 
about May to October; exact dates depend on road and snow conditions. Reservations are re- 
quired; write Canyon View Campground, Group Sites, Cedar Grove Ranger Station, Box 948, 
Kings Canyon National Park, CA 93633, or Sunset Campground, Group Sites, Grant Grove 
Ranger Station, Box 948, Kings Canyon National Park, CA 93633. Groups must include at least 
20 persons in Cedar Grove, 12-20 in Grant Grove. RVs up to 30 feet long are permitted. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed throughout most of the park. The 
park staff recommends camping from June through September. A backcountry permit is 
required. Reservations for a permit can be made beginning March 1 for the upcoming camping 
season; reservations must be made at least 14 days in advance and by mail. Some permits are also 
available at the park on a first-come, first-served basis throughout the summer camping season. 
Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: all Cedar 



30 



Grove campgrounds (Canyon View, Moraine, Sentinel, Sheep Creek) — hot showers, coin- 
operated laundry, gasoline station, horse rentals, snack bar, ranger programs; all Grant Grove 
campgrounds (Azalea, Crystal Springs, Sunset) — hot showers, gasoline station, restaurant, horse 
rentals, ranger programs. Campers are required to keep a clean camp and store their food to 
avoid attracting black bears. Cedar Grove campers must keep food in provided storage lockers. 
Grant Grove campers must store food in vehicles. Backcountry campers must hang food high 
from trees using the counterbalance method or use approved food storage. Fires are permitted 
only in designated fire rings or in campstoves. The maximum vehicle lengths permitted on the 
Generals Highway are 40 feet for a single vehicle and 50 feet for a combination vehicle. Most 
campgrounds permit a maximum of one vehicle and six people per site. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Azalea 
Canyon View 



Crystal Springs 



Moraine 



Sentinel 



Sheep Creek 



Sunset 



Group Campground 



Canyon View 



Sunset 



Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 



113 • • • 14 • • • • 


37 • • • 14 • •• • 


63 • • • 14 • •• • 


120 • • • 14 • • • • 


S3 • • • 14 • •• • 


111 • • • 14 • • • • 


200 • • • 14 • •• • 




4 • • • 14 • • • 


2 • • • 14 • •• • 




ltd • 



Lassen Volcanic National Park 
P.O. Box 100, Mineral, CA 96063 

Setting: The park abounds with violent volcanic history and peaceful camping settings. Lassen 
Peak, last erupted from 1914 to 1921, towers over a landscape of coniferous forests, alpine 
meadows, and mountain lakes intermixed with cinder cones, lava flows, and thermal springs. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open from about Memorial Day weekend through 
most of September; exact dates depend on road and snow conditions. All sites are available on 
a first-come, first-served basis. Manzanita Lake has wheelchair-accessible restrooms. 
Group Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open from about Memorial Day weekend through most 
of September; exact dates depend on road and weather conditions. Reservations are required; 
write the park. Campgrounds are for organized groups only. Each site accommodates 25 people. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park 
on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Manzanita 
Lake— hot showers, coin-operated laundry, gasoline, food service. Campers should keep a clean 
campsite and store food in vehicles, or, in the backcountry, hang food high from trees to avoid 
attracting black bears. Diesel fuel is not available in the park; it can be found, however, in 
Mineral and Shingletown. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Butte Lake 
Crags 
Juniper Lake 



98 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


45 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 




18 


• 




14 







31 



Lassen Volcanic continued 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Manzanita Lake 



Southwest (walk-in) 
Summit Lake-North 
Summit Lake-South 



Warner Valley 



Group Campgrounds 



Butte Lake 



Juniper Lake 



Lost Creek 



Bac kcountry Cam psites 

Various locations (hike-in) 



179 • • • 14 • • • • 


21 • • 14 • • • 


46 • • • 7 • • 


48 • • • 7 • 


18 • • • 14 • 




2 • • 14 • • 


1 • 14 


7 • • 7 • • 




ltd • 14 



Lava Beds National Monument 
P.O. Box 867, Tulelake, CA 96134 

Setting: From its vantage point on a volcanic slope, the park campground overlooks a terrain 
of massive lava flows and cinder cones. Below ground and out of sight are more than 200 lava 
tube caves. This wilderness of sagebrush and juniper was also the site of the Modoc War be- 
tween U.S. Army troops and native Modoc Indians. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 
Water and flush toilets are available from Memorial Day to Labor Day; the rest of the year 
water is available % mile away at the visitor center and pit toilets are provided at the camp- 
ground. The limit of stay is as noted below from spring through fall; it can be extended in the 
winter. Campsites for RVs more than 35 feet long are limited. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of the campground include: 
visitor center, evening campfire programs. No food, fuel, or other supplies are available in the 
park; the nearest are 30 miles away at Tulelake, California. Be prepared for unpredictable 
weather changes. Fires are permitted only in fireplaces provided or campstoves. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campground 

Indian Well 



45 



14 



Pinnacles National Monument 
Paicines, CA 95043 

Setting: Jagged pinnacles, spires, and other towering rock formations created by the erosion of 
remnants of an ancient volcanic eruption surround the camping area. The park lies on the 
earthquake-prone San Andreas Fault; the land to the west of the fault is moving slowly north- 
ward while the land to the east stands still. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 
The limit of stay is as noted below from February 1 to June 1 ; the rest of the year it is 14 days. 
All tent sites are walk-in sites. Two accessible sites are near wheelchair-accessible restrooms. 
The campground often fills up on weekends from February 15 to June 15; campers should arrive 
by early evening Friday to get a campsite. 

Special Notes: Shade is scarce. Rattlesnakes are prevalent in warm weather. Fires are permitted 
only in grills provided or campstoves. Firewood gathering is prohibited. In the summer daytime 
temperatures of 100°Fare common. 



32 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campground 

Chaparral ~ 20 • • 14 



Point Reyes National Seashore 
Point Reyes, CA 94956 

Setting: Point Reyes Peninsula, a coastal preserve that juts out into the Pacific Ocean, has 
camping areas scattered throughout its many acres of seaside bluffs, sandy beaches, wooded 
valleys, and grassy meadows. Campers often awaken to foggy mornings. Seals, sea lions, and 
many shorebirds, including terns, gulls, and murres, frequent the shoreline. 
Group Campground: See "Backcountry Campsites" below for information on a backcountry 
group site. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year at sites shown below. A back- 
country permit is required and is available from the park. Reservations can be made up to 60 days 
in advance by calling 415-663-1092, 9 a.m. to 12 noon, Monday through Friday. The limit of 
stay is 4 nights, no matter how many campgrounds you stay at. Each camping area has several 
sites that can accommodate up to 8 persons. Coast, Sky, and Wildcat also have sites that can 
accommodate 9 to 25 persons. 

Special Notes: Charcoal fires are permitted only in grills provided and campstoves or on the 
beach. The only wood fires permitted are driftwood fires on the beach. Potable water is avail- 
able only in the campgrounds. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Backcountry Campsites 

Coast (hike-in) 14 • • 



Glen (hike-in) 12 



Sky (hike-in) 12 



Wildcat (hike-in) 7 



Redwood National Park 
1111 Second Street, Crescent City, CA 95531 

Setting: Redwood trees, the tallest trees in the world with a record height of 367.8 feet, tower 
over campers in this Pacific coast preserve. Groves of virgin trees still stand. Where logging 
occurred, redwoods are returning in second-growth forests. A nurturing climate of abundant 
rain and fog and moderate temperatures prevails. Rivers and creeks crisscross the region. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: DeMartin, Flint Ridge, and Nickel Creek are open all year on a first- 
come, first-served basis. Gold Bluffs Beach and Elk Prairie in Prairie Creek Redwoods State 
Park, Jedediah Smith in Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park, and Mill Creek in Del Norte 
Coast Redwoods State Park are located within the national park boundary and are available 
for camping. All these campgrounds except Mill Creek are open all year; Mill Creek is open 
from May to October. Reservations through Mistix, a California-based ticket agency, are re- 
quired for all state campgrounds from about mid-May through August; the rest of the camping 
season they are on a first-come, first-served basis. Reservations can be made through Mistix by 
phone, 800-444-7275; by writing to: Mistix, P.O. Box 85705, San Diego, CA 92138-5705; or by 
stopping by a Mistix ticket outlet. Reservations can be made up to 8 weeks in advance; they 
must be made at least 48 hours in advance. The limit of stay at the state campgrounds is as noted 
below from June to September; the rest of the year it is 30 days. Trailers up to 27 feet long and 
motorhomes up to 31 feet are permitted at Jedediah Smith and Mill Creek. Trailers up to 24 feet 
long and motorhomes up to 27 feet are allowed at Prairie Creek. RVs longer than 20 feet are not 
permitted at Gold Bluffs Beach because the access road is narrow and winding. Wheelchair- 
accessible restrooms are at Jedediah Smith, Mill Creek, and Prairie Creek. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed at the sites shown below on a first- 
come, first-served basis. The park recommends camping from June through September. 

33 



Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Gold Bluffs Beach — solar showers; Jedediah Smith — hot showers, gasoline station, evening 
ranger programs; Mill Creek and Prairie Creek — hot showers, evening ranger programs. In 
state campgrounds, campers with dogs must have proof of rabies vaccination; additional fees 
are charged for dogs. Campers should keep a clean camp and store food in their vehicles, or, in 
the backcountry, hang it high from trees to avoid attracting black bears. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 

DeMartin (walk-in) 



Flint Ridge (walk-in) 

Gold Bluffs Beach (not NPS) 

Jedediah Smith (not NPS) 

Mill Creek (not NPS) 

Nickel Creek (walk-in) 
Prairie Creek (not NPS) 
Backcountry Campsites 
Redwood Creek (hike-in) 



10 • 




14 










10 • 




14 










25 • • 


• 


15 




• 






109 • • 


• 


15 




• 


• 


• 


145 • • 


• 


15 




• 


• 




10 • 




14 










75 • • 


• 


15 


• 


• 








ltd • 



Sequoia National Park 
Three Rivers, CA 93271 

Setting: Dwarfed in a natural world of gigantic dimensions, campers visit a land of giant sequoias, 
the largest living things on Earth and some of the oldest. The park lies in the shadow of 14,495- 
foot Mt. Whitney, one of a series of tall peaks in the Sierra Nevadas and the highest mountain 
in the lower 48 states. The park is adjacent to Kings Canyon National Park. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Lodgepole, Potwisha, and South Fork are open all year. Water is avail- 
able at South Fork only from April to November. Dorst is open from Memorial Day to Labor 
Day. Buckeye is open from April to mid-October. Atwell Mill and Cold Springs are open from 
late May to November; exact dates depend on road and snow conditions. Water is available 
from late May to mid-October. All campsites except those at Lodgepole are available on a 
first-come, first-served basis. Reservations are required for Lodgepole from mid-May through 
Labor Day; see pages 6-7 for details. Trailers are prohibited at Atwell Mill, Buckeye Flat, and 
Cold Springs because the access roads are narrow and steep. Those with trailers should not use 
South Fork because of a steep, narrow access road and limited turnaround room in the camp- 
ground. The limit of stay is as noted below for all campgrounds from June 14 to September 14; 
the rest of the year it is 30 days. Lodgepole has accessible restrooms and Potwisha has an ac- 
cessible site near accessible restrooms. Campgrounds fill up by early afternoon from mid-July 
to Labor Day. Campsites that can accommodate RVs more than 30 feet long are very limited. 
Lodgepole has a 32-foot limit. 

Group Campground: Dorst is open Memorial Day to Labor Day; exact dates depend on road 
and snow conditions. Reservations are required; write: Dorst Campground, Group Sites, Box C, 
Sequoia National Park, CA 93262. Groups must include at least 20 people. RV spaces are limited. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed throughout most of the park. The 
park staff recommends camping from June through September. A backcountry permit is 
required. Reservations for a permit can be made beginning March 1 for the upcoming camp- 
ing season; reservations must be made at least 14 days in advance and by mail. Some permits 
are also available at the park on a first-come, first-served basis throughout the summer. 
Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Potwisha— 
weekend ranger programs; Lodgepole — hot showers, coin-operated laundry, restaurant, gaso- 
line station, ranger programs. Campers are required to keep a clean campsite and store their 
food away to avoid attracting black bears. Food must be kept in provided storage lockers at all 
campgrounds. Backcountry campers should hang food high in trees using the counterbalance 
method or use approved food canisters. Fires are permitted only in designated fire rings or 



34 



campstoves. They may be prohibited in times of high fire danger. The maximum vehicle lengths 
permitted on the Generals Highway are 40 feet for a single vehicle and 50 feet for a combina- 
tion vehicle. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgr ounds 

Atwell Mill 



Buckeye Rat 



Cold Springs 



Dorst 



Lodgepole 



Potwisha 



South Fork 



23 


• i 


> 14 i 






• 


28 


• i 


1 14 i 


» • 


37 


• i 


1 14 i 




218 • 


• 4 


1 14 i 


1 • 


260 • 


• i 


> 14 i 


► • 


• 


• 


44 • 


• i 


> 14 i 


» • 


• 




13 


• i 


1 14 i 









Group Campground 



Dorst 



14 



Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 



ltd 



Whiskeytown-Shasta-Trinity National Recreation Area 
Whiskeytown Unit, P.O. Box 188, Whiskeytown, CA 96095 

Setting: Persons flock to the shores of Whiskeytown Lake for boating, swimming, waterskiing, 
fishing, and camping. In the mid-1800s, fortune hunters of the California Gold Rush came to 
this area after gold was discovered. Visitors can pan for gold for fun. Away from the lake, 
secluded chaparral and oak-pine woodlands in the surrounding hills provide places for back- 
country camping. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Brandy Creek is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. Only 
campers with self-contained RVs can stay at Brandy Creek because no restrooms are provided. 
Oak Bottom is also open all year. Reservations are recommended from May 15 to early Septem- 
ber; see pages 6-7 for details. The rest of the year the campground is on a first-come, first-served 
basis. All tent sites at Oak Bottom are walk-in. The limit of stay is as noted below for both 
campgrounds from May 15 to September 15; the rest of the year it is 30 days. Oak Bottom has 
accessible sites with wheelchair-accessible restrooms for RV campers. 

Group Campground: The campground is open seasonally. Reservations are required: call the 
park. The maximum number of persons allowed per site is 80. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park 
on a first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. The limit of stay is as 
noted below from May 15 to September 15; the rest of the year it is 30 days. 
Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Brandy 
Creek— cold showers, snack bar, marina; Oak Bottom— cold showers, snack bar, marina, boat 
rentals, evening ranger programs. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Brandy Creek 

Oak Bottom 

Group Campground 

Dry Creek 

Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in, 
4WD-in, high-clearance 
2WD-in) 



37 • 






14 


• 




• 




150 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


• 




2 • 


• 


• 


7 


• 










ltd 


• 




14 











35 



Yosemite National Park 
P.O. Box 577, Yosemite, CA 95389 

Setting: Just as Yosemite — "the Incomparable Valley" as it has been called — has inspired photog- 
raphers and painters, it, too, inspires the many campers who stay in this glacier-carved gorge 
of steep granite cliffs and domes and towering waterfalls. Beyond the valley, camping areas are 
scattered throughout the park's Sierra Nevada highcountry of forests, meadows, and alpine lakes. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: In Yosemite Valley: Lower Pines and Sunnyside are open all year; 
Upper Pines, from April through November; and Upper River, North Pines, Backpackers, and 
Lower River, April through October. Reservations, see pages 6-7 for details, are required for 
all Yosemite Valley campgrounds all year except Sunnyside and Backpackers. Sunnyside is 
available on a first-come, first-served basis all year. Backpackers is open for backpackers with 
wilderness permits before or after their trip or for bicyclists. In the rest of the park: Hodgdon 
Meadow and Wawona are open all year; Bridalveil Creek and White Wolf, from June through 
August; Yosemite Creek and Tenaya Lake, from June to September; Porcupine Flat, Tamarack 
Rat, and Tuolumne Meadows, from June through mid-October; and Crane Rat, from May 
through October. Reservations are required for Hodgdon Meadow from April through October 
and for Crane Rat and Tuolumne Meadows through the camping season; see pages 6-7 for 
details. The other campgrounds are on a first-come, first-served basis. Exact opening and clos- 
ing dates vary for campgrounds outside Yosemite Valley due to snow and road conditions. The 
limit of stay for all campgrounds is as noted below from June 1 to September 15; the rest of the 
year it is 30 days. Persons wanting to stay in Yosemite Valley campgrounds May through Sep- 
tember should make reservations early. The other campgrounds fill daily in July and August; 
persons should arrive by early afternoon to get a site during the week and before noon Friday 
to get a site for the weekend. 

Group Campgrounds: Yosemite Valley Group Campground is open May through September; 
reservations, see pages 6-7 for details, are required throughout the camping season. In the rest 
of the park: Hodgdon Meadow and Wawona are open all year; Tuolumne Meadows, from June 
through mid-October; and Bridalveil Creek, from June through September. Reservations are 
required for Hodgdon Meadow from April through October; the rest of the year it is on a first- 
come, first-served basis. Reservations are required for Tuolumne Meadows throughout the 
camping season. See pages 6-7 for details on reservations for Hodgdon Meadow and Tuolumne 
Meadows. For group reservations for Bridalveil Creek and Wawona, write Wawona District 
Office, P.O. Box 2027, Yosemite, CA 95389; reservations are required. All groups must include 
10 to 30 persons. A group can reserve a maximum of 2 campsites. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed throughout much of the park all year. 
A backcountry permit is required. Persons may make reservations for backcountry sites between 
February 1 and May 31 for the upcoming camping season; contact the park's Backcountry 
Office for application information. Many sites are also available on a first-come, first-served 
basis throughout the year. Camping parties may include up to 25 persons if camping near a 
trail; off-trail camping parties are limited to 8. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Yosemite Valley campgrounds (Backpackers, Lower Pines, Lower River, North Pines, Sunny- 
side, Upper Pines, Upper River) — hot showers, coin-operated laundry, restaurant, gasoline sta- 
tion (including diesel), horse, raft, bike, and evening ranger programs; Bridalveil Creek- 
evening ranger program; Crane Rat— gasoline station, evening ranger programs; Tuolumne 
Meadows— hot showers, gasoline station, horse rentals, evening ranger programs; Wawona— 
gasoline station, horse rentals, evening ranger programs; White Wolf— hot showers, horse 
rentals, evening ranger programs. Fires are permitted only in existing fire rings or campstoves. 
No fires are permitted above 9,600 feet. Collecting firewood is prohibited all year in Yosemite 
Valley. Campers should keep a clean camp and store food in storage boxes provided, in a vehicle 
or, in the backcountry, hang food high from trees or provided wires or poles to avoid attracting 
black bears. 



36 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Backpackers (walk-in) 
Bridalveil Creek 
Crane Flat 
Hodgdon Meadow 
Lower Pines 
Lower River 
North Pines 
Porcupine Flat 
Sunnyside (walk-in) 
Tamarack Flat 
Tenaya Lake (walk-in) 
Tuolumne Meadows 
Upper Pines 



Upper River 



Wawona 



White Wolf 



Yosemite Creek 



Group Campgrounds 

Bridalveil Creek (walk-in) 

Hodgdon Meadow (walk-in) 

Tuolumne Meadows 
(walk-in) 

Wawona (walk-in) 

Yosemite Valley (walk-in) 

Backcountry Campsites 



Various locations (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 



25 • • 2 • • • 


110 • • • 14 • • 


166 • • • 14 • • • 


105 • • • 14 • • 


172 • • • 7 • • • 


13.S • • • 7 • •• • 


85 • • • 7 • • • 


52 • • • 14 


35 • • 7 • • • 


52 • • 14 


50 • • 14 • • 


314 • • • 14 • • • • 


238 • • • 7 • •• • 


124 • • 7 • • • 


100 • • • 14 • • • 


87 • • • 14 • • 


75 • • 14 




1 • • 14 • • 


4 • • 14 • • 


8 • • 14 • •• • 


1 • • 14 • • • 


11 • • 7 • •• • 




ltd • 



37 



Colorado 

Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Monument 
2233 East Main, Montrose, CO 81401 

Setting: The main camping areas are located at an elevation of about 8,200 feet near the rim of 
the Black Canyon, a 2, (XX)- foot-deep, dark gorge carved by the Gunnison River. Backcountry 
campers can stay in the canyon, which, according to one observer, has a combination of "depth, 
narrowness, sheerness, and somber countenance" unmatched by any canyon in North America. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open from about mid-April through October; exact 
dates for North Rim depend on road and snow conditions. All campsites are available on a 
first-come, first-served basis. Water is provided only from mid- or late May through September; 
when available, water should be used sparingly because it has to be hauled in from outside. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is available from about mid-April through Octo- 
ber in Black Canyon on a first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. 
Special Notes: Large RVs may have difficulty traveling the dirt access road to North Rim when 
it is wet; call the park for up-to-date road conditions. Services available seasonally within 1 
mile of camping areas include: South Rim — visitor center, evening ranger programs. Fires are 
permitted only in grills provided or campstoves; below the canyon rims fires are permitted only 
in campstoves. Firewood gathering is prohibited; bring your own fuel. Visitors should watch 
their step at the canyon's edge; parents should supervise children closely. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 



North Rim 



South Rim 



14 • 


• 




14 


• 




102 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 




12 


• 




7 







Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in) 



Colorado National Monument 
Fruita, CO 81521 

Setting: From Saddlehorn Campground or the nearby visitor center, enjoy a colorful pano- 
rama of deep, sheer-sided canyons, high rock towers, forested mesas, and distant mountains. 
The park's 23-mile Rim Rock Drive offers a basic introduction to the area's natural and human 
histories. Opportunities for a more intimate acquaintance abound in off-road areas. Along the 
way, watch for mule deer, golden eagles, desert bighorn sheep, coyotes, and mountain lions. 
Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. Each 
site offers, during the warmer months, convenient access to water taps and fully-plumbed rest- 
rooms. During the cooler months, get drinking water at the visitor center (fa mile) and expect 
vault toilets in the campground. It is often full on summer holiday weekends. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is permitted throughout the park except within 
V^-mile of developed areas and roads. Open fires are prohibited, but cooking is permissible over 
properly shielded campstoves. Advance registration is strongly encouraged. Pack in drinking 
water and pack out all refuse. 

Special Notes: Evening campfire programs on a variety of topics are offered nightly in the camp- 
ground amphitheater during the summer. The nearby visitor center features an introductory AV 
program, exhibits, and information desk, and sales area with books, maps, and other materials. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 



Saddlehorn 80 • • • \4 



Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in, open 

horseback ride-in) 

38 



Curecanti National Recreation Area 
102 Elk Creek, Gunnison, CO 81230 

Setting: Three man-made lakes along the Gunnison River— Blue Mesa, Crystal Lake, and Mor- 
row Point Lake — are the delight of trout and salmon fishermen and boaters as well as campers. 
The main camping areas are located amid mesas and canyons along Blue Mesa, which is the 
largest of the lakes, its lake tributaries, and the Gunnison River. Backcountry camping is per- 
mitted along each lake. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Cimarron and Elk Creek are open all year, weather permitting. Water 
and flush toilets are available from late May to mid-September; the rest of the year pit toilets 
are provided and water is available x k mile away at visitor centers. The rest of the campgrounds 
are open from May to October; exact dates depend on snow and road conditions. All sites are 
available on a first-come, first-served basis. Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are provided in 
all campgrounds. 

Group Campground: The campground is open from May to October. Reservations are required; 
contact the park. The site is only for organized groups of 10 to 50 persons. Wheelchair-accessible 
restrooms are available. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed in designated areas along the lake- 
shores on a first-come, first-served basis; exact dates depend on the lakes' ice conditions. 
Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Cimarron, Lake Fork, and Stevens Creek— evening ranger programs; Elk Creek — hot show- 
ers, restaurant, evening ranger programs. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Cimarron 

Dry Gulch 

East Portal 

Elk Creek ~ 

Gateview 

Lake Fork 

Ponderosa 

Red Creek 

Stevens Creek 

Group Campground 

East Elk Creek 

Backcountry Campsites 
Boat-in campsites (boat-in) 



22 • 


• 


• 14 • 


• 


• 


• 


10 • 


• 


• 14 • 








15 • 


• 


• 14 • 








179 • 


• 


• 14 • 


• 


• 


• 


7 • 


• 


14 • 








87 • 


• 


• 14 • 


• 


• 


• 


21 • 


• 


• 14 • 








7 • 


• 


• 14 • 








54 • 


• 


• 14 • 






• 




2 • 


• 


• 14 • 










10 


• 


14 









Dinosaur National Monument Camping in Colorado and 

P.O. Box 210, Dinosaur, CO 81610 Utah 

Setting: In a park where prehistoric dinosaurs reigned 140 million years ago and where paleon- 
tologists continue to search for and find their ancient fossil bones, campers can contemplate 
the mysteries of the past. They can also enjoy the wild beauty of the Green and Yampa Rivers, 
and their canyons, either from shore or on a float trip. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Split Mountain is open all year. Flush toilets and water are provided in 
the summer; water is not available the rest of the year and pit toilets are provided. Gates of 
Lodore is open all year. Deerlodge Park and Green River are open from about mid-May to 
mid-September; exact dates depend on road and snow conditions. All sites are available on a 
first-come, first-served basis. 

Backcountry Campsites: Echo Park and Rainbow Park are open in the summer; exact dates 
depend on road and snow conditions. They are open on a first-come, first-served basis. Camp- 
ing in the rest of the backcountry is allowed all year; a backcountry permit is required. The 
limit of stay varies with location. 



39 



Special Notes: The only place where fossils can be seen are at Dinosaur Quarry Visitor Center; 
the nearest campgrounds are Green River and Split Mountain, both about 5 miles away. Ser- 
vices available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Split Mountain — evening 
ranger programs. A permit is required for boating in the park. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/R V Campgroun ds 

Deerlodge Park 
Gates of Lodore 



Green River 



Split Mountain 



Backcountry Campsites 



Echo Park (high-clearance 
2WD-in) 

Rainbow Park (high- 
clearance 2WD-in) 

Other locations (hike-in, 
boat-in) 



10 • 


• 




15 






17 • 


• 




15 


• 




99 • 


• 


• 


15 


• 


• 


35 • 


• 


• 


15 


• 


• 




15 • 


• 




15 






2 • 


• 




15 






open 


• 




varies 







Great Sand Dunes National Monument 
11500 Highway 50, Mosca, CO 81146 

Setting: The 700-foot-high Great Sand Dunes— North America's tallest dunes— loom over the 
most popular camping areas. Backcountry campers can spend a night among the windblown 
sands on the dunes, as well as at other isolated sites near the dunes. The steep-rising Sangre de 
Cristo Mountains dominate the eastern horizon. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground with full facilities is open from early April through 
October on a first-come, first-served basis. Winter camping is available with no water. Each site 
is limited to six people. Primitive camping is available in winter. Sites fill almost every weekend 
during summer. Some sites can accommodate RVs up to 60 feet long. An accessible site is 
available near a wheelchair-accessible restroom. 

Group Campground: The campground is open from April through October. Reservations are 
required; call the park 719-378-2312. Sites accommodate 25 to 50 persons. An accessible site is 
available near an wheelchair-accessible restroom. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed year-round on a first-come, first- 
served basis. A free backcountry permit is required, available at the visitor center. 
Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Pinyon Flats— visitor center, evening ranger programs. Fires are permitted only in grills pro- 
vided or campstoves. Firewood gathering is prohibited. In summer shoes should be worn when 
on the hot dunes sand. In a thunderstorm, seek low ground; get off the dunes if possible. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campground 



Pinyon Rats 



Group Campground 



Pinyon Flats 



Backcountry Campsites 

Backpacker Campsites 
(hike-in) 

Other locations (hike-in) 



88 



14 



14 



open 



40 



Mesa Verde National Park 
Mesa Verde National Park, CO 81330 

Setting: The ancient Anasazi Indians who built the impressive prehistoric villages of cliff dwell- 
ings called Mesa Verde hunted game and grew crops of corn, beans, and squash on the 7,000- 
to 8,000-foot-high plateau where the camping areas are located. The Anasazi lived here until 
1300 A.D. From the plateau, there are panoramic views of the Four Corners, where four states 
come together. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground, 4 miles and 15 minutes from the park entrance, is 
open from mid- April to mid-October on a first-come, first-served basis; exact dates depend on 
road and snow conditions. Six accessible campsites are located near wheelchair-accessible 
restrooms. Sites will accommodate tents, trailers, and motor homes. Only 15 sites have full 
hookups. Each site has a picnic table and fireplace with grill. The campground rarely fills. It is 
suggested, however, that you arrive early in the day for a good site selection; the peak season is 
in July and August. 

Group Campground: The campground is open from mid- April to mid-October on a first-come, 
first-served basis. Reservations can be made through ARA Mesa Verde Co., P.O. Box 277, 
Mancos, CO 81328. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Morefield— hot showers, coin-operated laundry, gasoline station, snack bar, firewood, evening 
ranger programs. Firewood gathering is prohibited. Backcountry hiking is not allowed. Three 
daytime hiking trails are at Morefield Campground; hiking information is available at the More- 
field Ranger Station or at the entrance to the campground. Diesel fuel is available at Far View 
Terrace. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 



Morefield 477 • • • 14 

Group Campground 



Morefield 17 • • #14 



Rocky Mountain National Park 
Estes Park, CO 80517 

Setting: A broad spectrum of camping experiences is possible in the glacial landscape of the 
Rocky Mountains, with its valleys, its highlands of pine, fir, and spruce forests, its alpine mead- 
ows, its clear streams, and its crystal lakes. Elevations range from 7,800 to 14,255 feet. Bighorn 
sheep, elk, deer, coyotes, marmots, and ptarmigan find refuge in the park. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Reservations are needed at Moraine Park and Glacier Basin camp- 
grounds from June through September. See pages 6-7 for detailed information. Longs Peak, 
Aspenglen, and Timber Creek are first-come, first-served. Three campgrounds— usually Moraine 
Park, Longs Peak, and Timber Creek— are open year round. Limit of state is as shown below 
June through September; camping nights are extended an additional 15 days October through 
May. Water and flush toilets are available May through September. Moraine Park, Glacier 
Basin, and Timber Creek have wheelchair-accessible restrooms. Fees are charged only when 
water is available. 

Group Campground: The campground is open from early June to September. Reservations are 
required; see pages 6-7 for details. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park. 
A backcountry permit is required. Designated backcountry campsites and crosscountry camp- 
sites are designed for smaller camping parties; some are open to horseback riders. Bivouac 
camps are restricted to use by technical mountain climbers; no tents are allowed. There is a 
special site for disabled persons called Handi-camp, which is reached via a sometimes steep 
Vrmile hard-surfaced access trail. The site accommodates 10 persons. An accessible restroom 
is provided. Reservations can be made for many backcountry sites by writing or appearing in 
person at the park throughout the year, or, from October through May, by calling the park at 

41 



303-586-4459. The limit of stay for all backcountry areas is as noted below from June through 
September; the rest of the year it is extended by 15 days. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Aspenglen — evening ranger programs; Glacier Basin — horse rentals, evening ranger programs; 
Moraine Park — horse rentals, museum, evening ranger programs; Timber Creek — evening 
ranger programs. All campgrounds— firewood, ice, bottled water sales during the summer. 
Fires are permitted only in grills provided or campstoves. Lightning can be a serious hazard; 
avoid high exposed areas during storms. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/R V Campgrounds 

Aspenglen 

Glacier Basin 

Longs Peak 

Moraine Park 

Timber Creek 

Group Campground 

Glacier Basin 

Backcountry Campsites 

Bivouac Camps (climb-in) 

Crosscountry campsites 
(hike-in) 

Designated backcountry sites 
(hike-in, horseback ride-in) 

Group Campsites (hike-in) 

Handi-camp (trail access) 



54 


• 


• i 


I 7 • • 


150 


• 


• i 


> 7 






• 


26 




• i 


> 3 • • 


247 


• 


• < 


> 7 






• 


100 


• 


• i 


» 7 






• 




14 




• • 7 


• 


• 






ltd 






7 








40 




• 


7 








201 




• 


7 








19 




• 


7 








1 




• 


3 









42 






Rocky Mountain: A chance to savor grandeur. 




■ -O' 




&m* : . ,^r"'" 



Florida 

Biscayne National Park 
P.O. Box 1369, Homestead, FL 33090 

Setting: Subtropical islands of the Florida Keys provide remote camping areas not far from the 
city of Miami. Brown pelicans, herons, and other sea birds populate the islands' tropical for- 
ests, while offshore dazzling fishes inhabit crystal clear Biscayne Bay and undersea coral reefs 
in the Atlantic. The islands are 7 miles off the Florida mainland. Island access is by boat only. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: The campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 
Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are available at both campgrounds. 
Group Campground: The campground is open all year. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout most of Elliott 
Key on a first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. 
Special Notes: Although camping is permitted all year, mosquito infestations during the 
summer can make camping unbearable; contact the park for up-to-date information. During 
the winter months commercial tour boats ferry passengers to Elliott Key from Convoy Point 
on the park mainland; contact the park for information. At Boca Chita, private boats may tie 
up at the sea wall in Boca Chita harbor; at Elliott Key they may dock in the 66 slips in Elliott 
Key harbor or anchor offshore; and at Sands Key they may tie up along shore in "the Keyhole" 
or anchor offshore. Services available seasonally or all year in the camping areas include: Elliott 
Key— cold showers (handicapped-accessible), visitor center. No food, fuel, or other supplies 
are available on the islands; the nearest are 7 miles away by boat on the mainland. Campers 
must pack out all trash. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 



ltd 


• 


14 




• 


ltd 


• 


14 


• 


• 




1 


• 


14 








ltd 


• 


14 







Boca Chita Key (boat-in) 

Elliott Key (boat-in) 

Group Campground 

Elliott Key (boat-and hike-in) 

Backcountry Campsites 

Elliott Key (boat-in, boat- 
and-hike-in) 



Everglades National Park 
P.O. Box 279, Homestead, FL 33030 

Setting: Sanctuary for alligators and crocodiles, the Florida panther, a myriad of birds, and 
many tropical plants, the watery expanse of the Everglades also serves as a refuge for campers. 
Most campers stay in camping areas on the coast of Florida Bay or in an inland pine forest. 
Backcountry campers can stay in more isolated areas of this subtropical wilderness. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. Fla- 
mingo has 60 walk-in tent sites. The limit of stay is as noted below from November to May; the 
rest of the year it is 30 days. Each campground has one site reserved for the disabled next to a 
wheelchair-accessible restroom. The Christmas/New Year and Easter holidays are the busiest 
times of the year, and campgrounds are normally filled by mid-day. No overflow camping is 
permitted. Campgrounds frequently fill completely from January through March. Arrive by 
mid-morning to get a site. 

Group Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year. Reservations are required; contact the 
park. Each campsite accommodates up to 15 persons. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park 
on a first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. In watery areas, desig- 
nated campsites are on wooden platforms called chickees. One campsite— Pearl Bay Chickee— is 
accessible to the disabled. The limit of stay for backcountry sites varies with location. 



44 






Special Notes: The park staff strongly recommends against camping at Flamingo or in many 
areas of the backcountry from April through November because of seasonal mosquito infesta- 
tions. Campers should come prepared for mosquitoes all year; bring insect repellent, bug-proof 
tent netting, long pants, long-sleeved shirts, and a cover for your head. Services available sea- 
sonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: Flamingo— cold showers, coin- 
operated laundry, restaurant, gasoline station, marina, boat rentals, boat tours, evening ranger 
programs; Long Pine Key— evening ranger programs. Wildlife is most easily seen in winter. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Te nt/RV Campgrounds 

Flamingo 



Long Pine Key 



Group Campgrounds 



Flamingo 



Long Pine Key 



Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in, 
bike-in, boat-in) 



300 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


• 


107 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 






4 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 




• 


1 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 








ltd 


• 




varies 











Fort Jefferson National Monument 
P.O. Box 6208, Key West, FL 33040 

Setting: Far off the beaten track, this camping area is located in the Dry Tortugas, a collection 
of subtropical islands 70 miles west of Key West, Florida. Fort Jefferson, the largest of America's 
19th-century coastal forts, is preserved here. Campers stay on Garden Key next to the fort. 
A tern nesting sanctuary and undersea coral reefs are nearby. Park access is by boat or 
seaplane. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year on Garden Key on a first- 
come, first-served basis. Groups of more than 10 people should request, in advance, an appli- 
cation for a special use permit. Boaters also can anchor offshore and spend the night. 
Special Notes: Reservations can be made with private charter boats and seaplanes for trans- 
portation to the park from Key West and other south Florida areas all year; contact the park for 
information. No drinking water, food, boat fuel, or other supplies are available in the park; the 
nearest are in Key West. Campers must carry out all trash. Fires are permitted only in grills 
provided or campstoves. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Backcountry Campsites 

Garden Key (boat-in, fly-in) 



10 



14 



Gulf Islands National Seashore See also Mississippi 

1801 Gulf Breeze Parkway, Gulf Breeze, FL 32561 

Setting: Campers share Santa Rosa Island, one of a chain of barrier islands off the Florida 

mainland in the Gulf of Mexico, with great blue herons, terns, brown pelicans, and other sea 

birds, skunks, and raccoons. Offshore, gamefish abound. Forests of live oak and pine shade the 

camping areas. Fort Pickens, a 19th-century coastal fort, is nearby. A toll bridge links the island 

to the mainland. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Electrical hookups are available for RVs at 135 sites. A special area of the campground is set 

aside for campers with pets; space is limited. The limit of stay is as noted below from March 

through October; the rest of the year it is 30 days. Several campsites near a wheelchair-acces- 



45 



sible restroom are held until at least noon each day for disabled campers. Demand for campsites 
is great near Easter and in the summer; the park advises arriving early in the week to get a site. 
Group Campgrounds: The campgrounds are open all year. Reservations are required; contact 
the park. Each site accommodates up to 50 persons. The limit of stay is as noted below from 
March through December; the rest of the year it is 30 days. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Ft. Pickens (tent/RV campground) — hot showers, lifeguarded beach; Ft. Pickens (group 
campground) — cold showers, lifeguarded beach. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 



Ft. Pickens 200 • ♦ • 14 

Group Campground 



Ft. Pickens 1 • • 14 



Naval Live Oaks 1 • • 14 



46 



Georgia 

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park 
P.O. Box 2128, Fort Oglethorpe, GA 30742 

Setting: The hills and valleys along Chickamauga Creek that are the setting for the camping 
area were the scene of a decisive Civil War battle in the fall of 1863. It was here that Union 
troops gained control of the city of Chattanooga, Tennessee, a key southern rail center and 
gateway to the heart of the Confederacy. Cannons and monuments surround the camping area. 
Group Campground: The campground is open all year. Reservations are required; call the 
park. The campground is primarily for scout groups and educational groups. Sites accommo- 
date 10 to 30 campers. One accessible site is located near an accessible toilet. 
Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of the campground include: South 
Post— ranger programs (on request only). Climbing on historical objects is prohibited. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Group Campground 



South Post 10 • • 10 



Cumberland Island National Seashore 
P.O. Box 806, St. Marys, GA 31558 

Setting: While on primitive Cumberland Island, a camper's neighborhood is one of wide sandy 
beaches, dunes, salt marshes, and dense maritime oak forests. The 16-mile-long barrier island, 
which is located 3 miles off Georgia's mainland shore, provides habitat for whitetail deer, 
waterbirds, alligators, wild turkeys, and other island wildlife. Park access is by boat and 
passenger ferry only. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year. Reservations are required; call the 
park. Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are available. 

Group Campground: The campground is open all year. Reservations are required; call the park. 
Each group site accommodates up to 15 persons. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year at sites shown below. Reser- 
vations are required; call the park. Each backcountry area accommodates up to 20 persons. 
Special Notes: A passenger boat from St. Marys, Georgia, ferries visitors to the island all year. 
The boat runs daily from March 15 to October 1; from October 1 to March 15 it runs Thursday 
through Monday. Private boaters planning to stay at SeaCamp may unload gear at the SeaCamp 
dock and then anchor offshore. Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas 
include: SeaCamp— cold showers. No food, fuel, or other supplies are provided on the island; 
the nearest are 7 miles away by boat in St. Marys. Pets are not allowed in the park. Fires are 
permitted only in grills provided or campstoves. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 

SeaCamp (hike-in) 

Group Campground 

SeaCamp (hike-in) 

Backcountry Campsites 

Brick Hill Bluff (hike-in) ~ 
Hickory Hill (hike-in) 
Stafford Beach (hike-in) 
Yankee Paradise (hike-in) 



16 


• 


7 


• 


• 




2 


• 


7 


• 


• 




ltd 


• 


7 






ltd 


• 


7 






10 


• 


7 






ltd 


• 


7 







47 



Hawaii 

Haleakala National Park 
P.O. Box 369, Makawao, HI 96768 

Setting: Campers stay either amid the volcanic, desert-like landscape of lava ash flows and cin- 
der cones of Haleakala Crater or in the contrasting lush green coastal areas of grasslands and 
rainforests. No eruptions have occurred since the late 1700s. Colorful tropical birdlife, much 
of it unique to the Hawaiian Islands, can be found here on this Maui island preserve. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. Hos- 
mer Grove accommodates up to 25 persons; Oheo Gulch accommodates up to 50. Each camp- 
ing party is limited to a maximum of 15 persons. Wheelchair-accessible toilets are available 
at Oheo Gulch. 

Backcountry Campsites: Holua and Paliku are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 
A backcountry permit is required. Each site accommodates up to 25 persons. Camping parties 
are limited to 15 persons. Holua Cabin, Kapalaoa Cabin, and Paliku Cabin each have a primi- 
tive cabin available all year. Each cabin is equipped with bunk beds, woodstove, and cooking 
utensils and accommodates up to 12 persons. Persons must apply for a cabin 3 months in advance 
by writing the park; cabins are assigned in a lottery drawing 2 months in advance. Occasionally 
drinking water is not available at backcountry sites; check with the park for up-to-date infor- 
mation. The limit of stay noted below is for each specific backcountry site; the total permitted 
length of stay in the backcountry is 3 nights per month. 

Special Notes: Food, fuel, and other supplies are not available in the park; the nearest are 
more than 15 miles away in Pukalani and Makawao, Maui. Services available all year within 1 
mile of camping areas include: Oheo Gulch — swimming at natural mountain pools. (No life- 
guards are provided; swimming is prohibited in these pools when flooded). Campers should be 
prepared for variable weather conditions, including intensely sunny days, hailstorms, rain, high 
winds, and near-freezing temperatures. Fires are permitted only in grills provided, woodstoves, 
or campstoves. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 



Hosmer Grove 



Oheo Gulch 



Backcountry Campsites 

Holua (hike-in, horseback 
ride-in) 

Holua Cabin (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 



ltd • 


• 




3 


• 


ltd • 


• 




3 






ltd 


• 




2 


• 


ltd 




• 


2 


• 


ltd 




• 


2 


• 


ltd 


• 




2 


• 


ltd 




• 


2 


• 



Kapalaoa Cabin (hike-in) 

Paliku (hike-in, horseback 
ride-in) 

Paliku Cabin (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 



Hawaii Volcanoes National Park 
Hawaii National Park, HI 96718 

Setting: From a distance, campers may experience an eruption of Mauna Loa or Kilauea, two 
of the most active volcanoes on Earth and the main attractions of this Hawaii island park. Fiery 
eruptions of lava occurred as recently as 1987. From the coast to the summit of the two vol- 
canic mountains are sandy beaches, tropical rainforests, and lava-covered slopes. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 
Handicapped-accessible restrooms are available at Kamoamoa and Namakani Paio. 



48 



Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year at sites shown below on a 
first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. Each party of backcountry 
campers is limited to 12 persons. Mauna Loa Summit, Pepeiao, and Red Hill Cabins each have 
a primitive sheltering cabin with bunk beds. The rest of the campgrounds, except Napau 
Crater, have 3-sided camping shelters. Shelter is not provided at Napau Crater. 
Special Notes: Services available all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: Namakani 
Paio— restaurant, golf course. Campers and hikers should avoid wandering off trails into 
unknown areas, where deep cracks in the Earth's surface pose dangers. Campers should be 
prepared for variable weather conditions, including intensely sunny days, high winds, heavy 
rains, and, in higher elevations, subfreezing temperatures. Elevations rise higher than 13,000 
feet; altitude sickness occurs often. Water at campsites is treated periodically but cannot be 
considered potable at all times. Treating by boiling or purification tablets is recommended. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Kamoamoa 
Kipuka Nene 

Namakani Paio 

Backcountry Campsites 



Halape (hike-in) 



Kaaha (hike-in) 



Keauhou (hike-in) 



Mauna Loa Summit Cabin 
(hike-in) 

Napau Crater (hike-in) 

Pepeiao Cabin (hike-in) 

Red Hill Cabin (hike-in) 



ltd • i 


> 7 


• 


• 


ltd • i 


> 7 


• 




ltd • i 


> 7 


• 


• 






ltd i 


> 7 


• 




ltd i 


> 7 


• 




ltd i 


> 7 


• 




ltd i 


> 7 


• 




ltd i 


» 7 


ltd i 


» 7 


• 




ltd i 


1 7 


• 





49 



Idaho 



Craters of the Moon: An otherworldly place to spend the night. 




Craters of the Moon National Monument 
P.O. Box 29, Arco, ID 83213 

Setting: Camp settings are in the heart of what has been called an outdoor museum of volca- 
nism and the strangest 83 square miles on the North American continent. The stark terrain 
consists of lava flows and cinder cones created during more than 15,000 years of eruptions that 
ended 2,000 years ago. Mule deer, prairie falcons, marmots, and other wildlife inhabit this 
volcanic landscape. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open from mid-April to mid-October on a first- 
come, first-served basis; exact dates depend on road and snow conditions. Water and flush 
toilets are available from mid-May through September; the rest of the year water is not avail- 
able and pit toilets are provided. 

Group Campground: The campground is open from June through August. Reservations are 
required; contact the park. The site accommodates up to 30 persons and 8 vehicles. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is permitted throughout much of the park's 
designated wilderness area. A backcountry permit is required. 

Special Notes: No food, fuel, or other supplies are available in the park; the nearest are 18 
miles away in Arco, Idaho. Charcoal fires are permitted in grills or campstoves; wood fires are 
prohibited. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campground 

Lava Flow 

Group Campground 
Lava Row 
Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in) 



51 



14 



open 



50 



Kentucky 



Mammoth Cave: A camping trip tests outdoor skills. 





Cumberland Gap National Historical Park Camping in Kentucky, 

P.O. Box 1848, Middlesboro, KY 40965 Tennessee, and Virginia 

Setting: The Wilderness Road, the historic route through the Appalachian Mountains that Dan- 
iel Boone and other pioneers followed on their way west in the 1700s, winds past the main 
camping area. Several more isolated backcountry camping areas are perched along a high ridge 
in the mountains. Dense oak-hickory forests predominate throughout the region. 
Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. A 
few handicapped-accessible sites are available. 

Group Campground: The campground is open from late spring to late fall. Reservations are 
required; call the park. The largest site accommodates 42 persons; most hold 12. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year at sites shown below on a 
first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. 

Special Notes: Services available within the campground include: Wilderness Road— hot show- 
ers, firewood, evening campfire programs. Services available all year within 2 miles of the camp- 
ground include: gasoline, diesel fuel, and a coin-operated laundry. A shuttle bus operates 
seasonally from the visitor center for an interpretive tour of the Hensley Settlement; reserva- 
tions recommended, fee. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campground 

Wilderness Road 

Group Campground 

Wilderness Road 

Backcountry Campsites 

Chadwell Gap (hike-in) 

Gibson Gap (hike-in) 

Hensley Horse Camp (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 

Martins Fork (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 

White Rocks (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 



112 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


• 




13 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


• 




4 


• 




14 










2 


• 




14 










1 


• 




14 










8 


• 




14 










4 


• 




14 











51 



Mammoth Cave National Park 
Mammoth Cave, KY 42259 

Setting: The main camping areas are located in oak-hickory forests throughout the hilly karst 
limestone landscape that overlies Mammoth Cave, part of a 330-mile cave system renowned 
as the longest cave network in the world. Backcountry campers can stay in many areas, includ- 
ing the valleys of the Green and Nolin Rivers on river floodplains and islands. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. Two 
handicapped sites at Headquarters Campground, located near accessible restrooms, are held 
until 6 p.m. each day for handicapped campers during the summer. 

Group Campground: The campground is open all year. Reservations are required; contact the 
Chief Ranger's office. Each site is limited to 24 persons. Three sites are equipped to accommo- 
date horses; 8 horses are allowed per site. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year at designated sites on a first- 
come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally in the Headquarters area include: hot showers, 
coin-operated laundry, and campstore. The visitor center where cave tours begin is open all 
year except December 25. Ticks and poisonous snakes are prevalent in warm weather. Diesel 
fuel is not available in the park but is sold nearby. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Dennison Ferry (high- 
clearance 2WD-in) 

Headquarters 



Houchins Ferry 



Group Campground 



Maple Springs 



Backcountry Campsites 

River campsites (boat-in) 

Other locations (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 



4 • 14 


111 • • • 14 • • • • 


12 • • 14 • 




6 • • • 14 • 




ltd • 14 


11 • 14 



52 



Maine 

Acadia National Park 
P.O. Box 177, Bar Harbor, ME 04609 

Setting: Coastal forests shelter campers on Mount Desert Island, where the cold Atlantic 
meets the most mountainous terrain on the East Coast of the United States. The high point is 
Cadillac Mountain, which rises 1,530 feet above the waves. A backcountry camping area is 
located on Isle au Haut, one of many rocky islands off the Maine coast. Seals and sea birds 
visit the park. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Blackwoods is open all year. Flush toilets are available from May 
through mid-October; pit toilets are provided the rest of the year. Reservations can be made 
for the period from June 15 to September 15; see pages 6-7 for details. The rest of the year 
Blackwoods is on a first-come, first-served basis. Seawall is open from Memorial Day through 
September on a first-come, first-served basis. It has several walk-in tent sites. The limit of stay 
for both campgrounds is as noted below from May 15 through October 15; the rest of the year 
it is 30 days. Each campsite is limited to 6 persons and 1 vehicle. Both campgrounds have a few 
wheelchair-accessible sites near accessible restrooms. The campgrounds usually fill up by early 
afternoon from July through mid-September. 

Group Campgrounds: Blackwoods is open from mid-May through mid-October. Seawall is open 
from Memorial Day through September. Reservations are required for both campgrounds; con- 
tact the park. Each campground has sites that accommodate up to 20 persons. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed from mid-May to mid-October at site 
shown below. Reservations are required; contact the park. A reservation fee is charged; there 
is no daily camping fee. The limit of stay is as noted below between June 15 and September 15; 
from May 15 to June 15 and from September 15 to October 15 the limit is 5 days. Camping is 
restricted to lean-to shelters provided; no tents are permitted. 

Special Notes: A private mail/passenger boat ferries campers to the backcountry camping area 
on Isle au Haut from Stonington, Maine. From mid-June through August the boat lands within 
Vio mile of the camping area; at other times the boat lands 4 miles away. The boat does not run 
on Sundays or holidays. Contact the park for transportation information. Services available 
seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Blackwoods and Seawall— hot showers, coin- 
operated laundry, general store, and evening ranger programs. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 



Blackwoods 



Seawall 



Group Campgrounds 



Blackwoods 



Seawall 



Backcountry Campsites 

Isle au Haut— shelters 
provided (boat-and-hike-in) 



304 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


212 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 




5 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


5 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 




5 




• 


3 


• 







53 



Maryland 

Antietam National Battlefield 
P.O. Box 158, Sharpsburg, MD 21782 

Setting: Amid the fields, woods, and farmlands of Antietam Battlefield, campers may be able 
to imagine the events of September 17, 1862, the single bloodiest day of the Civil War. More 
than 23,000 Union and Confederate troops were killed or wounded on that day. Antietam 
Creek runs along the edge of the camping area and Burnside Bridge, the park's best known 
landmark, is nearby. 

Group Campground: The campground is open from March through October. Reservations are 
required; contact the park. The sites are for organized groups only. 

Special Notes: Campers should bring firewood. Sites have little or no shade. Fires are permit- 
ted only in designated fire rings or campstoves. Ticks and chiggers infest the area in the sum- 
mer; bring insect repellent. Campers should bring water containers; drinking water is available 
in the rear of the visitor center about IV2 miles from the campground. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Group Campground 

Rohrback ~T~ • ~T~ • 



Assateague Island National Seashore 
7206 National Seashore Lane, Berlin, MD 21811 

Setting: For campers, Assateague Island is a gateway to white sandy beaches along the Atlan- 
tic Ocean, dunes, pine forests, salt marshes, and sheltered coves on Chincoteague Bay. The 
37-mile-long barrier island, located off Maryland and Virginia's mainland, is a favorite haunt of 
nesting shorebirds and migrating waterfowl. Several bands of wild ponies roam the island. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Camping is available all year. Sites are on a reservation basis from 
May 15 through September 15; see pages 6-7 for details. Reservations may be made up to 8 
weeks in advance. All sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis the rest of the year. 
Oceanside campground has both drive-in sites for RV and tent camping as well as walk-in tent 
sites for tents only. The limit of stay for both campgrounds is as noted below from May 1 through 
September 30 with a limit of 30 days for the calendar year. Campgrounds usually fill every day 
from mid-June to Labor Day and weekends through the spring and fall. For camping informa- 
tion call 301-641-3030. 

Group Campground: The campground is open all year. Reservations are required; contact the 
park. Each site will accommodate from 12 to 25 persons. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed at sites shown below on a first-come, 
first-served basis. Oceanside sites are open all year. Bayside sites are open from February through 
October; however, biting insects discourage most campers from using Bayside sites in the sum- 
mer. A backcountry permit is required for all sites. The limit of stay is as noted below from 
May 1 through September 30; with a limit of 30 days total for the calendar year. 
Special Notes: None of the developed campsites are shaded. Tent campers should bring 18-inch- 
long stakes for camping in sandy soil and occasional strong winds. Mosquitoes, biting flies, and 
ticks can be abundant from mid-May to mid-October; bring insect repellent and bug-proof tent 
netting. Assateague State Park, located adjacent to the national park, has a campground with 
hot showers. The State Park telephone number is 301-641-2120. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Bayside 40 • •" ""• 1~ • • 



Oceanside 86 



54 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



5 


• 


• 


7 


• 


• 




4 


• 




7 






3 


• 




7 







Group Campground 

Oceanside 

Backcountry Campsites 

Bayside (hike-in, boat-in) 
Oceanside (hike-in) 



Catoctin Mountain Park 
6602 Foxville Road, Thurmont, MD 21788 

Setting: Men once logged, farmed, and made moonshine deep in the hills of this portion of the 
Appalachian Mountains where campers today come for a quiet woodland visit. Evidence of 
man's past activities can be seen in the second-growth forests of chestnut oak, hickory, birch, 
poplar, and sassafras. Creeks flow through the hills. Whitetailed deer are natives. 
Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open from mid- April to the third Sunday of Novem- 
ber on a first-come, first-served basis. The limit of stay noted below is for any one stay; the 
total permitted stay in one year is 14 days. Trailers up to 22 feet long and tents up to 9 by 12 
feet are permitted. Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are provided. 

Group Campgrounds: Misty Mount camp has several rustic wood-and-stone cabins and lodges. 
Each cabin accommodates up to 4 persons; lodges, 8. Anyone 18 years or older can rent a 
cabin or lodge, both of which are available from May through October. Each cabin and lodge 
has single beds and mattresses; central hot showers and restrooms are available. Some cabins 
and all restrooms are wheelchair-accessible. Reservations are required; contact the volunteer 
organization that runs the camp at Misty Mount Camp, C.A.M.P.E.R., Inc., 6602 Foxville Road, 
Thurmont, MD 21788. Greentop, also a cabin camp, has several rustic cabins and 1 lodge 
equipped like those at Misty Mount, but it is for organized groups only. Round Meadow includes 
4 modern dormitories and is equipped similarly to the cabin camps. It, too, is for organized 
groups only. Both Greentop and Round Meadow are available in the spring and fall. Reserva- 
tions are required; contact the park during January for the spring camping season and in May 
for the fall season. Groups at Greentop and Round Meadow must include at least 60 persons. 
Poplar Grove Youth Group Tenting Area is available mid-April through February for organ- 
ized youth groups not exceeding high school age. Sites accommodate up to 25 persons. Reser- 
vations are required; contact the park visitor center. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Owens 
Creek— evening campfire programs. Alcoholic beverages are prohibited in the park. Fires are 
permitted only in grills provided or designated fire rings. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 



Owens Creek 



Group Campgrounds 



Greentop 



Poplar Grove Youth Tenting 



Misty Mount 



Round Meadow 



51 • 


• 


• 


7 


• 


• 






1 




• 




• 


• 


• 


3 


• 


• 


7 


• 






25 




• 


14 


• 


• 




1 




• 




• 


• 


• 



Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park 
P.O. Box 4, Sharpsburg, MD 21782 

Setting: Campers get a taste of history and nature along the 184-mile Chesapeake and Ohio 
(C&O) Canal. The 19th-century transportation canal parallels the wooded shores of the Poto- 
mac River from urban Georgetown in Washington, D.C. (milepost 0), to the mountains of Cum- 
berland, Maryland (milepost 184). A gravel-surfaced towpath follows the entire canal route. 

55 



Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open from Memorial Day to Labor Day on a first- 
come, first-served basis. RVs up to 16 feet long are permitted at McCoys Ferry, 15-Mile Creek, 
and Spring Gap. 

Group Campground: The Marsden Tract is open all year. Water is available only from April 
through November. An advance permit is required; call the park's Great Falls Tavern Visitor 
Center in Great Falls, Maryland. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year at the sites shown below on a 
first-come, first-served basis. Water is available at all sites only from April through mid-November. 
Special Notes: Milepost numbers along the canal and towpath are listed after each campground 
name below. Horses are not allowed in camping areas. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Antietam Creek 69.3 



McCoys Ferry 1 10.4 

15-Mile C reek 140.9 

Spring Gap 173.3 

Group Campgrou nd 

Marsden Tract 11.5 

Backcountry Campsites^ 

Horsepen Branch 26.1 
(hike-in, bike-in) 

Chisel Branch 30.5 (hike-in, 
bike-in) 

Turtle Run 34.4 (hike-in, 
bike-in) 

Marble Quarry 38.2 (hike-in, 
bike-in) 

Indian Flats 42.5 (hike-in, 
bike-in) 

Calico Rocks 47.6 (hike-in, 
bike-in) 

Bald Eagle Island 49.9 
(hike-in, bike-in) 

Huckleberry Hill 62.5 
(hike-in, bike-in) 



Killiansburg Cave 75.2 
(hike-in, bike-in) 

Horseshoe Branch 79.6 
(hike-in, bike-in) 

Big Woods 82.4 (hike-in, 
bike-in) 

Opequon Junction 90.9 
(hike-in, bike-in) 



Cumberland Valley 95.2 
(hike-in, bike-in) 

Jordon Junction 101.2 
(hike-in, bike-in) 

North Mountain 109.5 
(hike-in, bike-in) 

Licking Creek 116.0 (hike-in, 
bike-in) 



20 • 10 • • 


14 • • 14 


10 • • 14 • • 


19 • • 14 • 




4 • 7 • 




ltd • 1 • 


ltd • 1 • 


ltd • 1 • • 


ltd • 1 • 


ltd • 1 • 


ltd • 1 • • 


ltd • 1 • 


ltd • 1 • 


ltd • 1 • • 


ltd • 1 • 


ltd • 1 • 


ltd • 1 • 


ltd • 1 • 


ltd • 1 • • 


ltd • 1 • 


ltd • 1 • 



56 





Total RVs Tents Fee 
sites 


Limit Drinking 
of stay water 


Rush Sanitary Camp 
toilets dump store 


Little Pool 120.6 (hike-in, 
bike-in) 


ltd • 






Leopards Mill 129.9 (hike-in, 
bike-in) 


ltd • 






Cacapon Junction 133.6 
(hike-in, bike-in) 


ltd • 






Indigo Neck 139.2 (hike-in, 
bike-in) 


ltd • 






Devils Alley 144.5 (hike-in, 
bike-in) 


ltd • 






Stickpile Hill 149.4 (hike-in, 
bike-in) 


ltd • 






Sorrel Ridge 154.1 (hike-in, 
bike-in) 


ltd • 






Paw Paw Tunnel 156.0 
(boat-in only) 


ltd • 




• 


Purslane Run 157.4 (hike-in, 
bike-in) 


ltd • 






Town Creek 162.1 (hike-in, 
bike-in) 


ltd • 






Potomac Forks 164.8 
(hike-in, bike-in) 


ltd • 






Pigmans Ferry 169.1 (hike-in, 
bike-in) 


ltd • 






Iron Mountain 175.3 
(hike-in, bike-in) 


ltd • 




• 


Evitts Creek 179.0 (hike-in, 


ltd • 







bike-in) 



Greenbelt Park 

6565 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20770 

Setting: This 1,100-acre woodland retreat in the greater Washington, D.C., metropolitan area 
allows urban dwellers to go camping and get away from it all without going very far. Situated 
on the rolling hills of the Piedmont coastal plain, the park's hardwood forests are a natural 
sanctuary for raccoons, squirrels, red fox, bobwhite quail, and many other birds. Downtown 
Washington is 12 miles away. 

Tent/RV Campground: The family campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served 
basis. The limit of stay is as noted below from Memorial Day to Labor Day; the rest of the year 
it is 14 days. One family is allowed per site. RVs up to 30 feet long are permitted. Wheelchair- 
accessible sites are available close to restrooms; assistance may be needed to enter the restrooms. 
Special Notes: A wide variety of commercial services is available within 2 miles of the park. 
Fires are permitted only in grills provided or campstoves. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campground 

Greenbelt 



174 



57 



Michigan 

Isle Royale National Park 
87 North Ripley Street, Houghton, MI 49931 

Setting: An unbroken wilderness awaits campers on Isle Royale, a 45-mile-long island of spruce- 
fir and birch-maple forests, inland lakes, and rocky shores 22 miles off Minnesota's mainland in 
Lake Superior. Dozens of smaller islands surround the main island. Moose and wolves share 
the island with red fox and beaver. Park access is by boat or floatplane only. 
Group Campgrounds: See "Backcountry Campsites" below for information on backcountry 
group sites. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed from mid-April through October on 
a first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. All backcountry camping 
areas have sites for camping parties of 6 persons or less. Eighty-eight 3-sided wooden shelters 
are located at 20 Lake Superior campsites. Seventeen of the camping areas also have sites for 
groups (7 to a maximum of 10 persons including group leaders). These 17 areas are: Chickenbone 
East, Chickenbone West, Chippewa Harbor, Daisy Farm, Desor South, Feldtmann Lake, Hatchet 
Lake, Island Mine, Lake Richie, Malone Bay, McCargoe Cove, Moskey Basin, Rock Harbor, 
Siskiwit Bay, Three Mile, Todd Harbor, and Washington Creek. Groups should write the park 
for special group camping information. Some sites listed below as hike-in sites are accessible 
by a combination of canoeing and portaging. Docks are available at all boat-in sites. 
Special Notes: Commercial passenger boats and a floatplane ferry visitors to the park through- 
out the camping season. Boats leave from Grand Portage, Minnesota, and Houghton and Cop- 
per Harbor, Michigan. A floatplane leaves from Houghton, Michigan. Reservations, which must 
be made with the individual transportation services, are recommended. Contact the park for 
up-to-date transportation information. Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping 
areas include: Rock Harbor— hot showers, coin-operated laundry, restaurant, snack bar, 
marina, canoe rentals, evening ranger programs; Washington Creek — hot showers, coin- 
operated laundry, boat fuel, canoe rentals, evening ranger programs; Daisy Farm — evening 
ranger programs. Fires are permitted only in grills provided or campstoves; all campers should 
bring stoves. Wood gathering is prohibited in many areas. Campers must pack out all trash. 
Pets are not allowed within park boundaries. Mosquitoes, black flies, and gnats can be bother- 
some in the summer; bring insect repellent and bug-proof tent netting. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Backcountry Campsites 

Beaver Island (boat-in) 

Belle Isle (boat-in) 

Birch Island (boat-in) 

Caribou Island (boat-in) 

Chickenbone East 
(hike-in) 

Chickenbone West 
(hike-in) 

Chippewa Harbor (hike-in, 
boat-in) 

Daisy Farm (hike-in, boat-in) 

Desor North (hike-in) 



Desor South (hike-in) 
Duncan Bay (boat-in) 



Duncan Narrows (boat-in) 
Feldtmann Lake (hike-in) 
Grace Island (boat-in) 
Hatchet Lake (hike-in) 



3 • 3 


6 • 5 


2 • 3 


4 • 3 


4 • 2 


9 • 2 


7 • 3 


26 • 3 


3 • 2 


10 • 2 


3 • 3 


3 • 3 


8 • 2 


2 • 3 


8 • 2 



58 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Hay Bay (boat-in) 



Huginnin Cove (hike-in, 
boat-in) 

Intermediate Lake (canoe-in 
only) 

Island Mine (hike-in) 

Lake Richie (hike-in, 
canoe-in only) 

Lake Richie Canoe (canoe-in 
only) 

Lake Whittlesey (canoe-in 
only) 

Lane Cove (hike-in) 

Little Todd Harbor (hike-in) 

Malone Bay (hike-in, boat-in) 

McCargoe Cove (hike-in, 
boat-in) 

Merritt Lane (boat-in) 

Moskey Basin (hike-in, 
boat-in) 

Pickerel Cove (canoe-in only) 

Rock Harbor (hike-in, 
boat-in) 

Siskiwit Bay (hike-in, boat-in) 

Three Mile (hike-in, boat-in) 

Todd Harbor (hike-in, 
boat-in) 

Tookers Island (boat-in) 

Washington Creek (hike-in, 
boat-in) 

Wood Lake (canoe-in only) 



1 • 3 


5 • 3 


3 • 2 


6 • 3 


6 • 2 


2 • 2 


3 • 2 


5 • 3 


4 • 2 


8 • 3 


12 • 3 


2 • 3 


10 • 3 


1 • 2 


23 • 1 • • 


9 • 3 


15 • 1 


10 • 3 


2 • 3 


19 • 3 • • 


3 • 2 



Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore 
P.O. Box 40, Munising, MI 49862 

Setting: Campers in this near wilderness setting overlook Lake Superior from the 50- to 200- 
foot-high sandstone cliffs known as the Pictured Rocks. Wave erosion has created arches, ped- 
estals, and other rock sculptures along shore. There are sand and pebble beaches, waterfalls, 
lakes, dunes, and forests of hardwoods, spruce, hemlock, and fir. Black bear, beaver, and 
porcupine or raccoon are common. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Vehicle campgrounds are open spring, summer, and fall on a first-come, 
first-served basis. Water is available only from early May to mid-November. Handicapped- 
accessible sites are provided at each campground; these sites are held until 6 p.m. each day on 
a first-come, first-served basis for use by any disabled person. Wheelchair-accessible toilets 
are also provided at the campgrounds. 

Group Campgrounds: See "Backcountry Campsites" below for information on backcountry 
group sites. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year at campsites shown below. A 
backcountry permit is required. Reservations can be made for some sites, while others are avail- 
able on a first-come, first-served basis. Reservations can be requested by writing the park. Camp- 



59 



sites for parties of 8 persons or less are available at backcountry sites. One backcountry group 
site, for groups of up to 20 persons, is available at each of the following areas: Au Sable Point 
East, Beaver Lake, Cliffs, Coves, Masse Homestead, Mosquito River, Sevenmile Creek, and 
Trapper's Lake. In the winter when snow covers the ground more of the park is open for back- 
country camping. 

Special Notes: Heavy snows close park roads from about November to May each year. Camp- 
ers may still enter the park on designated snowmobile routes, or by crosscountry skiing or 
snowshoeing. Interpretive programs are conducted in summer. Diesel fuel is available in com- 
munities near the park. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Hurricane River 
Little Beaver Lake 



Twelvemile Beach 



Backcountry Campsites 



Au Sable Point East (hike-in) 
Beaver Creek (hike-in) 



Beaver Lake (hike-in) 
Benchmark (hike-in) 
Chapel Beach (hike-in) 
Cliff s ( hike-inT " 

Coves (hike-in) 
Masse Homestead (hike-in) 
Mosquito River (hike-in) 
Pine Bluff (hike-in) 
Potato Patch (hike-in) 
Sevenmile Creek (hike-in) 
Trapper's Lake (hike-in) 



22 • • • 14 • 


8 • • • 14 • 


37 • • • 14 • 




9 • 3 


6 • 3 


11 • 3 


6 • 3 


15 • 3 


4 • 3 


6 • 3 


4 • 3 


11 • 3 


5 • 3 


3 • 3 


6 • 3 


6 • 3 



Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore 
P.O. Box 277, 9922 Front Street, Empire, MI 49630 

Setting: Many camping areas lie in this hilly region of massive coastal sand dunes, clear inland 
lakes, beech-maple forests, sandy beaches, and birch-shaded streams along Lake Michigan. The 
largest dune, Sleeping Bear Dune, is a highlight of any visit. Backcountry campers can find 
privacy on North and South Manitou Islands off the Michigan mainland. Island access is by 
boat only. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. Water 
is available only from mid-April to November. Each campground has 1 handicapped-accessible 
site next to an accessible toilet. Platte River is undergoing reconstruction and will not be open 
in 1991. Only limited facilities will be available in 1992. A number of private campgrounds 
outside the park will be available. 

Group Campground: The campground is open all year. Reservations are required; contact the 
park. The entire campground accommodates up to 100 persons. See "Backcountry Campsites" 
below for information on backcountry group sites. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year at sites shown below. A back- 
country permit is required. Backcountry group sites, which accommodate up to 25 persons, 
are available. Reservations are required for these sites; contact the park. The rest of the sites 
are for smaller camping parties; these are available on a first-come, first-served basis. 
Special Notes: A commercial passenger boat ferries visitors from Leland, Michigan, to South 
Manitou Island, where Bay, Bay Group, Weather Station, and Weather Station Group back- 
country campsites are located, and to North Manitou Island from May to November. The 



60 



boat runs daily in the summer, less frequently during the rest of its operating season. Reserva- 
tions are recommended; they must be made directly with the boat operator. Contact the park 
for information. Services available all year or seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
D.H. Day and Platte River— gasoline station, boat rentals, firewood, evening ranger programs. 
Fires are permitted only in grills provided, designated fire rings, or campstoves. Campers can 
collect dead and down firewood anywhere but on the dunes. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

D.H. Day 

Platte River (Closed in 1991) 

Group Campground 

D.H. Day 

Backcountry Campsites 

Bay (boat-and-hike-in) 

Bay Group (boat-and- 
hike-in) 

North Manitou (boat-and- 
hike-in) 

Valley View (hike-in) 

Weather Station (boat-and- 
hike-in) 

Weather Station Group 
(boat-and-hike-in) 

White Pine (hike-in) 



89 • « 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 






4 « 


• 


14 










27 1 




14 


• 






3 « 




14 


• 






open 1 




14 








6 « 




14 








27 « 




14 


• 






3 1 




14 


• 






6 « 




14 









61 



Minnesota 

Grand Portage National Monument 
P.O. Box 666, Grand Marais, MN 55604 

Setting: Just as 18th- and 19th-century fur traders on their way to and from the fur-rich lands of 
Canada once rested along the Grand Portage, so do campers today. The SV^-mile long Grand 
Portage was a vital overland link in the historic trading route along rivers and other waterways 
into the continent's interior. The camping area is in a birch-fir forest on the Pigeon River. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year at sites shown below on a 
first-come, first-served basis. A free backcountry permit is required. Each site accommodates 
up to 10 campers. Parking is available at the stockade, 8.5 miles from the campsite, or at Old 
U.S. 61 , 4.8 miles from the campsite. 

Special Notes: Fires are permitted only in grills provided or in campstoves. Mosquitoes and 
other insects can be bothersome in the summer; bring insect repellent and bug-proof tent net- 
ting. Winter temperatures often fall to — 10°F and colder. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Backcountry Campsites 



Fort Charlotte (hike-in, 
canoe-in) 



Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway (see Wisconsin) 

Voyageurs National Park 
P.O. Box 50, International Falls, MN 56649 

Setting: Like the French-Canadian voyageurs who canoed through this lakes region in the hey- 
day of the fur trade in the 1700s and 1800s, campers can spend the night on lakeshores or 
forested islands. The region's lakes, bogs, freshwater marshes, and mixed forests of hardwoods 
and evergreens are wilderness sanctuaries for moose, wolves, beaver, black bear, and loons. 
Group Campgrounds: See "Backcountry Campsites" below for information on backcountry 
group sites. 

Backcountry Campsites: Boat-accessible backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout 
much of the park on a first-come, first-served basis. Many sites are inaccessible during the 
freeze-up of the lakes from mid-November to mid-December and again during spring thaw in 
April; when the lakes are frozen, access is by snowmobile, crosscountry skiing, or snowshoeing. 
Two campsites designed for larger groups each accommodate up to 5 tents. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (boat-in, 125 • 14 

boat-and-hike-in) 



63 



Mississippi 

Gulf Islands National Seashore See also Florida 

3500 Park Road, Ocean Springs, MS 39564 

Setting: Davis Bayou, a saltwater inlet that opens up into the Gulf of Mexico, borders the main 
camping area. Saltwater marshes, homes for shorebirds, alligators, shrimp, and fish, are nearby. 
Magnolias and a variety of pines and oaks shelter the camping area. For more primitive sur- 
roundings, campers can retreat to barrier islands about 10 miles off Mississippi's mainland. 
Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. The 
limit of stay is as noted below from January through March; the rest of the year it is 30 days. 
Water and electrical hookups are provided at each site. Several campsites near wheelchair- 
accessible restrooms are held until noon each day for disabled persons. 

Group Campground: The campground is open all year. Reservations are recommended; 
contact the park. The campground is for organized groups only; up to 30 persons can be 
accommodated. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year on East Ship, Horn, and Petit 
Bois Islands. No drinking water is available on the islands. You must bring water with you. 
Special Notes: Commercial passenger boats ferry persons to backcountry camping areas on 
the islands from the mainland. The boats run all year; contact the park for information. Private 
boaters may pull boats up on island beaches or anchor offshore; no docks are provided. Ser- 
vices available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: Davis Bayou — 
hot showers, restaurants, gasoline station, evening ranger programs. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 



Davis Bayou 51 • • • 14 

Group Campground 



Davis Bayou 1 # # 14 

Backcountry Campsites 



Various locations (boat-in, open 

boat-and-hike-in) 



Natchez Trace Parkway Camping in Mississippi and 

R.R. 1, NT-143, Tupelo, MS 38801 Tennessee 

Setting: A historic frontier route used by Indians, Civil War troops, and other travelers for 

more than 400 years, the Natchez Trace Parkway today offers camping along its current 405 

miles of paved parkway. The parkway runs from Natchez, Mississippi (milepost 0), through 

Alabama, to Nashville, Tennessee (milepost 449). Camping areas are on rolling hills in mixed 

pine-hardwood forests. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. All 

campgrounds have some wheelchair-accessible sites and restrooms. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 

Jeff Busby— gasoline station. In the summer, high temperatures range from 90 to 95°F and the 

relative humidity commonly is 90 percent and above. Milepost numbers along the parkway are 

listed after each campground name below. Diesel fuel is available in nearby communities. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 



Rocky Springs 54.8 22 • • 14 



Jeff Busby 193.1 18 • • 14 



Meriwether Lewis 385.9 32 • • 14 



64 



Missouri 

Ozark National Scenic Riverways 
P.O. Box 490, Van Buren, MO 63965 

Setting: The Current and Jacks Fork Rivers meander through hills and hollows of the Ozark 
Mountains, where the land is almost as wild for campers today as it was in the days when early 
Indians hunted and fished here. Both rivers have quiet pools and mild rapids. Large freshwater 
springs and limestone caves are abundant along the rivers. Oaks and hickories shade riverside 
camping areas. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 
Wheelchair-accessible sites near accessible restrooms are available at Alley and Big Spring. 
Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are provided at Round Spring. 

Group Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year. Reservations are required from early 
April to early October; see pages 6-7 for details. Sites accommodate from 15 to 45 persons. Wheel- 
chair-accessible sites near accessible restrooms are available at Alley. 

Special Notes: Campgrounds are occasionally closed due to flooding. Services available sea- 
sonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: Akers and Pulltite — evening ranger 
programs; Alley— hot showers, evening ranger programs; Big Spring— cold showers, restau- 
rant, evening ranger programs; Round Spring— hot showers, coin-operated laundry, evening 
ranger programs. Canoe rentals are available all along the rivers. Fires are permitted only in 
grills provided or campstoves. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Akers 
Alley Spring 



Big Spring 



Owls Bend 



Pulltite 



Round Spring 



Two Rivers 



Group Campgrounds 



Akers 



Alley Spring 



Big Spring 



Pulltite 



Round Spring 



Two Rivers 



81 • • • 14 • • 


187 • • • 14 • • • • 


205 • • • 14 • • • 


10 • • • 14 • 


56 • • • 14 • • • 


60 • • • 14 • •• • 


14 • • • 14 • • • 




5 • • 14 • • 


3 • • 14 • •• • 


4 • • 14 • • • 


3 • • 14 • • 


3 • • 14 • •• • 


2 • • 14 • • • 



65 



Montana 

Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area Camping in Montana and 

P.O. Box 458, Fort Smith, MT 59035 Wyoming 

Setting: Bighorn Lake, a 71-mile-long reservoir created by the damming of the Bighorn River, 
is a favorite of fishermen, boaters, and campers. Canyon walls up to 2,000 feet high flank the 
lake on both sides. From south to north, the ever-changing lakeshore scenery blends from semi- 
desert into a scrub juniper woodland into forested mountains and finally into a short-grass prairie. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis; heavy 
snows sometimes close campgrounds for periods from November through March. Water is avail- 
able at Afterbay and Horseshoe Bend only from April to October. Flush toilets are available all 
year at Afterbay, but at Horseshoe Bend they are provided only from April through Septem- 
ber; the rest of the year pit toilets are available. Afterbay and Horseshoe Bend have handicapped- 
accessible restrooms. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park 
on a first-come, first-served basis. Two areas— Black Canyon and Medicine Creek — are open 
only from about March to December; exact dates depend on when Bighorn Lake freezes and 
thaws. Black Canyon has flush toilets from May to October; pit toilets are provided the rest of 
the year. A backcountry permit is required. 

Special Notes: Campgrounds may be closed for periods during the high fire danger season from 
mid-June to mid- August. Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Afterbay— evening ranger programs; Horseshoe Bend— marina, snack bar, evening ranger pro- 
grams. In Black Canyon, fires are permitted only in grills provided and campstoves; in other 
areas, the park staff recommends building fires in grills, designated fire pits, or campstoves. 
Temperatures range from 100°F, and hotter, in the summer to — 10°F, and colder, in the winter. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Afterbay 



Horseshoe Bend 



Barry's Landing 



30 • 


• 




14 


• 


• 


• 


• 


126 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


• 


14 • 


• 




14 












12 


• 




14 




• 






20 


• 




14 










ltd 


• 




14 











Backcountry Campsites 

Black Canyon (boat-in) 

Medicine Creek (boat-in) 

Other locations (hike-in, 
boat-in) 



Glacier National Park 
West Glacier, MT 59936 

Setting: This glacially carved landscape in the northern Rocky Mountains attracts campers 
with its promise of high mountain adventure, 50 small glaciers, 200 sparkling lakes, rivers and 
streams, waterfalls, forests, and alpine wildflowers. Mountain goats, bighorn sheep, grizzlies, 
and black bears dwell here. The park is part of Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park, 
the world's first, which includes adjacent Waterton Lakes National Park in Canada. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Portions of Apgar and St. Mary Lake are open all year. Water and flush 
toilets are available from about mid-May to mid-September; the rest of the year no water is 
available and pit toilets are provided. Apgar, Bowman Lake, Cut Bank, Kintla Lake, and Two 
Medicine are open from mid-May or early June to mid-November. Water and flush toilets, 
where provided, are available from the opening of the campground until mid-September; the 
rest of the season water is not available and pit toilets are provided. The rest of the campgrounds 
open in June or July and close in late August or September. All campground sites are available 
on a first-come, first-served basis. The limit of stay for all campgrounds is as noted below in 



66 






July and August; the rest of the year it is 14 days. Up to 8 persons are allowed in a campsite. 
Towed camping vehicles are prohibited from using Sprague Creek because of limited turnaround 
room. RV length limit varies between 18 and 25 feet for other campgrounds. Apgar, Avalanche, 
Fish Creek, Many Glacier, Rising Sun, Sprague Creek, and St. Mary Lake have wheelchair- 
accessible restrooms. Campgrounds often fill in July and August and into September; campers 
should arrive by early afternoon to get a site. 

Group Campground: Group sites are open from about May to early October; the rest of the 
year camping is permitted at adjacent picnic areas, where no water is available and pit toilets 
are provided. Camping is on a first-come, first-served basis. In the campground at Apgar, each 
site accommodates from 9 to 15 persons. The limit of stay is as noted below in July and August; 
the rest of the year it is 14 days. The campsites have wheelchair-accessible restrooms. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park 
on a first-come, first-served basis. A free backcountry permit is required and must be obtained 
in person at visitor centers, ranger stations, or park headquarters no more than 1 day in ad- 
vance. A camping party may extend its length of stay beyond 6 days by contacting a ranger at 
the end of 6 days. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Apgar and 
St. Mary Lake— restaurant, gasoline station, evening ranger programs; Avalanche, Many Gla- 
cier, Fish Creek, Rising Sun, Sprague Creek, and Two Medicine— evening ranger programs. 
Fires are permitted only in grills that are provided or in personal campstoves. Campers should 
keep a clean camp and store food in vehicles or, in the backcountry, on poles provided, to 
avoid attracting black and grizzly bears. Backcountry campers should be aware of the dangers 
of avalanches in winter and spring. Logging Creek and Quartz may be closed in 1991. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Apgar 

Avalanche 
Bowman Lake 
Cut Bank 
Fish Creek 
Kintla Lake 
Logging Creek 



Many Glacier 



Quartz Creek 



Rising Sun 



Sprague Creek 



St. Mary Lake 



Two Medicine 



Group Campground 



Apgar 



Many Glacier 



St. Mary Lake 



Two Medicine 



Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in) 



196 • • • 7 • •• • 


■"••• 7 • •• 


48 • • • 7 • 


19 • • • 7 • 


ISO • • • 7 • •• • 


13 • • • 7 • 


8 • • • 7 • 


117 • • • 7 • •• • 


7 • • • 7 • 


83 • • • 7 • •• • 


25 •••7 • •• 


156 • • • 7 • • • 


99 • • • 7 • •• • 




9 • • • 7 • •• • 


1 • • 7 • • • 


1 • • 7 • • 


1 • • 7 • • • 




62 • 6 



67 



Nevada 

Great Basin National Park 
Baker, NV 89311 

Setting: Mountainous terrain dominated by towering 13,063-foot Wheeler Peak, forests of 
ponderosa pine, fir, and quaking aspen, and cool mountain streams offer an inviting campers' 
retreat from the surrounding Nevada desert. Lehman Caves, a large limestone cavern decorated 
with stalactites and stalagmites, 3,000-year-old bristlecone pines, and glacial lakes are other 
treasures of this wilderness area. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Lower Lehman Creek is open all year, except during and immediately 
after snowstorms. Baker Creek and Upper Lehman Creek are open from about May 15 through 
October. Wheeler Peak is open from about June 15 to October 1; exact dates depend on snow 
conditions. All campgrounds are on a first-come, first-served basis. Water is available at Upper 
and Lower Lehman Creek campgrounds only from about May through September. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is permitted all year at designated sites shown 
below and throughout much of the rest of the park. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Upper 
Lehman Creek and Wheeler Peak — evening campf ire programs. Guided tours of Lehman Caves 
are offered all year, except on winter holidays. No fuel or camping supplies are available in the 
park; the nearest are about 5 miles away in Baker, Nevada. Cold rain or snow can occur sud- 
denly at any time of year. Pace yourself in higher elevations to avoid altitude sickness. Cattle 
grazing is permitted in the park by federal legislation. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Rush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Baker Creek 

Lower Lehman Creek 

Upper Lehman Creek 

Wheeler Peak 

Backcountry Campsites 

Snake Creek (high- 
clearance 2WD-in) 



Strawberry Creek (high- 
clearance 2WD-in) 

Other locations (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 



32 • 


• 




14 




11 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


24 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


37 • 


• 




14 






ltd 


• 




14 




ltd 


• 




14 




ltd 


• 




7 





Lake Mead National Recreation Area Camping in Nevada and 

601 Nevada Highway, Boulder City, NV 89005-2426 Arizona 

Setting: In earlier times few travelers would have chosen to stay overnight in this harsh desert 
of canyons and mountains, but since the construction of Hoover and Davis Dams and the crea- 
tion of Lake Mead and Lake Mohave, this area has become a mecca for those seeking oppor- 
tunities for lakeshore camping and water sports. Backcountry desert camping is offered, too. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. In 
all campgrounds except trailer villages each site is limited to 9 persons and 1 vehicle (plus any- 
thing being towed). The limit of stay noted below for Cottonwood Cove applies to part of the 
campground all year; in the rest of the campground the limit is 30 days from March 1 to May 
31 and 90 days the rest of the year. Trailer villages, which are run by park concessioners, have 
water, electrical, and sewage hookups for RVs. Persons staying at trailer villages can request 
an extension to their limit of stay after 30 days; extensions of up to 6 months may be granted. 
Wheelchair-accessible sites and restrooms are available at all campgrounds. 
Group Campground: The campground is open all year. Reservations are required; call the park. 
Groups must include at least 10 persons. 



68 



Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed along both lakeshores and through- 
out much of the desert. The park recommends camping from October to May, when cooler 
temperatures prevail. 

Special Notes: All camping areas except Hemenway are within 1 mile of a restaurant, marina, 
and boat rentals. Other services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas 
include: Boulder Beach and Lakeshore Trailer Village (at Boulder Beach) — hot showers, coin- 
operated laundry, evening ranger programs; Callville Bay Trailer Village— hot showers and 
coin-operated laundry; Cottonwood Cove and Cottonwood Cove Trailer Village— hot showers, 
coin-operated laundry, gasoline station; Echo Bay, Echo Bay Trailer Village, Temple Bar, and 
Temple Bar Trailer Village— hot showers, coin-operated laundry, gasoline station; Overton 
Beach Trailer Village— hot showers and coin-operated laundry; Katherine and Lake Mohave 
Resort Trailer Village (at Katherine) — hot showers, coin-operated laundry, gasoline station, 
and evening ranger programs; Willow Beach Trailer Village— hot showers, coin-operated 
laundry, and gasoline station. Fires are permitted only in grills provided or campstoves. 
Summer temperatures reach 100°F and above; pets should not be left in vehicles or trailers. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Boulder Beach 

Callville Bay 

Callville Bay Trailer Village 

Cottonwood Cove 

Cottonwood Cove Trailer 
Village 

Echo Bay 

Echo Bay Trailer Village 

Hemenway 

Katherine 

Lake Mohave Resort Trailer 
Village 

Lakeshore Trailer Village 

Las Vegas Wash 

Overton Beach Trailer 
Village 

Temple Bar 

Temple Bar Trailer Village 

Willow Beach Trailer Village 

Group Campground 

Boulder Beach (walk-in) 

Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (boat-in, 
4WD-in) 



154 • • • 30 • • • • 


80 • • • 40 • •• • 


6 • • 30 • • • 


149 • • • 30 • • • • 


75 • • 30 • • • 


166 • • • 90 • • • • 


58 • • 30 • • • 


184 • • • 30 • • • 


173 • • • 30 • • • • 


39 • • 30 • • • 


75 • • 30 • • • • 


89 • • • 30 • •• • 


15 • • 30 • • • • 


153 • • • 90 • • • • 


13 • • 30 • • • • 


18 • • 30 • • • • 




5 • • 30 • •• • 




open • 



69 




Bandelier: A cold day could be the perfect, excuse for a carrrpfire. 



#. 



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) 



New Jersey 

Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (see Pennsylvania) 



New Mexico 

Bandelier National Monument 
HCR1, Box 1, Suite 15, Los Alamos, NM 87544-9701 

Setting: The mesas, canyons, and plateaus where campers stay today were the home of ancient 
Anasazi Indians from the 12th to 16th centuries. The preserved ruins of their agricultural 
villages include cliff dwellings, open pueblos, and shrines. Most campers stay on the mesa 
tops, but backcountry campers find overnight sites on mesa tops and canyon bottoms. 
Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open from early March through November on a 
first-come, first-served basis. Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are available. 
Group Campground: The campground is open from mid-April through October. Reservations 
are required; call the park. A maximum of 50 campers is permitted per site. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park 
on a first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. Camping parties are lim- 
ited to 10 persons. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Juniper- 
evening ranger programs. Food, fuel (including diesel), and other supplies are not available in 
the park; the nearest are 12 miles away in Los Alamos and White Rock, New Mexico. Campers 
are encouraged to bring their own wood or charcoal for campfires, or use campstoves. Wood 
fires in the backcountry are discouraged. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 



Juniper 



Group Campground 



Ponderosa 



96 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 




4 


• 


• 


7 


• 








8 


• 




2 








ltd 


• 













Backcountry Campsites 

Wilderness Sites (hike-in) 
Other locations (hike-in) 



Chaco Culture National Historical Park 
Star Route 4, Box 6500, Bloomfield, NM 87413 

Setting: The desert canyon country where the camping areas are located was the site of a 
flourishing Anasazi Indian city of pueblos in the 10th century A.D. Prehistoric ruins in Chaco 
Canyon, the center of the far-flung community, are nearby. Pueblo Bonito, the largest of Chaco's 
pueblos, had 600 to 800 rooms and outdoor plazas. Ancient roads connected the pueblos. 
Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 
Drinking water is available all year 1 mile away at the visitor center. RVs up to 30 feet long are 
permitted. Wheelchair-accessible campsites and restrooms are available. 
Group Campground: The campground is open all year. Reservations are required; contact the 
park. Groups must include from 15 to 50 persons. Drinking water is available all year 1 mile 
away at the visitor center. RVs up to 30 feet long are permitted. 

Special Notes: During rainy weather the dirt access road to the park can be difficult to travel; 
call the park for up-to-date road conditions. Services available seasonally or all year within 1 
mile of camping areas include: Gallo— visitor center with exhibits of the art, artifacts, and 
architecture of the Anasazi, evening campfire programs. No food, fuel (including diesel), tele- 
phone, or other services are available in the park; the nearest are 30 miles away on N. Mex. 44. 
Fires are permitted only in grills provided or campstoves; wood gathering is prohibited and no 
firewood is available in or near the park. Campgrounds fill up by early afternoon. 

71 



El Morro: An out-of-the-way place to stay. 




Chaco Culture continued 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campground 

Gallo 

Group Campground 

Gallo 



46 



14 



14 



El Morro National Monument 
Route 2, Box 43, Ramah, NM 87321 

Setting: Two hundred-foot-high El Morro, a great sandstone buttress and landmark marking 
the site where weary western travelers once rested, dominates the view from the camping area. 
Indians and Spanish conquistadors stopped to enjoy water from the natural pool at El Morro's 
base and carve messages into the rock. Hundreds of inscriptions record their passing. 
Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. It 
may be closed by snow for periods from January through March. Water is provided only from 
about April through October; the rest of the year the nearest water is V2 mile away at the visitor 
center. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of the campground include: El Morro— 
evening ranger programs. Food, fuel, and other supplies are not available in the park; the near- 
est are 1 mile away at El Morro Lodge and RV Park or 7 miles away at Lewis Trading Post. 
Diesel fuel is available in Ramah, 12 miles west. Thunderstorms occur frequently from July 
through September. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campground 

El Morro 



14 



72 



New York 



Fire Island: Sea, sand, surf, and serendipity. 




Fire Island National Seashore 
120 Laurel Street, Patchogue, NY 11772 

Setting: Although New York City's skyline is just out of view, campers can feel far removed 
from city life while staying on this 32-mile-long barrier island south of Long Island. The white 
sandy beaches, grassy dunes, thickets, and wetlands are rich in waterfowl and marine life. 
Access to the park's camping area is by private boat or public ferry only. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open from mid-May to mid-October. Reservations are 
required; contact the park for information. Up to 5 persons are permitted at a site. Wheelchair- 
accessible restrooms are available. Sites are assigned by a lottery drawing conducted after April 
15. Applications are accepted January 1 to March 31. Contact the park for further information. 
Group Campground: The campground is open from mid-May to mid-October. Reservations 
are required; persons should send a self-addressed stamped envelope and a request for a group 
camping application to the park after March 1. The application should be completed and 
returned before April 15; the site is assigned by a lottery drawing conducted after April 15. 
The site accommodates up to 40 persons. Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are available. 
Special Notes: From May through October, a commercial boat ferries passengers from 
Patchogue, New York, to a ferry landing less than 'A mile from the camping areas. The ferry 
runs daily; for information contact the park or call the Watch Hill Ferry Company in Patchogue, 
New York. Private boaters can dock at the Watch Hill marina within x k mile of the campgrounds. 
Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Watch Hill — solar-heated 
showers, restaurant, snack bar, evening ranger programs. Fires are permitted only in grills pro- 
vided or campstoves. Sandy campsites require longer-than-normal tent stakes. Mosquitoes are 
abundant in warmer months; bring insect repellent and bug-proof tent netting. Some ticks 
carry Lyme disease, a serious illness: to avoid getting bitten, stay on the boardwalk, use insect 
repellent, and inspect yourself carefully for ticks if you walk through grass or brush. 





Total RVs Tents 
sites 


Fee 


Limit 
of stay 


Drinking 
water 


Flush Sanitary Camp 
toilets dump store 


Tent/RV Campground 












Watch Hill (walk-in) 


25 • 




4 


• 


• • 


Group Campground 












Watch Hill (walk-in) 


1 • 




4 


• 


• • 



73 



North Carolina 

Blue Ridge Parkway Camping in North Carolina 

200 BB&T Building, One Pack Square, Asheville, NC 28801 and Virginia 
Setting: The 469-mile ribbon of highway known as the Blue Ridge Parkway winds along the 
crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina and Virginia and past several camping 
areas. The parkway begins just south of Shenadoah National Park (milepost 0) and continues 
through woodlands of hardwoods, pine, spruce, and fir until it reaches Great Smoky Moun- 
tains National Park (milepost 469). 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open from about May 1 through October or into 
early November, depending on weather conditions. Facilities are limited in winter, and campers 
at this time of year should inquire in advance about which campgrounds are open. Water is 
available at all campgrounds, but flush toilets are provided only from May through October; pit 
toilets are available the rest of the year. All campsites are available on a first-come, first-served 
basis. The limit of stay is as noted below for all campgrounds from June 1 to Labor Day. All 
campgrounds have some sites reserved for RV use only. Mt. Pisgah is run by a park conces- 
sioner. All campgrounds have at least 2 wheelchair-accessible sites near accessible restrooms. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is available all year at campsites shown below 
on a first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. 

Special Notes: The parkway is often closed during periods of ice and snow from November to 
mid-March. Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Otter Creek — restaurant, evening ranger programs; Peaks of Otter, Doughton Park, Crabtree 
Meadows, and Mt. Pisgah— restaurant, gasoline station, evening ranger programs; Julian Price— 
boat rentals, evening ranger programs. Campers at Mt. Pisgah should keep a clean camp and 
store food in their vehicles to avoid attracting black bears. Milepost numbers along the parkway 
are listed after the campground names below. 






Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Otter Creek 60.9 ~ 

Peaks of Otter 86.0 

Roanoke Mountain 120.5 

RockyKnob 167.1 

Doughton Park 241.1 

Julian Price 297.1 

Linville Falls 316.3 

Crabtree Meadows 339.5 

Mt. Pisgah 408.6 ~ 

Backcountry Campsites 

Rock Castle Gorge 168.0 
(hike-in) 

Basin Cove 241.1 (hike-in) 



67 • • • 14 • •• • 


148 • • • 14 • • • • 


105 • • • 14 • • • 


109 • • • 14 • • • 


136 • • • 14 • • • • 


197 • • • 14 • • • 


75 • • • 14 • • • 


43 • • • 14 • •• • 


137 • • • 14 • • • • 




8 • 14 


10 • 14 



Cape Hatteras National Seashore 
Route 1, Box 675, Manteo, NC 27954 

Setting: The influence of the sea is evident throughout camping areas on the Outer Banks, 
a narrow 70-mile chain of barrier islands off the North Carolina mainland. Coastal fishing vil- 
lages, historic lighthouses, the remains of shipwrecks, sea birds, crabs and clams, and sportfish 
abound. Access to most of the park is by road; one island, Ocracoke, can be reached only by 
ferry or airplane. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Cape Point, Ocracoke, and Oregon Inlet are open from mid-April into 
late October. Frisco and Salvo are open from about Memorial Day to Labor Day. Reservations, 



74 



see pages 6-7 for details, can be made from mid-May to Labor Day for Ocracoke; during the 
rest of the camping season the campground is on a first-come, first-served basis. The other 
campgrounds are on a first-come, first-served basis. All campgrounds have wheelchair-accessible 
restrooms. 

Special Notes: State-operated ferries carry passengers and vehicles to Ocracoke Island from 
Hatteras Island, Swanquarter, and Cedar Island, North Carolina, all year; for information or 
reservations, call the state Department of Transportation's Cedar Island Ferry Reservations 
number in Atlantic, North Carolina, or the department's Ferry Reservations number in Swan- 
quarter. Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: Cape 
Point, Frisco, Ocracoke, and Salvo— cold showers; Oregon Inlet— cold showers, marina. Mos- 
quitoes are abundant in the summer; bring insect repellent and bug-proof tent netting. Longer- 
than-normal tent stakes are recommended for camping in sandy spots. Shade is scarce. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Cape Point 
Frisco 
Ocracoke 
Oregon Inlet 
Salvo 



202 



126 



136 



120 



130 



14 



14 



14 



14 



14 



Cape Lookout National Seashore 
415 Front Street, P.O. Box 690, Beaufort, NC 28516 

Setting: When campers come to this chain of wild barrier islands off North Carolina's mainland, 
they immerse themselves in a seaside kingdom ruled by waves, wind, tides, and storms. Fifty- 
five miles of wide sandy beaches, dunes, salt marshes, and maritime forests support waterfowl 
and sea life. An 1859 lighthouse and abandoned coastal village are here, too. Park access is by 
boat only. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park. 
RV camping is limited to small tent-campers or 4-wheel-drive trucks with camper tops. 
Special Notes: Commercial ferries transport passengers from Ocracoke, Atlantic, Davis, and 
Harkers Island, North Carolina, to various points in the park from April through October or 
November, depending on the weather. The ferries from Atlantic and Davis will also carry 
4-wheel-drive vehicles. Reservations must be made with ferry operators; contact the park for 
information. Private boats can be anchored offshore. No food, fuel, or other supplies are avail- 
able in the park; the nearest are in towns where ferry services are located. Campers must carry 
out all trash. Mosquitoes and gnats can be bothersome in warmer months; bring insect repel- 
lent and bug-proof tent netting. Longer-than-normal tent stakes are required for camping in 
sandy spots. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Rush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (boat-in, 
boat-and-hike-in, boat-and- 
4WD-in) 



open 



14 



Great Smoky Mountains National Park (see Tennessee) 



75 



North Dakota 



Theodore Roosevelt: Where the spirit of the West lives on. 







Theodore Roosevelt National Park 
P.O. Box 7, Medora, ND 58645 

Setting: The rugged country of badlands and prairies along the Little Missouri River that campers 
see today inspired conservationist ideals in Theodore Roosevelt 100 years ago. A multitude of 
prairie life, including bison, elk, mule deer, wild horses, and prairie dogs, inhabits the broken 
badlands and grass-and-sagebrush plains. The park's units are 72 miles apart; each has camping. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 
Water and flush toilets are available from May to mid-October; the rest of the year water is 
available in the South Unit only and pit toilets are provided. Both campgrounds have wheelchair- 
accessible sites, and both may occasionally fill during mid-summer. 

Group Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year. Reservations are required; contact the 
park after March 1 for the upcoming camping season. Groups must include at least 8 persons. 
Halliday Wells accommodates up to 30 persons and 20 horses; an additional fee is charged for 
horses. Horses are not permitted at Squaw Creek. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park 
on a first-come, first-served basis. A free backcountry permit is required. There are no designated 
backcountry sites or facilities. 

Special Notes: No food, fuel, or other supplies are available in the park; the nearest are from 5 
to 20 miles away from the various campgrounds. Fires are permitted only in grills provided or 
campstoves. Beware of bison and rattlesnakes. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Cottonwood 

Squaw Creek 

Group Campgrounds 

Halliday Wells 

Squaw Creek 

Backcountry Campsites 

North Unit (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 

South Unit (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 



78 • • • 14 • • 


50 • • • 14 • • • 




1 • • • 7 • 


1 • • • 7 • • • 




ltd • 


ltd • 



76 



Oklahoma 



Chickasaw: A fishing expedition. 




Chickasaw National Recreation Area 
P.O. Box 201, Sulphur, OK 73086 

Setting: This hilly region of cold mineral and freshwater springs and streams has been a tradi- 
tional camper's getaway since the turn of the century. Today the Lake of the Arbuckles is a 
popular place for boating and fishing for catfish, largemouth bass, crappie, white bass, and sun- 
fish. Most camping areas are shaded by oak, hickory, and pecan trees. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Buckhorn, Point, and Rock Creek are open all year. The rest of the 
campgrounds are open from spring to fall. All campsites are available on a first-come, first- 
served basis. The limit of stay is as noted below from Memorial Day to Labor Day; the rest of 
the year there is no limit. All campgrounds have wheelchair-accessible restrooms. 
Group Campgrounds: Rock Creek is open all year. The rest of the campgrounds are open from 
spring to fall. Reservations are recommended and will be accepted up to 60 days in advance; call 
the park's Travertine Ranger Station. Groups must include at least 10 persons. The limit of stay 
is as noted below from Memorial Day to Labor Day; the rest of the year there is no limit. All 
campgrounds have wheelchair-accessible restrooms. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Buckhorn— evening ranger programs; Central, Cold Springs, and Rock Creek— coin-operated 
laundry, restaurant, gasoline, evening ranger programs. Tornado season is from May through 
July. In the summer temperatures of 100°F and a relative humidity of 40 percent are common. 
Diesel fuel is available in the nearby communities of Davis and Sulphur. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Rush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Buckhorn 
Cold Springs 
Guy Sandy 

Point 

Rock Creek 

Group Campgrounds 

Buckhorn 

Central 



Cold Springs 



Rock Creek 



184 • • • 14 • • • • 


63 • • • 14 • •• • 


39 • • • 14 • 


52 • • • 14 • • 


106 • • • 14 • • • • 




1 • • • 14 • • • 


12 • • • 14 • •• • 


1 • • • 14 • •• • 


i • • • 14 • •• • 



77 



Oregon 



Crater Lake: Enjoying the pristine landscape of winter. 





^ 



Crater Lake National Park 
P.O. Box 7, Crater Lake, OR 97604 

Setting: Sapphire-blue Crater Lake, the deepest lake in the United States with a depth of 1,932 
feet, is the prime attraction. The lake sits in the collapsed center of a volcano that erupted 
about 6,850 years ago. This region of the Cascade Range also boasts virgin forests of ponderosa 
and lodgepole pine, red fir, and mountain hemlock and summer displays of flowers. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Lost Creek is open from mid-July to mid-September. Mazama is open 
from mid-June through mid-October, weather permitting. Sites at both campgrounds are avail- 
able on a first-come, first-served basis. Each site is limited to 6 persons. Mazama has accessible 
restrooms. The campgrounds sometimes fill up in the summer; campers should arrive by early 
afternoon to get a site. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the 
park. A backcountry permit is required. Stock use and dogs are limited to the Pacific Crest 
Trail. Dogs must be on a leash. Camping overnight with stock is allowed only at Bybee Creek 
horsecamp on the trail. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Mazama— 
evening campfire programs, showers, laundry, and gasoline. Campers should keep a clean camp 
and store food in their vehicles to avoid attracting black bears. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Lost Creek 



Mazama 



Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 



16 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 






198 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


• 




ltd 


• 




14 











78 



Pennsylvania 



Delaware Water Gap: A river to soothe the soul. 




Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area Camping in Pennsylvania 

Bushkill, PA 18324 and New Jersey 

Setting: Camping areas are scattered throughout the long valley of the Delaware River, which 
cut the great slash of the Delaware Water Gap through this hardwood-forested region of the 
Appalachian Mountains. Nearby, tributary streams cascade down to the river through deep 
eroded gorges. Stone houses and other historic structures built by early Dutch settlers are 
preserved. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open from April through October. Reservations 
are recommended; contact the park concessioner at Dingmans Campground, R.D. 2, Box 20, 
Dingmans Ferry, PA 18328. Water and electrical hookups are provided at 60 sites. 
Group Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open from April through October. Reservations are 
required; contact the park. Both campgrounds are for organized groups only. Each site at Hid- 
den Lake and Rivers Bend accommodates a maximum of 25 persons. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is permitted all year along the Delaware River 
and along the Appalachian Trail on a first-come, first-served basis. River sites are only for boat- 
ers on trips of 2 or more days. Trail sites are only for Appalachian Trail hikers on trips of 2 or 
more days. The limit of stay shown below is for any one backcountry site. 
Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Dingmans 
Campground— hot showers, canoe rentals; Hidden Lake and Rivers Bend— ranger programs 
(on request only). Fires are permitted only in designated fire rings or pits, grills provided, and 
campstoves. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campground 

Dingmans Campground 

Group Campgrounds 

Hidden Lake 

Rivers Bend 

Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in, 
boat-in) 



124 



ltd 



14 



14 



14 



79 



Fort Necessity National Battlefield 

The National Pike, R.D. 2, Box 528, Farmington, PA 15437 

Setting: The campground is nestled in the Allegheny Mountains near Fort Necessity Battle- 
field, where, on July 3, 1754, the first shots of the French and Indian War were fired and George 
Washington held his first military command. Besides the events of the French and Indian War 
that were played out here, the National Road, the first federally financed highway, passes through 
the park. It linked the seaboard states to the emerging Ohio Valley and helped travelers and 
settlers overcome the barrier of the Appalachians. Nearby are a reconstruction of Fort Neces- 
sity and the Mount Washington Tavern, a stagecoach inn of the 1800s. Oaks and hickories 
shade today's campers in a peaceful setting. 

Group Campground: The campground is open from early spring to late fall. However, heavy 
snows can make access difficult at times; contact the park for information on road conditions. 
Reservations are required at least 1 week in advance; call the park. The campground is for orga- 
nized youth groups only. Each group is required to perform a 3-hour park conservation project 
and expected to attend park programs such as fort tours and talks. There must be 1 adult leader 
at least 21 years old for every 6 youths. Water is available only from mid- April to mid-October 
at the campground. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Group Campground 



Fort Necessity (walk-in) 1 • 7 



Gettysburg National Military Park 
Gettysburg, PA 17325 

Setting: A secluded, woods-enclosed camping area sits in a corner of Gettysburg Battlefield, 
the bloodiest battlefield of the Civil War. Here, in three July days in 1863, 51,000 men were 
killed or wounded. Many of the Union soldiers who died are buried in the national cemetery 
nearby. It was at the dedication of the cemetery 4 months later that President Abraham Lincoln 
delivered the Gettysburg Address. 

Group Campground: The campground is open from April 1 to November 30. Reservations are 
required; contact the park beginning January 1 for the upcoming camping season. The camp- 
ground is for organized youth groups only. Sites can accommodate up to 35 persons; there must 
be at least 1 adult for every 10 youths. 
Special Notes: Diesel fuel and liquid propane are available in Gettysburg. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Group Campground 



McMillan Wood 13 • 14 



80 



South Carolina 

Kings Mountain National Military Park 
P.O. Box 40, Kings Mountain, NC 28086 

Setting: A dense hardwood forest blankets the ridges and valleys of the lower Kings Mountain 
range as it enters the South Carolina Piedmont. Here, the Kings Mountain National Recrea- 
tional Trail touches the historic Revolutionary War Battlefield of 1780 and traverses the 10,000 
acres of federal and state land in Kings Mountain National Military Park and the adjoining 
state park. Thickets of mountain laurel and stands of oak and tulip poplar provide shelter for 
wild turkey, squirrel, and gray fox amid fading evidence of pioneer farming. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed throughout the year at the desig- 
nated primitive campsite on a first-come, first-served basis; the site is limited to no more than 
10 persons. Campers must register at park headquarters. 

Special Notes: The adjoining state park has a full service campground, picnic area, boating, 
fishing, and swimming. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Backcountry Campsites 



Garner Branch (hike-in) 1 • 7 



81 



South Dakota 

Badlands National Park 
P.O. Box 6, Interior, SD 57750 

Setting: There are colorful views of the water-carved canyons, ridges, rock spires, and knobs 
of the Badlands from every camping area. Campers may see bison, prairie dogs, and other 
animals that inhabit this remnant of the prairie that once stretched uninterrupted across North 
America's heartland. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. How- 
ever, heavy snows and blizzards may close campgrounds for periods from December through 
April. Cedar Pass has water and flush toilets in the summer; the rest of the year no water is 
available and vault toilets are provided. Neither campground has fire grills. 
Group Campground: The campground is open all year. Heavy snows and blizzards can close 
the campground for periods from December through April. Reservations are required from 
Memorial Day to Labor Day; contact the park. Reservations are accepted, but not required, 
the rest of the year. Fires are prohibited. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park 
on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Cedar 
Pass— restaurant, evening ranger programs. In the summer temperatures reach 110°F and severe 
storms, with lightning, hail, and high winds, can occur. Fires are not allowed: use campstoves 
only. Sites at the Sage Creek campground are not marked. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Rush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 



Cedar Pass 



Sage Creek 



Group Campground 



Cedar Pass 



96 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


30 • 


• 




14 










3 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 




ltd 


• 













Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in) 



Wind Cave National Park 

Hot Springs, SD 57747 

Setting: Campers enjoy the sunlit world of rolling prairies and woodlands where bison, elk, and 

pronghorn graze and prairie dog towns thrive, while below them lies the dark side of the park— 

53-mile-long Wind Cave. The cave entrance, just 1 mile from where most campers stay, leads 

to underground chambers of boxwork, frostwork, and other limestone cave formations. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Water and flush toilets are available from May to early October; the rest of the year no water is 

available and chemical toilets are provided. No hookups are available. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year in a portion of the park. A 

backcountry permit is required. All fires and smoking are prohibited. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 

Elk Mountain — restaurant, visitor center, firewood, cave tours, evening campfire programs. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 



Elk Mountain 100 • • • 14 

Backcountry Campsites 



Various locations (hike-in) ltd 



82 



Tennessee 

Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area 

Rt. 3, Box 401, Oneida, TN 37841 

Setting: The scenic gorges of the free-flowing Big South Fork of the Cumberland River and its 

tributaries are an outdoor playground for campers, as well as those who like to canoe, kayak, 

hike, horseback ride, ride mountain bikes, fish, and hunt. Among the special natural wonders 

to be found in the park are waterfalls and rock arches. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Alum Ford and Bandy Creek are open all year. Blue Heron is open 

from early April to early December. All campgrounds are on a first-come, first-served basis. 

RVs are limited to 35 feet in length at Bandy Creek. Accessible sites near wheelchair-accessible 

restrooms are available at Bandy Creek and Blue Heron. 

Group Campground: The campground is open from mid-April through October. Reservations 

are required; call the park. Each site is limited to 75 persons. 

Special Notes: Services available within 1 mile of camping areas include: Bandy Creek— visitor 

center, hot showers, evening ranger programs. Ticks and poisonous snakes are prevalent in 

warm weather. Diesel fuel and propane are available in the surrounding communities. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 



Alum Ford 10 



Bandy Creek 150 



Blue Heron _49_ 

Group Campground 



Bandy Creek 



Cumberland Gap National Historical Park (see Kentucky) 

Great Smoky Mountains National Park Camping in Tennessee and 

Gatlinburg, TN 37738 North Carolina 

Setting: Deep in the Appalachians, one of the Earth's oldest mountain ranges, campers are 
enveloped by a vast Eastern wilderness forest with an extraordinarily rich variety of flora and 
fauna. Black bear and deer abound, as do rustic cabins and barns of early mountain folk. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Cades Cove, Elkmont, and Smokemont are open all year. Reserva- 
tions are required for these campgrounds from May 15 through October 31; see pages 6-7 for 
details. The rest of the year sites at these campgrounds are available on a first-come, first- 
served basis. The other campgrounds are open from April or May to late October on a first- 
come, first-served basis. The limit of stay is as noted below from mid-May through October; 
the rest of the year it is 14 days. Disabled persons can make reservations for sites near wheel- 
chair-accessible restrooms at Cades Cove, Elkmont, and Smokemont from May through Octo- 
ber; see pages 6-7 for details. The rest of the year these sites are first-come, first-served. 
Group Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open from April or May to late October. Reservations 
are required for Cades Cove, Elkmont, and Smokemont from May 15 through October 31; see 
pages 6-7 for details. For reservations at other campgrounds, contact the park; reservations are 
required. The campgrounds are for organized groups only. There are limits to the size of groups 
permitted at each site at each campground. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout the park. Reser- 
vations are required for shelters and restricted sites; write Backcountry Reservations in care of 
the park. A backcountry permit is required. A camping party can include up to 8 persons. Three- 
sided shelters are provided at 18 areas. The limit of stay for each backcountry site is 3 days, or, 
where a shelter is provided, 1 day. The total permitted length of stay in the backcountry is 14 days. 
Special Notes: Services provided seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Balsam 
Mountain and Elkmont— firewood, evening ranger programs; Cades Cove — bike and horse 
rentals, hay rides, firewood, evening ranger programs; Cosby, Deep Creek, and Smokemont— 

83 



horse rentals, firewood, evening ranger programs. Campers should keep a clean camp and store 
food out of sight in vehicles or, in the backcountry, hang it high from trees or provided poles to 
avoid attracting black bears. A recycling program is in effect at most campgrounds. Campers 
should deposit glass, aluminum, and plastic in specially designated trash bins. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Rush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Abrams Creek (Tenn.) 
Balsam Mountain (N.C.) 
Big Creek (N.C.) 



Cades Cove (Tenn.) 

Cataloochee (N.C.) 

Cosby (Tenn.) 

Deep Creek (N.C.) 

Elkmont (Tenn.) 

Look Rock (Tenn.) 

Smokemont (N.C.) 

Group Campgrounds 

Big Creek (N.C.) ~ 

Cades Cove (Tenn.) 

Cattaloochee (N.C.) 

Cosby (Tenn.) 

Deep Creek (N.C.) 

Elkmont (Tenn.) 

Smokemont (N.C.) 

Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 



16 • • 7 • • 


46 • • • 7 • • 


12 • • 7 • • 


161 • • • 7 • •• • 


27 • • • 7 • • 


174 • • • 7 • • • 


123 • • • 7 • • • 


216 • • • 7 • • 


92 • • • 7 • • 


140 • • • 7 • •• 




1 • • 7 • 


4 • • 7 • •• • 


3 • • 7 


3 • • 7 • • • 


3 • • 7 • • • 


4 • • 7 • • 


5 • • 7 • • • 




116 varies 



Natchez Trace Parkway (see Mississippi) 



84 



Texas 

Amistad National Recreation Area 

P.O. Box 420367, Del Rio, TX 78842-0367 

Setting: Built primarily for flood control and water conservation, the dam across the Rio Grande 

that created Lake Amistad reservoir also created a setting for lakeshore camping on the United 

States-Mexico border. Most campers stay in a few concentrated areas around the lake, but 

backcountry campers can stay at many remote spots along the 500 miles of U.S. shoreline below 

the highwater mark. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Group Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year. Reservations are required; contact the 

park. Campgrounds are for organized groups only. Groups must include at least 25 persons. 

One of the sites can accommodate up to 200 persons. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year along the U.S. side of the 

lake below the highwater mark (below contour level 1,144.3 feet) on a first-come, first-served 

basis. The park requests that you pick up a backcountry permit. Lakeshore camping is also 

permitted on the Mexican side; campers must stay within 500 feet of the shoreline. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 

Governors Landing— marina, boat rentals, restaurant, evening ranger programs; San Pedro 

Rat— gasoline, evening ranger programs. A sanitary dump station is located in the park; the 

nearest campground, Governors Landing, is 2 miles away. Diesel fuel is available at Diablo 

East Marina, 2 miles from Governors Landing. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 



Governors Landing 



San Pedro Flat 



Spur 406 



277 North 



277 South 



Group Campgrounds 



Rock Quarry 



San Pedro Rat 



277 North 



18 • • 15 • 


22 • • 15 • 


6 • • 15 


13 • • 15 


4 • • 15 




1 • • 15 


1 • • 15 • 


1 • • 15 




ltd • 15 



Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (boat-in) 



Big Bend National Park 
Big Bend National Park, TX 79834 

Setting: The banks of the Rio Grande, the nearly 8,000-foot Chisos Mountains, and the Chi- 
huahuan Desert all provide places to camp. Plant and animal life varies with each environ- 
ment, with willows, beavers, and many birds thriving in the river community; pinyon, juniper, 
ponderosa pine, and whitetailed deer in the mountains; and cactus and kangaroo rats in 
the desert. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Rio Grande Village (A), Basin, Cottonwood, and Rio Grande Village 
Trailer Park are open all year. Rio Grande Village (B), a less developed section of Rio Grande 
Village, is open only around the Easter holiday season and during Thanksgiving week in Novem- 
ber. All sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Rio Grande Village Trailer Park, 
which is operated by a park concessioner, has water, sewer, and electrical hookups for RVs. 
Persons towing trailers more than 20 feet long or driving motorhomes more than 24 feet long 
are discouraged from trying to camp at Basin because the access road is narrow, winding, and 
has a steep 15 percent grade. 



85 



Group Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year. Reservations are required; contact the 
park up to 90 days in advance. Campgrounds are for organized groups only. Basin accommo- 
dates from 3 to 5 persons at smaller sites, and from 8 to 12 persons at larger sites. The Cotton- 
wood site accommodates from 10 to 30 persons. Rio Grande Village (A) sites accommodate up 
to 20 persons at smaller sites and up to 40 at larger ones. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park 
on a first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Basin— restaurant, horse rentals, evening ranger programs; Cottonwood— gasoline station; 
Rio Grande Village (A and B) — hot showers, coin-operated laundry, gasoline station, visitor 
center, evening ranger programs. Access points to Mexico are located within 1 mile of Cotton- 
wood and Rio Grande Village; entry is by foot and boat. Summer temperatures can reach 105°F 
and above. Diesel fuel is available in Terlingua, 26 miles away. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Basin 



Cottonwood 



Rio Grande Village (A) 

RToGrande Village (B) 

Rio Grande Village Trailer 
Park 

Group Campgrounds 

Basin 

Cottonwood 

Rio Grande Village (A) 

Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in, 
4WD-in, horseback ride-in, 
boat-in) 



63 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


• 


35 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 






• 


100 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


• 


200 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 




• 


• 


25 • 




• 


14 


• 




• 


• 




12 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


• 


1 


• 


• 


14 


• 






• 


4 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


• 




ltd 


• 




14 











Guadalupe Mountains National Park 
H.C. 60, Box 400, Salt Flat, TX 79847-9400 

Setting: Just as early westward-bound travelers welcomed the sight of the landmark Guadalupe 
Mountains on the edge of the Texas desert, so, too, will today's campers. The variety of camp- 
ing areas include shady spots near the imposing 8,085-foot El Capitan peak, juniper-oak wood- 
lands in canyons, and, in the backcountry, forests of Douglas-fir, limber pine, and ponderosa 
pine. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. Both 
campgrounds have several walk-in tent sites. Grills are not provided in Pine Springs; fires there 
must be made in campstoves. Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are available in both camp- 
grounds; some assistance may be needed to reach the restroom in Dog Canyon. 
Group Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year. Reservations are recommended for Pine 
Springs; call the park. Each Pine Springs site accommodates a minimum of 10 and maximum 
of 20 persons. The Dog Canyon site, available on a first-come, first-served basis, accommo- 
dates a minimum of 6 and maximum of 12 persons. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park 
on a first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. Horses are not permitted 
in the backcountry overnight. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Pine 
Springs— evening ranger programs. Wood and charcoal fires are prohibited at Pine Springs 
and in the backcountry, but charcoal fires are permitted at Dog Canyon. Fires are permitted in 



86 



campstoves at Pine Springs and in the backcountry. Campers should be prepared for strong 
winds, which occasionally reach speeds of up to 80 to 100 miles per hour in February, March, 
and April. Diesel fuel is available in White City, N. Mex., 35 miles away. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Dog Canyon 



Pine Springs 



Group Campgrounds 



Dog Canyon 



Pine Springs 



Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in) 



23 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


45 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 




1 


• 




14 


• 


• 


2 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 




ltd 


• 




14 







Lake Meredith National Recreation Area 

P.O. Box 1460, Fritch, TX 79036 

Setting: The refreshing waters of Lake Meredith reservoir, the Canadian River, and smaller 

streams are one of the main reasons campers come to these otherwise arid, windswept plains. 

The flatlands are broken by canyons, buttes, and pinnacles. Along the water cottonwoods and 

willows add a touch of green. In drier regions mesquite, prickly pear, and prairie grasses grow. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. No 

hookups are available. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 

Harbor Bay— coin-operated laundry, gasoline station, restaurant; Sanford-Yake— marina. Diesel 

fuel is available in the nearby communities of Amarillo, Borger, Dumas, and Fritch. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Rush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Bates Canyon 
Big Blue 
Blue West 



Bugbee Canyon 



Cedar Canyon 



Fritch Fortress 



Harbor Bay 



McBride Canyon 



Mullinaw Canyon 



Plum Creek 



Rosita 



Sanford-Yake 



Spring Canyon 



25 • • 14 • 


20 • • 14 


40 • • 14 • 


25 • • 14 


30 • • 14 • • • 


10 • • 14 • • • • 


19 • • 14 • • 


10 • • 14 • 


10 • • 14 


15 • • 14 • 


25 • • 14 • 


53 • • 14 • • • • 


6 • • 14 • 



Padre Island National Seashore 

9405 South Padre Island Drive, Corpus Christi, TX 78418-5597 

Setting: This barrier island in the Gulf of Mexico just off the Texas mainland offers camping 

throughout much of its 68 miles of wide sandy beaches, dunes, and grassy flats. A multitude of 

marine life and waterfowl populates the island and its waters. Backcountry camping areas are 

on the Gulf beach and on islands in the Laguna Madre. 



87 



Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 

The campground usually fills up on spring and summer holiday weekends. 

Group Campground: The campground is open all year. Reservations are required; contact 

the park. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year along the Gulf Coast and on 

the Laguna Madre islands not posted as rookeries for nesting birds. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 

Malaquite Beach— outdoor rinse-off showers, bathhouse open during operating hours, evening 

ranger programs. In the summer temperatures can reach 95°F and the relative humidity is usually 

above 70 percent. Diesel fuel is available in Corpus Christi, 20 miles away. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 

Bird Island Beach ltd • • 



Malaquite Beach 42 



North Beach open 



South Beach open 

Group Campground 

Group Camp 1 



Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (boat-in, ltd 

hike-in, 4 WD-in) 



88 



Utah 

Arches National Park 
P.O. Box 907, Moab, UT 84532 

Setting: Landscape Arch, Delicate Arch, and more than 1,500 other arches are concentrated 
in the redrock country of this park, and campers are rarely more than a short drive or hike 
from one of the natural spans. Other creations of erosion— balanced rocks, sandstone fins, and 
oddly shaped pedestals and spires— are scattered throughout the area. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 
Water and flush toilets are available from mid-March to mid-October; the rest of the year water 
is not available and pit toilets are provided. Accessible toilets and one accessible campsite are 
available. The campground usually fills by early to mid-day from March to mid-October. 
Group Campground: The campground is open all year. Water and flush toilets are available 
from mid-March to mid-October; the rest of the year water is not available and pit toilets are 
provided. Reservations are required and are accepted beginning on January 2 for that calendar 
year; contact the park at 801-259-8161. Groups must include at least 10 persons. One site accom- 
modates up to 35 persons; the other, 55. Wheelchair-accessible toilets are available. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park. 
A backcountry permit is required. No backcountry trails or campsites are designated. 
Special Notes: No food, fuel, or other supplies are available in the park; the nearest are 23 
miles away in Moab, Utah. Fires are permitted only in grills provided or campstoves. Firewood 
gathering is prohibited. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 



Devils Garden 53 

Group Campground 



Devils Garden (walk-in) 2 • • 7 

Backcountry Campsites 



Various locations (hike-in) ltd 



Bryce Canyon National Park 
Bryce Canyon, UT 84717 

Setting: The colorful eroded wonderland of rock spires, pedestals, and other geologic sculp- 
tures known as Bryce Canyon is no more than a stone's throw away from all camping areas. 
Most campsites are within walking distance of the canyon rim in forests of ponderosa pine on 
the 8,000-foot-high Paunsaugunt Plateau, but there are backcountry sites below in Bryce Can- 
yon itself. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: North is open all year. Sunset is open from about mid-May through 
September. Sites at both campgrounds are available on a first-come, first-served basis. North 
campground has wheelchair-accessible restrooms. The campgrounds usually fill by late after- 
noon or early evening from Memorial Day weekend to Labor Day weekend. 
Group Campground: The campground is open from about mid-May through September. Res- 
ervations are recommended; contact the park. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed in the southern part of Bryce Can- 
yon from spring to fall on a first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. 
The limit of stay listed below is for a specific campsite; the total permitted length of stay in the 
backcountry is 14 days. Each of 10 sites accommodates up to 6 persons; 2 sites each accommo- 
date up to 15. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
North and Sunset— hot showers, coin-operated laundry, restaurant, horse rentals, visitor center, 
evening ranger programs. Fires are permitted only in grills provided or campstoves. Firewood 
gathering is prohibited. Gasoline and diesel fuel are available just outside the park entrance. 



89 



Zion: Creating memories to take home. 




Bryce Canyon continued 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

North 

Sunset 

Group Campground 

Sunset 

Backcountry Campsites 
Various locations (hike-in) 



105 



14 



101 



14 



14 



11 



14 



Canyonlands National Park 
125 West 200 South, Moab, UT 84532 

Setting: This Colorado Plateau wilderness provides many opportunities for campers, as well as 
hikers, 4-wheel-drive enthusiasts, and mountain bikers. Campgrounds are found in the Island 
in the Sky and Needles districts of the park. Backcountry camping is found throughout the park. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Two modest campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served 
basis. Water is available at Squaw Flat only from April through September; water is available 
all year within 1 mile at Needles District headquarters. No water is available at Willow Flat or 
Island in the Sky District; hookups and dump stations are not available anywhere. Campgrounds 
may fill by mid-day during the peak seasons of March-May and August-October. Maximum site 
capacity is 10 persons and 2 vehicles. 

Group Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year; all are in the Needles District. Reserva- 
tions are required; contact the park. Squaw Flat accommodates up to 50 persons and 10 vehi- 
cles; Wooden Shoe, up to 25 persons and 5 vehicles; and Split Top Cave, up to 15 persons and 
3 vehicles. Minimum group size is 11 persons. All camping areas are within 2 miles of the 
Squaw Flat tent/RV campground, where water is available seasonally. Water is available all 
year within 1 mile of each of the camping areas at Needles District headquarters. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year on a first-come, first-served 
basis throughout much of the park. A backcountry permit is required and is available free at 
visitor centers or ranger stations. Backcountry campsites for 4-wheel-drive vehicles or mountain 
bikes are located along the White Rim in the Island in the Sky District. Reservations (accepted 
by mail only) are recommended well in advance. Apply to the White Rim Reservation Office. 



90 



Cedar Breaks: Wildflowers for photographing, not picking. 






5 
o 

e 

o 
Q 



to 
Q 



Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Squaw Rat 
and Willow Flat— evening ranger programs. No food, fuel, or other supplies are available in the 
park; the nearest towns, Moab and Monticello, Utah, are more than 40 miles away. Fires are per- 
mitted only in grills provided, designated fire rings, or campstoves. Firewood gathering is pro- 
hibited. Summer temperatures commonly reach 100°F and above. Backcountry campers should 
avoid camping in low-lying areas, which are prone to flash floods in late summer and fall. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Squaw Flat 

Willow Flat 

Group Campgrounds 

Split Top Cave 

Squaw Flat 

Wooden Shoe 

Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in, 
4WD-in, mountain bike-in) 



26 • 


• 


• 


7 • 


12 • 


• 




7 




1 • 


• 


• 


7 


1 • 


• 


• 


7 


1 • 


• 


• 


7 




ltd 


• 




varies 



Capitol Reef National Park 
Torrey, UT 84775 

Setting: A variety of red, yellow, orange, and white rock cliffs predominantly carved from the 
Waterpocket Fold— a 100-mile-long buckling of the Earth's surface— sets the outdoor stage for 
campers. Camping areas range from the historic site of the oasis-like Mormon pioneer commu- 
nity of Fruita on the banks of the Fremont River to more remote outposts in the desert. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. Flush 
toilets are provided from April to November, pit toilets the rest of the year. 
Group Campground: The campground, for organized groups only, is open all year. Reservations 
are required; contact the park. Each site accommodates 20 persons; limited parking is available. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park 
on a first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. 
Special Notes: Cathedral Valley and Cedar Mesa are accessible only via dirt roads; contact the 



91 



park for up-to-date road conditions. No food, fuel, or other supplies are available in the park; 
the nearest are about 10 miles away in Torrey, Utah. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Cathedral Valley (high- 
clearance 2WD-in) 

Cedar Mesa (high-clearance 
2WD-in) 

Fruita 

Group Campground 

Fruita 

Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in) 



5 i 




14 








5 i 


» 14 


70 • i 


> • 


14 


• 


• 


• 






2 • i 


I • 


14 


• 










ltd i 





Cedar Breaks National Monument 
P.O. Box 749, Cedar City, UT 84720 

Setting: Highcountry spruce-fir forests near the colorful Cedar Breaks Amphitheater, a huge 
bowl-shaped masterpiece of erosion carved from the side of the 10,000-foot-high Markagunt 
Plateau, shelter the main camping area. Subalpine meadows nearby fill with wildflowers in 
spring and summer. Some backcountry camping is done in the amphitheater. 
Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open from mid-June to mid-September on a first- 
come, first-served basis. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year below 9,000 feet in the amphi- 
theater. The park requests that campers notify a ranger of their plans before starting their trip. 
Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Point 
Supreme— visitor center, evening ranger programs. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 



Point Supreme 



29 



14 



Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in) 



ltd 



Glen Canyon National Recreation Area Camping in Arizona and 

P.O. Box 1507, Page, AZ 86040 Utah 

Setting: The damming of the Colorado River and the creation of 186-mile-long Lake Powell 
more than 25 years ago created a dramatic landscape of blue water and desert slickrock ideal 
for boating, waterskiing, fishing, swimming, and lakeshore camping. Those who want to experi- 
ence the place as it was before Glen Canyon Dam can backcountry camp away from the lake. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year. Bullfrog, Halls Crossing, Hite, Lees 
Ferry, and Wahweap sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Limit of stay is 14 
days at one time, 30 days per year. Reservations are accepted for campgrounds run by park 
concessioners at Bullfrog, Halls Crossing, and Wahweap. For reservations, contact: Bullfrog 
Resort and Marina, P.O. Box 4055-Bullfrog, Lake Powell, UT 84533; Halls Crossing Resort and 
Marina, P.O. Box 5101-Halls, Lake Powell, UT 84533; or Wahweap Lodge and Marina, P.O. 
Box 1597, Page, AZ 86040. All concession campgrounds have water, electrical, and sewage 
hookups for RVs. Hite is within 1 mile of drinking water at Hite Marina. 

Group Campgrounds: At Wahweap only the campsites are open all year. Reservations are re- 
quired; contact the park. The campsites are primarily for organized groups of 10 or more per- 
sons. The limit is 20 per site. One site is accessible for the disabled. 



92 



Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park 
on a first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required only for the Escalante Can- 
yon region. Group size is limited to 12 persons for camping in areas inaccessible by boat. 
Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas are: 
Bullfrog and Bullfrog (concession) — hot showers, coin-operated laundry, restaurant, gasoline 
station, marina, boat rentals, boat tours, evening ranger programs; Halls Crossing and Halls 
Crossing (concession) — hot showers, coin-operated laundry, marina, boat rentals, boat tours; 
Hite— marina, boat rentals; Lees Ferry— evening ranger programs; Wahweap and Wahweap 
(concession) — hot showers, coin-operated laundry, restaurant, gasoline station, marina, boat 
rentals, boat tours, evening ranger programs. Fires are permitted only in grills provided, fire 
pans, or campstoves. Camping is prohibited in Rainbow Bridge National Monument, which is 
adjacent to the recreation area. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Bullfrog 

Bullfrog (concession) 

Halls Crossing 

Halls Crossing (concession) 

Hite (undeveloped) 

Lees Ferry 

Wahweap 

Wahweap (concession) 

Group Campgrounds 

Bullfrog 

Wahweap 

Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in, boat-in) 



86 • • • 14 • •• • 


25 • • • • •• • 


65 • • • 14 • •• • 


32 • • • • •• • 


ltd • • 14 • 


58 • • • 14 • • 


178 • • • 14 • • • • 


123 • • • • • • • 




ltd • • • 14 • • • • 


7 • • • 14 • •• • 




ltd • 30 



Hovenweep National Monument Camping in Utah 

McElmo Route, Cortez, CO 81321 

Setting: The campground is perched on a mesa in a pinyon-juniper forest above Little Ruin 

Canyon, the location of Square Tower, the best preserved of many prehistoric Anasazi Indian 

ruins in the park. From the campground there are colorful views of the surrounding mesa-and- 

canyon country and distant mountain ranges. Park access is by dirt roads only. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Water and flush toilets are provided from mid-April to mid-November; the rest of the year 

water is available x k mile away at a ranger station and pit toilets are provided. 

Special Notes: Park access roads can be difficult to travel during or after rainstorms; contact 

the park for up-to-date road conditions. Gnats can be bothersome in May and June; bring insect 

repellent and bug-proof tent netting. Climbing on prehistoric ruins is prohibited. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campground 

Square Tower 



31 



14 



93 



Natural Bridges National Monument 
Box 1, Lake Powell, UT 84533 

Setting: The camping areas serve as gateways to more remote country where three large natu- 
ral sandstone bridges created by stream erosion are located. A nearby scenic drive leads to 
bridge overlooks and trails lead to the bridges themselves. The bridges— named Owachomo, 
Sipapu, and Kachina— range from 180 to 268 feet in length and 106 to 220 feet in height. 
Archeological sites can also be seen from Bridge View Drive. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 
Water is available within V2 mile of the campground at the visitor center. RVs up to 21 feet 
long are permitted. Sites accommodate 9 persons and one vehicle. The campground sometimes 
fills by early afternoon from May to October. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Natural 
Bridges— visitor center, evening ranger programs. No food, fuel, or other supplies are available 
in the park; the nearest are 40 miles east in Blanding. During summer thunderstorms avoid 
high exposed areas prone to lightning strikes. Firewood gathering is prohibited. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 



Natural Bridges 13 • • 7 



Zion National Park 
Springdale, UT 84767-1099 

Setting: Campers can stay along the cottonwood-shaded banks of the Virgin River in Zion Can- 
yon, a 2,000-foot-deep gorge with colorful eroded cliffs of sandstone. A more remote camping 
area is available in a highcountry forest of ponderosa pine, pinyon, and juniper atop the Kolob 
Plateau. The backcountry lures campers even further into this precipitous canyon country. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Watchman is open all year, South from March through October, and 
Lava Point usually from May to October. All sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. 
The limit of stay is as noted below from May to October; the limit is extended the rest of the 
year. South and Watchman have accessible sites near wheelchair-accessible restrooms. The 
campgrounds fill on most summer weekends; arrive by noon to secure a site for the weekend. 
Group Campground: The campground is open from March through November. Reservations 
are required; contact the park. The campground is for organized groups only. Groups of 9-40 
persons are allowed per site, depending on the site size. Four cars or one bus is allowed per site. 
Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park. 
A backcountry permit is required. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Watchman and South— hot showers, restaurants, visitor center, Zion Nature Center (for chil- 
dren ages 6 through 12), evening ranger programs. Fires are permitted only in grills provided or 
campstoves. Summer temperatures regularly reach 100°F and higher at lower elevations. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Lava Point 
South 



Watchman 



Group Campground 



Watchman 



Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in) 



6 • 


• 




14 










146 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


• 


228 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


• 




7 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


• 




ltd 


• 















94 



Virginia 

Blue Ridge Parkway (see North Carolina) 

Cumberland Gap National Historical Park (see Kentucky) 

Prince William Forest Park 
P.O. Box 209, Triangle, VA 22172 

Setting: What once were intensively farmed fields is today a woodland wilderness outdoor rec- 
reation area where hikers, anglers, bicyclists, campers, and others, can enjoy a land reclaimed 
by nature. This eastern deciduous forest in the rolling hills of the Piedmont coastal plain harbors 
whitetailed deer, wild turkey, raccoons, otter, beavers, fox, ruffed grouse, and other woodland 
creatures. A 35-mile trail system meanders along the several streams in the park's Quantico 
Creek watershed. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Oak Ridge is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. RVs up 
to 18 feet long are permitted. Each site is limited to 6 persons. Prince William Travel Trailer 
Village is also open all year. Reservations are recommended; contact the park concessioner at 
Travel Trailer Village, 16058 Dumfries Rd., Dumfries, VA 22026. Electrical, water, and sewage 
hookups for RVs are available at all village sites. RVs up to 35 feet long are permitted. Both 
campgrounds have wheelchair-accessible sites and restrooms. 

Group Campgrounds: Turkey Run Ridge is open all year. Reservations are accepted by mail; 
write the park for a camping application. Sites accommodate up to 40 persons. Rustic camps 
(dating from the Civilian Conservation Corps era) are available from April to mid-October. 
Each camp includes sleeping cabins, central kitchen and dining hall, restrooms, hot showers, 
and firewood. Reservations are made by applying from October 1 to December 1 for spring 
and summer camping and from March 1 to May 1 for the fall camping season. The five Cabin 
Camps vary in capacity. Groups are charged for utilities besides the camping fee. Groups must 
bring all linens and cooking utensils. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed from May 15 through September at 
sites shown below. Reservations can be made by writing the park or appearing in person. A 
backcountry permit is required. Most sites are limited to 4 persons; no open fires permitted. 
Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Cabin 
Camps— ranger programs by reservation (see "Group Campgrounds" for information on other 
special services provided); Oak Ridge— firewood, evening ranger programs; Travel Trailer Vil- 
lage—hot showers, coin-operated laundry, swimming pool; Turkey Run Ridge— firewood, 
ranger programs by reservation. Fires are permitted only in grills provided, designated fire rings, 
or campstoves. Diesel fuel is available nearby. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 



Oak Ridge 



Travel Trailer Village 
Group Campgrounds 



Cabin Camps 



Turkey Run Ridge 



Backcountry Campsites 

Chopawamsic designated 
sites (hike-in) 



80 • 


• 


• 


14 • 


• 




79 • 




• 


14 • 


• 


• 




5 




• 


varies • 


• 




6 • 


• 


• 


7 • 


• 






10 


• 




7 







Shenandoah National Park 

Route 4, Box 348, Luray, VA 22835 

Setting: In a part of the Blue Ridge Mountains where homes and farms once stood, campers 

can escape to a wilderness where forests of oak, hickory, and evergreens now grow and black 



95 



bear and whitetail deer roam. All camping areas except backcountry sites are along Virginia's 
Skyline Drive, which starts at Front Royal (milepost 0) and ends near Waynesboro (milepost 105). 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: All campgrounds except Big Meadows are open from May through 
October on a first-come, first-served basis. Big Meadows is open from March through Decem- 
ber. From mid-May through October, reservations can be made for Big Meadows; see pages 6-7 
for details. The rest of the camping season its sites are on a first-come, first-served basis. Acces- 
sible sites next to wheelchair-accessible restrooms are available at all campgrounds. In May, 
October, and in the summer, campgrounds fill up for the weekend by Friday evening. 
Group Campground: The campground is open from mid-May through October. Reservations 
are recommended; call the park. The campground is for non-commercial groups only. A maxi- 
mum of 20 persons per site is permitted. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park 
on a first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. The limit of stay noted 
below is for any one campsite; there is no limit on the total length of stay in the backcountry. 
Special Notes: Skyline Drive may be closed in the winter due to snow. Services available sea- 
sonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: Mathews Arm and Lewis Mountain— 
evening ranger programs; Big Meadows— hot showers, coin-operated laundry, restaurant, 
gasoline station, wagon rides, visitor center, evening ranger programs; Loft Mountain— hot show- 
ers, coin-operated laundry, snack bar, gasoline station, evening ranger programs. Campers are 
required to keep a clean camp and store food in vehicles or, in the backcountry, hang it high 
from trees to avoid attracting black bears. Milepost numbers along Skyline Drive are listed 
after each campground name below. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Mathews Arm 22.2 
Big Meadows 51 



Lewis Mountain 57.5 

Loft Mountain 79.5 

Group Campground 

Dundo 83.7 ~ 

Backcountry Campsites 
Various locations (hike-in) 



186 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


• 


227 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


• 


31 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 




• 


221 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


• 




7 


• 


• 


14 


• 










ltd 


• 




2 











96 



Virgin Islands 

Virgin Islands National Park 

P.O. Box 7789, Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, VI 00801 

Setting: The days when Christopher Columbus first sailed in this tropical paradise are long gone, 
but campers can still find enticing turquoise waters, sandy beaches, brilliant flowers, and multi- 
colored reef fishes and corals. Bayshore camping areas are on St. John, the smallest of the 
three major U.S. islands. Island access is by boat and seaplane only. 

Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year. Three types of camping opportuni- 
ties are available. There are 12 bare tent sites where campers provide their own tents and all 
their own camping gear; 60 sites where canvas tents for 4 to 6 persons are provided; and 40 
one-room screened-in cottages that sleep 4 to 6. Provisions supplied at the latter two include 
cots, bedding linen, cooking and eating utensils, charcoal grill, gas stove, and ice chest. Reser- 
vations are required for all camping and can be made up to 8 months in advance. Persons 
wanting bare tent sites should contact the park concessioner at Cinnamon Bay Campground, 
P.O. Box 720, Cruz Bay, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands 00830. Persons wanting tent sites with 
tents provided or cottages can contact the concessioner at Cinnamon Bay Campground or at 
Rockresorts Reservations, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, Room 5400, New York City, NY 10112. The 
limit of stay is as noted below from December 15 to April 15; the rest of the year it is 21 days. 
Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are available in the campground. The campground is usually 
booked up well in advance for the December 15 to April 15 camping period. 
Group Campground: The campground is open all year. Eight 4-to-6-person canvas tents are 
provided at each site, along with cots, linen, cooking and eating utensils, charcoal grill, gas 
stove, and ice chest. Reservations are required; they can be made up to 8 months in advance. 
Persons should contact the park concessioner at Cinnamon Bay Campground or Rockresorts 
Reservations (see addresses above). The campground is for organized groups only. The limit 
of stay is as noted below from December 15 to April 15; the rest of the year it is 21 days. 
Special Notes: A commercial passenger boat ferries visitors year-round from St. Thomas, Vir- 
gin Islands, to a landing dock on St. John in Cruz Bay, about 5 miles from the campgrounds. 
Taxis are available on St. John to transport persons to the campgrounds. Services available 
seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: Cinnamon Bay— cold showers, 
evening ranger programs, water sports center with sailing, scuba, and snorkeling tours and scuba, 
snorkeling, and windsurfing gear rentals. Pets are not permitted in the camping areas. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 



Cinnamon Bay 110 % #14 

Group Campground 



Cinnamon Bay 2 • • 14 



97 



Washington 

Coulee Dam National Recreation Area 
P.O. Box 37, Coulee Dam, WA 991 16 

Setting: Lake Roosevelt, a 151-mile-long reservoir fed by the waters of the Columbia River and 
created by Grand Coulee Dam, is the centerpiece around which a variety of camping areas are 
found. Campers can choose from a range of settings, from the arid sagebrush hills in the south 
to the cooler pine-fir forests to the north. Fishing, boating, and waterskiing are popular activities. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: All campgrounds except Porcupine Bay are open all year. Water and 
flush toilets are provided at these campgrounds (where noted below) from April to mid-October; 
the rest of the year water is not available and pit toilets are provided. Porcupine Bay is open 
from May through October. Water and flush toilets are provided at Hunters from June to mid- 
October; the rest of the year water is not available and pit toilets are provided. All sites are 
available on a first-come, first-served basis. The maximum trailer length permitted at Hawk 
Creek and Keller Ferry is 16 feet; at Gifford, Marcus Island, and Porcupine Bay, 20 feet; and at 
Evans, Fort Spokane, Haag Cove, Hunters, Kettle Falls, and Spring Canyon, 26 feet. Wheelchair- 
accessible restrooms are available at Evans, Fort Spokane, Keller Ferry, Kettle Falls, Porcu- 
pine Bay, and Spring Canyon. 

Group Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year. Reservations are recommended; con- 
tact the park. Campgrounds are for organized groups only. Fort Spokane accommodates up to 
75 persons; Kettle Falls, up to 150; and Spring Canyon, up to 20. The maximum trailer length 
permitted at each campground is 26 feet. Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are provided at Fort 
Spokane, Kettle Falls, and Spring Canyon. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year at lakeside sites shown below 
on a first-come, first-served basis. 

Special Notes: Backcountry campsites are accessible by boat only; the other camping areas 
can be reached by boat and by road. However, because of fluctuations in the lake level and 
winter freezing of portions of the lake, some sites are not accessible by boat all year; contact 
the park for up-to-date lake conditions. Services available seasonally or within 1 mile of camp- 
ing areas include: Fort Spokane— guided fort tours, ranger programs; Keller Ferry and Spring 
Canyon — ranger programs. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Bradbury Beach 

Cloverleaf 

Evans 

Fort Spokane 

Gifford 

Haag Cove 

Hawk Creek 

Hunters 

Jones Bay 

Kamloops 

Keller Ferry 

Kettle Falls 

Kettle River 

Marcus Island 

North Gorge 

Porcupine Bay 

Snag Cove 

Spring Canyon 



5 • i 


1 14 i 




8 • i 


> 14 i 




46 • i 


> • 


14 i 


1 • 


• 




67 • i 


> • 


14 i 


1 • 


• 


• 


47 • i 


> • 


14 i 


> • 


18 • 1 


> 14 i 




16 • i 


I 14 i 




42 • 1 


» • 


14 i 


I • 


• 




4 • i 


> 14 




14 • i 


> 14 i 




55 • 1 


» • 


14 4 


> • 


• 




77 • i 


» • 


14 i 


1 • 


• 




20 • i 


> < 




20 • i 


» • 


14 i 




10 • i 


> 14 i 




31 • i 


» • 


14 i 


1 • 


• 




6 • i 


> 14 i 




87 • 4 


> • 


14 < 


1 • 


• 





98 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Group Campgrounds 

Fort Spokane 
Kettle Falls 

Spring Canyon 

Backcountry Campsites 

Crystal Cove (boat-in) 
Detillion (boat-in) 
Enterprise (boat-in) 
Halverson Canyon (boat-in) 
Penix Canyon (boat-in) 
Plum Point (boat-in) 
Ponderosa (boat-in) 
Sherman Creek (boat-in) 
Summer Island (boat-in) 



1 • • • 14 • •• • 


1 • • • 14 • • • 


1 • • • 14 • •• • 




4 • 14 


12 • 14 


12 • 14 


1 • 14 


3 • 14 


4 • 14 


7 • 14 


6 • 14 


4 • 14 



Mount Rainier National Park 
Tahoma Woods, Star Route, Ashford, WA 98304 

Setting: The grandeur that lures mountaineers to the summit of 14,410-foot Mount Rainier 
draws campers to its lower slopes, where campgrounds nestle amid stands of Douglas-fir, west- 
ern red cedar, and hemlock. This ancient— but not extinct— volcano of the Cascade Range 
also boasts subalpine meadows, where flowers bloom in July and August, and glaciers. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Sunshine Point is open all year. The rest of the campgrounds are open 
from May or June to September or October; exact dates depend on the weather. All sites are 
available on a first-come, first-served basis. Cougar Rock has a few wheelchair-accessible sites 
and restrooms. 

Group Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open from late May to mid-October; exact dates depend 
on the weather. Reservations are required; call the park. Reservations are accepted up to 90 
days in advance. Cougar Rock sites accommodate from 12 to 30 campers. Ipsut Creek sites 
accommodate from 20 to 30 campers. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the 
park on a first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. 
Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Cougar 
Rock, Ipsut Creek, Ohanapecosh, and White River— evening ranger programs. Hot showers 
are provided at Paradise Visitor Center; the nearest campground, Cougar Rock, is 10 miles 
away. Campers should be prepared for inclement weather throughout the year. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Cougar Rock 
Ipsut Creek 



Ohanapecosh 



Sunshine Point 



White River 



Group Campgrounds 



Cougar Rock 



Ipsut Creek 



Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in) 



200 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


29 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 






232 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


18 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 






117 • 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 






5 


• 


• 


14 


• 


• 


• 


2 


• 


• 


14 


• 








ltd 


• 













99 



North Cascades National Park Service Complex 
2105 Highway 20, Sedro Woolley, WA 98284 

Setting: Three adjacent park areas— North Cascades National Park, Lake Chelan National Rec- 
reation Area, and Ross Lake National Recreation Area— have camping areas from their large 
man-made lakes to their lofty, snow-topped Cascade Range peaks. Stehekin Valley, surrounded 
by towering mountains, is particularly popular with campers. Access to the park complex var- 
ies (see "Special Notes" below). 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Harlequin and Purple Point are open from mid-spring to mid-fall. 
Goodell Creek is open all year. Water is available at Goodell Creek only from spring through 
fall. Colonial Creek is open from mid-April to mid-October. Hozomeen is open from early May 
through October. Newhalem is open from mid-June to Labor Day. Campsites at all these camp- 
grounds are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Diablo Lake Resort is open all year 
and reservations are accepted; contact the park concessioner at Diablo Lake Resort, Rockport, 
WA 98283. The maximum trailer length recommended at Colonial Creek, Goodell Creek, Hoz- 
omeen, and Newhalem Creek is 22 feet. Colonial Creek and Newhalem Creek have wheelchair- 
accessible campsites and toilets. 

Group Campground: Goodell Creek is open all year. Bridge Creek and Harlequin are open in 
the summer. Reservations are required for all campgrounds; contact the park. Bridge Creek 
and Harlequin are both in the backcountry; a backcountry permit is required. All campgrounds 
are for organized groups only. The maximum trailer length recommended in part of Goodell 
Creek is 22 feet; trailers are not recommended in the other portion of the campground. Bridge 
Creek and Harlequin can each accommodate from 10 to 20 persons. See "Backcountry Camp- 
sites" below for information on other backcountry group camping. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park 
complex on a first-come, first-served basis. Some campsites can be reserved up to 30 days in ad- 
vance by writing: Wilderness District, North Cascades National Park, Marblemount, WA 98267. 
Free permits are required for overnight stays. Sites can be reached by hiking, boating, and on 
horseback. Organized groups of up to 12 persons can camp along Ross Lake at Boundary Bay, 
Green Point, McMillian, Ponderosa, and Silver Creek. 

Special Notes: Campers can reach Stehekin Valley campsites by taking a passenger boat and 
shuttlebus, by taking a floatplane and shuttlebus, or by hiking. The boat leaves from Fields Point 
just outside Chelan, Washington, at the southern end of Lake Chelan and lands at Stehekin, 
the main entry point for campers into Stehekin Valley. The plane leaves from Chelan and also 
lands at Stehekin. From Stehekin campers can board a shuttlebus that will drop them off near 
Stehekin Valley campsites. The 23-mile shuttlebus road is remote and not connected to any 
other roads. The boat is available on a first-come, first-served basis all year; it runs daily in the 
summer, less frequently the rest of the year. The plane is available all year by reservation only. 
The shuttlebus runs daily on a first-come, first-served basis from about May 15 to October 15; 
a fee is charged. For information on transportation services, contact the park. Stehekin has hot 
showers, coin-operated laundry, visitor center, and evening programs; Purple Point and Weaver 
Point are within 1 mile. Other services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas 
include: Colonial Creek, Goodell Creek, Hozomeen, and Newhalem Creek— evening ranger 
programs; Diablo Lake Resort— restaurant, gasoline station, boat rentals; Green Point— boat 
rentals at Ross Lake Resort (trail or boat access only). Washington State Highway 20, the only 
paved access road to Ross Lake National Recreation Area, is usually closed to through traffic 
from November to April because of snow and the danger of avalanches; contact the park for 
up-to-date road conditions. There is no road access to the south end of Ross Lake; the only 
road access to the north end is via the Trans-Canada Highway in British Columbia and the 
gravel Silver-Skagit Road. Campers should keep a clean camp and store food in vehicles, or, in 
the backcountry, hang it high between trees, to avoid attracting black bears. 

Lake Chelan Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 

National Recreation Area sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Harlequin (hike-in, bus-in) 7 • 



100 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Purple Point (hike-in) 

Group Campground 

Harlequin (hike-in, bus-in) 
Backcountry Campsites 

Rick Creek (hike-in, boat-in) 

Manley Wham (boat-in) 

Weaver Point (hike-in, 
boat-in) 

Other locations (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 



7 



22 



ltd 



North Cascades 
National Park 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Group Campground 

Bridge Creek Group 
(hike-in, bus-in) 

Backcountry Campsites 

Bridge Creek (hike-in, 
bus-in) 

Cottonwood (hike-in, bus-in) 

Dolly Varden (hike-in, 
bus-in) 

High Bridge (hike-in, bus-in) 

Shady (hike-in, bus-in) 

Tumwater (hike-in, bus-in) 

Other locations (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 



7 



ltd 



Ross Lake 

National Recreation Area 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Colonial Creek 

Diablo Lake Resort 

Goodell Creek 

Hozomeen 

Newhalem Creek 

Group Campground 

Goodell Creek 

Backcountry Campsites 

Big Beaver (hike-in, boat-in) 

Boundary Bay (boat-in) 

Buster Brown (boat-in) 

Cat Island (boat-in) 

Cougar Island (boat-in) 

Devil's Junction (hike-in, 
boat-in) 



164 • • • • • • 


6 • • • • • • 


22 • • • • • 


122 • • • 


129 • • • • • • • 




6 • • • 




7 • 


3 • 


3 • 


5 • 


3 • 


1 • 



101 



Ross Lake continued 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Rush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Dry Creek (boat-in) 

Green Point (hike-in, 
boat-in) 

Hidden Cove (boat-in) 

Lightning Creek (hike-in, 
boat-in) 

Little Beaver (boat-in) 

May Creek (hike-in, boat-in) 

McMillian (boat-in) 

Ponderosa (boat-in) 

Rainbow Point (hike-in, 
boat-in) 

Roland Point (boat-in) 

Silver Creek (boat-in) 

Spencer's Camp (boat-in) 

Ten-Mile Island (boat-in) 

Thunder Point (boat-in) 

Other locations (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in) 



7 • 


1 • 


6 • 


6 • 


1 • 


3 • 


3 • 


4 • 


1 • 


3 • 


2 • 


3 • 


3 • 


ltd • 



Olympic National Park 

600 East Park Avenue, Port Angeles, WA 98362 

Setting: Camping areas are located throughout the park's extraordinarily diverse landscape. 
Scenes change from the snow- and glacier-covered peaks of the Olympic Range, to forests of 
hemlock, fir, and pine, to lush Pacific rainforests, to rocky ocean shores where harbor seals 
and migrating gray whales can be spotted. Elevations range from sea level to 5,400 feet. 
Tent/RV Campgrounds: Elwha, Fairholm, Heart O' the Hills, Hoh, Kalaloch, Mora, Ozette, 
Soleduck, and Staircase are open all year. Heavy snows sometimes close some of these camp- 
grounds for periods. Water and flush toilets at Soleduck are available only from Memorial Day 
through September; the rest of the year no water is available and pit toilets are provided. All 
campgrounds are on a first-come, first-served basis. Deer Park, Dosewallips, North Fork, and 
Queets are for tents only, because the access roads are too narrow and rough for RVs. RVs 21 
feet long or shorter are recommended in the rest of the campgrounds; however most have 
some sites that accommodate RVs up to 30 feet. Staircase is limited solely to RVs 21 feet or 
shorter. Wheelchair-accessible toilets are provided at Dosewallips, Elwha, Fairholm, Graves 
Creek, Heart O' the Hills, Hoh, Kalaloch, Mora, Queets, Soleduck, and Staircase. 
Group Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open all year. Reservations are required and must be 
made through the appropriate ranger station (Kalaloch, Mora, or Ozette). Kalaloch accommo- 
dates a maximum of 40 persons; Mora, a maximum of 20; Ozette, up to 12; Quinault River, a 
maximum of 12. Wheelchair-accessible toilets are available at Kalaloch and Mora. 
Backcountry Campsites: Erickson's Bay is open all year. A backcountry permit is required for 
camping at this site. July Creek is open all year; water is available only from June to Septem- 
ber. Backcountry camping is allowed throughout much of the rest of the park, too; a back- 
country permit is required. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Elwha, Heart O' the Hills, Hoh, Mora, and Staircase— evening ranger programs; Fairholm— 
gasoline, boat rentals, evening ranger programs; Kalaloch— restaurant, gasoline station, eve- 
ning ranger programs; Soleduck— restaurant, evening ranger programs. 



102 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Altaire 

Deer Park 

Dosewallips 

Elwha 

Fairholm 

Graves Creek 

Heart O' the Hills 

Hoh 

Kalaloch 



Mora 



North Fork 



Ozette 



Queets 



Soleduck 



Staircase 



Group Campgrounds 



Kalaloch 



Mora 



Ozette 



Quinault River 



Backcountry Campsites 

Erickson's Bay (hike-in, 
boat-in) 

July Creek (hike-in) 

Other locations (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in, boat-in) 



30 • i 


1 • 


14 1 


1 • 


18 i 


1 14 i 




32 i 


1 14 1 




41 • 1 


1 • 


14 i 




87 • i 


1 • 


14 i 


» • • 


30 • 1 


> 14 




105 • « 


1 • 


14 i 




89 • < 


» • 


14 1 


1 • • 


177 • 1 


1 • 


14 i 


» • • 


• 


94 • i 


1 • 


14 4 


I • • 


1 i 


» 14 




14 • i 


1 14 i 




20 i 


1 14 




80 • < 


1 • 


14 i 


1 • • 


• 


59 • 1 


1 • 


14 4 










ltd • « 


1 • 


14 1 


1 • • 


• 


ltd • « 


1 • 


14 i 


1 • • 


ltd • i 


1 14 i 




ltd « 


1 14 






15 i 


1 14 


29 • I 


» 14 • 


ltd I 


1 14 



103 



Apostle Islands: There's no extra charge for the view. 




West Virginia 

Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park (see Maryland) 



Wisconsin 

Apostle Islands National Lakeshore 
Route 1, Box 4, Bayfield, WI 54814 

Setting: Campers seeking an island getaway can choose from 18 of the 21 Apostle Islands in 
this Lake Superior park. Covered in a second growth forest of maple, birch, oak, fir, and pine, 
the islands are home to bald eagles, black bears, and nesting colonies of waterbirds. The park 
features scenic sand beaches, shoreline cliffs, and sea caves as well as historic brownstone quar- 
ries, commercial fish camps, and 6 lighthouses. Island access is by boat only. 
Group Campgrounds: See "Backcountry Campsites" below for information on backcountry 
group sites. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed free of charge all year throughout 
much of the park. A backcountry permit is required. Most backcountry campsites are for par- 
ties of fewer than 10 persons. Group sites for 10 or more persons are available at Basswood, 
Oak, Sand, and Stockton islands. Reservations are required for group sites; call the park. Drink- 
ing water is available from mid-May through September at many locations. 
Special Notes: In July and August, a commercial boat carries passengers from Bayfield, Wis- 
consin, to several islands where camping is permitted. Water taxi service (6 passengers) is avail- 
able from early May to October. For reservations contact Apostle Islands Cruise Service, Box 
691, Bayfield, WI 54814. Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Raspberry Island— lighthouse tours; Manitou Island— fish camp tours; Stockton Island— ranger- 
guided walks and evening programs. Campers should keep a clean campsite and hang their 
food high in trees to avoid attracting black bears. Bearproof foodlockers are available at some 
sites. Mosquitoes and biting flies can be bothersome in warmer months; bring insect repellent 
and bug-proof tent netting. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Backcountry Campsites 



7 4 


1 14 • 


1 1 


1 14 


1 I 


> 14 


8 1 


1 14 • 


7 I 


1 14 • 


4 I 


1 14 • 


4 I 


ft 14 • 


24 1 


» 14 • 


ltd 1 


1 14 



Basswood Island (boat-in) 
Devils Island (boat-in) 
Manitou Island (boat-in) 
Oak Island (boat-in) 
Rocky Island (boat-in) 
Sand Island (boat-in) 
South Twin Island (boat-in) 
Stockton Island (boat-in) 
Other locations (boat-in) 



Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway Camping in Wisconsin and 

P.O. Box 708, Saint Croix Falls, WI 54024 Minnesota 

Setting: The Saint Croix and Namekagon Rivers are naturally designed for a combination of 
canoeing and camping. Along the 227 miles of riverway are pine and hardwood forests, marshes, 
quiet pools, and rapids. For part of its length, the Saint Croix flows along the Wisconsin- 
Minnesota border. Fishermen can angle for trout, pike, bass, and sunfish. Whitetail deer and 
waterfowl are common. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open from April through October on a first-come, 
first-served basis; exact dates depend on the weather. The limit of stay noted below is for each 
campground; the total permitted length of stay in the park is 14 days. Both campgrounds have 
wheelchair-accessible toilets. 

105 



Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed from April through October through- 
out much of the park on a first-come, first-served basis; exact dates depend on the weather. 
One area— Highway 70— has several campsites; the rest of the designated sites are primarily 
designed for one camping party. Although many backcountry sites are accessible by road, the 
park discourages anyone but persons floating the river from using them. Drinking water is 
available at some sites and not at others. The limit of stay noted below is for each specific 
campsite; the total permitted length of stay in the park is 14 days. 

Special Notes: Many state park camping areas are located along the river; state parks require a 
camping permit and charge fees. Campers should be careful not to trespass on private property 
along the river. All drive-in campsites have a 1-night camping limit. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Rush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Earl Park 



Howell Landing (walk-in) 
Backcountry Campsites 

Highway 70 (walk-in) 
Other locations (canoe-in) 



15 


• 


1 


• 


8 


• 


1 


• 




15 


• 


1 


• 


ltd 


• 


3 





106 



Wyoming 

Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area (see Montana) 

Devils Tower National Monument 
Devils Tower, WY 82714 

Setting: Devils Tower— one of the "things in nature that engender an awful quiet in the heart 
of man," according to one observer— breaks into the sky to the northwest of the camping areas. 
The flat-topped fluted stone column, the core of an ancient volcano, rises 867 feet from its 
base. Cottonwood trees in a bend of the Belle Fourche River shade the camping areas. 
Tent/RV Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. 
Campground roads are not plowed in winter; snow may make access difficult. Water and flush 
toilets are provided from April to November; the rest of the year water and restrooms are avail- 
able V4 mile away at park headquarters. RVs up to 35 feet long are permitted. The campground 
has a few wheelchair-accessible sites and restrooms. 

Group Campground: The campground is open all year on a first-come, first-served basis. Camp- 
ground roads are not plowed in winter; snow may make access difficult. Water and flush toilets 
are provided from April to November; the rest of the year water and restrooms are available % 
mile away at park headquarters. Groups must include at least 7 persons. RVs up to 35 feet long 
are permitted. 

Special Notes: Heavy snows can close park roads in the winter; call the park for information 
on up-to-date road conditions. Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camp- 
ing areas include: Belle Fourche River— hot showers, gasoline stations, restaurant, evening 
ranger programs. 

Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Rush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 

Tent/RV Campground 



Belle Fourche River 47 • • • 14 

Group Campground 



Belle Fourche River 3 • • • 14 



Grand Teton National Park 
P.O. Drawer 170, Moose, WY 83012 

Setting: The valley of Jackson Hole, where blue lakes reflect the craggy snow-capped 12,000- to 
14,000-foot peaks of the Teton Range, is the center for camping. The Snake River and smaller 
streams flow through the valley. Backcountry campers can retreat farther into the mountains. 
Pronghorn antelope, moose, bald eagles, and a large elk herd range from the sagebrush flats to 
the high forested slopes. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Gros Ventre and Signal Mountain are open from mid-May to mid- 
October. Colter Bay and Jenny Lake are open from late May to mid- or late September. Lizard 
Creek is open from mid-June to early September. All sites at these campgrounds are available 
on a first-come, first-served basis. Colter Bay Tent Cabins, where canvas-and-log tents are pro- 
vided, is open from early June to early September. A woodstove, bunk beds without linens, and 
storage chest are provided; other camping gear can be rented within 1 mile. Colter Bay Trailer 
Village, with water, electrical, and sewage hookups for RVs, is open from late May to late 
September. Reservations are required for the Tent Cabins and the Trailer Village; contact the 
park concessioner at Grand Teton Lodge Company, P.O. Box 250, Moran, WY 83013. Reserva- 
tions are accepted beginning in November prior to the upcoming camping season. Winter 
camping for tent and RV campers is permitted at Colter Bay Visitor Center from mid-October 
to early May; sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis, and drinking water and rest- 
rooms are available at the visitor center. In the summer, campgrounds fill up by noon or early 
afternoon daily. 

Group Campground: Campgrounds are open from mid- or late May to mid-September. Reser- 
vations are recommended and accepted from January 1 to June 1 for the upcoming camping 

107 



season; write the park. Campgrounds are for organized groups only. Groups must include at 
least 10 persons. Some sites may accommodate only 12 persons; larger sites can accommodate 
up to 75. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year. A backcountry permit is 
required. Reservations can be made for many backcountry sites; persons must know when and 
where they want to camp. Reservations are accepted by the park from January 1 to June 1 for 
the upcoming camping season. Many backcountry sites are available on a first-come, first-served 
basis; persons must pick up their permit within 24 hours of the start of their trip. Camping parties 
cannot include more than 12 persons in sites designed for groups or more than 6 in smaller 
sites. The limit of stay noted below is for any specific site, or designated backcountry zone; the 
total permitted length of stay in the backcountry is 10 days. Campers with horses are restricted 
to a few campsites. Climbing parties must have a climbing permit as well as a camping permit. 
Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Colter Bay, Colter Bay Tent Cabins, and Colter Bay Trailer Village— hot showers, coin-operated 
laundry, restaurant, gasoline station, horse rentals, marina, boat rentals, evening ranger pro- 
grams; Gros Ventre and Lizard Creek— evening ranger programs; Signal Mountain— restaurant, 
gasoline station, marina, boat rentals, float trips down the Snake River, windsurfing school, 
evening ranger programs. Fires are permitted only in grills provided, designated fire rings, or 
campstoves. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Colter Bay 

Colter Bay Tent Cabins 

Colter Bay Trailer Village 

Gros Ventre 

Jenny Lake 

Lizard Creek 

Signal Mountain 

Group Campgrounds 

Colter Bay 

Gros Ventre 

Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in, boat-in) 



350 • • • 14 • • • • 


72 • • 14 • • • • 


112 • • 14 • • • • 


360 • • • 14 • •• • 


49 • • 7 • • • 


63 • • • 14 • • 


86 • • • 14 • •• • 




10 • • 14 


5 • • 14 




ltd • 2 



John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Memorial Parkway 

c/o Grand Teton National Park, P.O. Drawer 170, Moose, WY 83012 

Setting: This scenic corridor linking Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks has road- 
side camping areas located in spruce-pine forests. The Snake River, with its bordering steep 
cliffs and rock outcrops, passes nearby these main camping areas. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Campgrounds are open from mid-May through September. Grassy Lake 
sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Reservations are accepted for Flagg Ranch. 
Reservations are recommended at least 3 weeks in advance; contact the park concessioner at 
Flagg Ranch, P.O. Box 187, Moran, WY 83013. Flagg Ranch has electrical and water hookups 
for RVs. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally within 1 mile of camping areas include: Flagg 
Ranch— hot showers, coin-operated laundry, restaurant, gasoline station, horse rentals, guided 
float trips down the Snake River. Grassy Lake has primitive, non-fee campsites with pit toilets. 
Campers should keep a clean camp and store food in their vehicles, or, in the backcountry, 
hang it high from trees, to avoid attracting grizzly and black bears. Fires are permitted only in 
grills provided or campstoves. 



108 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Flagg Ranch 150 



Grassy Lake; 8 • 14 



Yellowstone National Park 

P.O. Box 168, Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190 

Setting: For campers in this Rocky Mountain wilderness, Old Faithful, symbol of America's 
oldest park, is just one of a multitude of wonders. Thousands of geysers, hot springs, and other 
thermal features erupt, bubble, steam, and simmer. Yellowstone Lake and the Grand Canyon 
of the Yellowstone River are grand-scale treasures. Grizzlies, black bears, bison, and elk head 
an impressive wildlife list. 

Tent/RV Campgrounds: Mammoth is open all year. Madison is open from about early May 
through October. Norris is open from mid-May to mid-September. Slough Creek is open from 
about mid-May through October. Bridge Bay is open from about late May to mid-September. 
Fishing Bridge RV Park is open from about early June to early September. Pebble Creek and 
Tower Fall is open from late May to mid-September. Canyon and Indian Creek are open from 
early June to mid-September. Grant Village and Lewis Lake are open from about mid-June to 
mid- or late October. Opening and closing dates can vary widely depending on the weather and 
other factors. All campgrounds except Fishing Bridge RV Park and Bridge Bay are on a first- 
come, first-served basis. At Fishing Bridge RV Park reservations can be made by writing to 
TW Recreational Services, Yellowstone National Park, WY 82190, or calling 307-344-7311. 
Reservations can also be made at Bridge Bay; see pages 6-7 for details. Canyon and Fishing 
Bridge RV Park are open only to hard-sided camping vehicles. The limit of stay is as noted 
below from July 1 to Labor Day; the rest of the year it is 30 days. Motor-driven generators are 
permitted only in Bridge Bay, Canyon, Fishing Bridge RV Park, Grant Village, Madison, and 
Mammoth. Wheelchair-accessible restrooms with flush toilets are available at Fishing Bridge 
RV Park and Madison; wheelchair-accessible vault toilets are at Indian Creek, Lewis Lake, 
Tower Fall, Slough Creek, and Pebble Creek. Campgrounds often fill up during the camping 
season; campers should arrive well before noon, especially in July and August, to get a site. 
Group Campgrounds: Bridge Bay is open from late May to mid-September. Grant Village is 
open from mid-June through October. Reservations are required; contact the park's visitor ser- 
vices office. The campgrounds are for organized groups only. Groups must include more than 
10 persons. All group campgrounds are only for organized groups with designated leaders trav- 
eling in three or less vehicles. 

Backcountry Campsites: Backcountry camping is allowed all year throughout much of the park 
on a first-come, first-served basis. A backcountry permit is required. The limit of stay permit- 
ted at any specific campsite may be 1, 2, or 3 days; the total length of stay permitted in the 
backcountry is 14 days. Persons boating into campsites must get a boating permit as well as a 
camping permit. 

Special Notes: Services available seasonally or all year within 1 mile of camping areas include: 
Bridge Bay— coin-operated laundry, hot showers, restaurant, gasoline station, marina, boat 
tours, evening ranger programs; Canyon— hot showers, coin-operated laundry, horse rentals, 
evening ranger programs; Fishing Bridge RV Park— hot showers, coin-operated laundry, restau- 
rant, evening ranger programs; Grant Village — hot showers, coin-operated laundry, gasoline 
station, evening ranger programs; Indian Creek, Lewis Lake, Madison, Norris, and Tower Falls 
— evening ranger programs; Mammoth— restaurant, evening ranger programs. Weather is ex- 
tremely variable; temperatures can fluctuate by as much as 40-50°F in 24 hours. Fires are per- 
mitted only in grills provided, designated fire rings, or campstoves; fire permits are required 
for fires in the backcountry. Campers should keep a clean campsite and store food in vehicles 
or, in the backcountry, hang it high from trees or provided wires or poles to avoid attracting 
black or grizzly bears. Parts of the backcountry are sometimes closed because of bears. Keep 
your distance from bears, bison, elk, and other wildlife. Hot springs and geysers are fragile and 



109 



unstable; stay on trails to protect yourself and these features. Throwing coins and other items 
into thermal pools damages them and is illegal. Swimming or bathing in thermal pools or streams 
whose waters originate entirely from a thermal spring or pool is prohibited. 



Total RVs Tents Fee Limit Drinking Flush Sanitary Camp 
sites of stay water toilets dump store 



Tent/RV Campgrounds 

Bridge Bay 

Canyon 

Fishing Bridge RV Park 

Grant Village 

Indian Creek 

Lewis Lake 

Madison 

Mammoth 

Norris 

Pebble Creek 

Slough Creek 

Tower Fall 

Group Campgrounds 

Bridge Bay 

Grant Village 

Backcountry Campsites 

Various locations (hike-in, 
horseback ride-in, boat-in) 



420 • • • 14 • • • • 


280 • • 14 • • • • 


358 • • 14 • • • • 


403 • • • 14 • •• • 


75 • • • 14 • 


85 • • • 14 • 


292 • • • 14 • • • 


85 • • • 14 • • • 


116 • • • 14 • • 


36 • • • 14 • 


29 • • • 14 • 


32 • • • 14 • 




4 • • 14 • •• • 


8 • • 14 • •• • 




ltd • varies 



110 



Yellowstone: A showcase of the beauty and power of nature. 



'km n 



Index 



Acadia National Park 53 

Alaska 18 

Amistad National Recreation 

Area 85 

Antietam National Battlefield 

54 

Apostle Islands National 

Lakeshore 105 

Arches National Park 89 

Arizona 21 

Arkansas 25 

Assateague Island National 

Seashore 54 

Badlands National Park 82 
Bandelier National Monu- 
ment 71 

Big Bend National Park 85 
Bighorn Canyon National 
Recreation Area 66 
Big South Fork National 
River and Recreation Area 83 
Biscayne National Park 44 
Black Canyon of the Gun- 
nison National Monument 38 
Blue Ridge Parkway 74 
Bryce Canyon National Park 
89 
Buffalo National River 25 

California 27 

Canyon de Chelly National 
Monument 21 

Canyonlands National Park 
90 

Cape Hatteras National 
Seashore 74 
Cape Lookout National 
Seashore 75 

Capitol Reef National Park 
91 

Catoctin Mountain Park 55 
Cedar Breaks National 
Monument 92 
Chaco Culture National 
Historical Park 71 
Channel Islands National 
Park 27 

Chesapeake and Ohio Canal 
National Historical Park 55 
Chickamauga and Chatta- 
nooga National Military 
Park 47 

Chickasaw National Recrea- 
tion Area 77 



Chiricahua National Monu- 
ment 21 
Colorado 38 

Colorado National Monu- 
ment 38 

Coulee Dam National Rec- 
reation Area 98 
Crater Lake National Park 
78 

Craters of the Moon National 
Monument 50 
Cumberland Gap National 
Historical Park 51 
Cumberland Island National 
Seashore 47 

Curecanti National Recrea- 
tion Area 39 

Death Valley National 
Monument 27 
Delaware Water Gap 
National Recreation Area 79 
Denali National Park and 
Preserve 18 

Devils Postpile National 
Monument 28 
Devils Tower National 
Monument 107 
Dinosaur National Monu- 
ment 39 

El Morro National Monu- 
ment 72 
Everglades National Park 44 

Fire Island National Sea- 
shore 73 
Florida 44 

Fort Jefferson National 
Monument 45 
Fort Necessity National 
Battlefield 80 

Georgia 47 

Gettysburg National Military 
Park 80 

Glacier Bay National Park 
and Preserve 19 
Glacier National Park 66 
Glen Canyon National 
Recreation Area 92 
Golden Gate National 
Recreation Area 29 
Grand Canyon National 
Park 22 



Grand Portage National 
Monument 63 
Grand Teton National Park 
107 

Great Basin National Park 68 
Great Sand Dunes National 
Monument 40 
Great Smoky Mountains 
National Park 83 
Greenbelt Park 57 
Guadalupe Mountains 
National Park 86 
Gulf Islands National Sea- 
shore 45 . 64 

Haleakala National Park 48 
Hawaii 48 

Hawaii Volcanoes National 
Park 48 

Hot Springs National Park 26 
Hovenweep National Monu- 
ment 93 

Idaho 50 

Isle Royale National Park 58 

John D. Rockefeller, Jr., 
Memorial Parkway 108 
Joshua Tree National Monu- 
ment 29 

Katmai National Park and 

Preserve 19 

Kenai Fjords National Park 

20 

Kentucky 51 

Kings Canyon National Park 

30 

Kings Mountain National 

Military Park 81 

Klondike Gold Rush National 

Historical Park 20 

Lake Chelan National 
Recreation Area 100 
Lake Mead National Recrea- 
tion Area 68 
Lake Meredith National 
Recreation Area 87 
Lassen Volcanic National 
Park 31 

Lava Beds National Monu- 
ment 32 

Maine 53 



112 




Mammoth Cave National 

Park 52 

Maryland 54 

Mesa Verde National Park 41 

Michigan 58 

Minnesota 63 

Mississippi 64 

Missouri 65 

Montana 66 

Mount Rainier National 

Park 99 

Natchez Trace Parkway 

64 

Natural Bridges National 

Monument 94 

Navajo National Monument 

23 

Nevada 68 

New Jersey 71 

New Mexico 71 

New York 73 

North Carolina 74 

North Cascades National 

Park 100 

North Cascades National 

Park Service Complex 

100 

North Dakota 76 

Oklahoma 77 

Olympic National Park 102 

Oregon 78 

Organ Pipe Cactus National 

Monument 23 

Ozark National Scenic 

Riverways 65 

Padre Island National Sea- 
shore 87 
Pennsylvania 79 
Pictured Rocks National 
Lakeshore 59 
Pinnacles National Monu- 
ment 32 

Point Reyes National Sea- 
shore 33 

Prince William Forest Park 
95 

Redwood National Park 33 
Rocky Mountain National 
Park 41 

Ross Lake National Recrea- 
tion Area 100 



Saguaro National Monument 

24 

Saint Croix National Scenic 

Riverway 105 

Sequoia National Park 34 

Shenandoah National Park 95 

Sleeping Bear Dunes 

National Lakeshore 60 

South Carolina 81 

South Dakota 82 

Tennessee 83 
Texas 85 
Theodore R 
Park 76 



Clemson Universi 




3 1604 003 817 485 



Utah 89 

Virginia 95 
Virgin Islan 
Virgin Islan 

97 
Voyageurs I 

Washington 
West Virgin 
Whiskeytov 
National Re 
Wind Cave 
Wisconsin 1 
Wyoming II 

Yellowstone 

109 
Yosemite N 

Zion Natior 



DATE DUE 








1992 








MAY 2 199 


i 


MAY ] 1 19 


¥1 





















































DEMCO, INC. 38-2931 



& GPO: 1991-281-952/20003 



The National Parks: 
Camping Guide